354

How to recursively list all the files in a directory and child directories in C#?

6
  • 1
    Where do you want to populate? if tree... here is the example dreamincode.net/code/snippet2591.htm – Arsen Mkrtchyan May 30 '09 at 7:52
  • 84
    string [] filenames = Directory.GetFiles( path, "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories ) – Bruce May 30 '09 at 7:54
  • You may want to look at this question where I have presented a code sample that uses recursion to render a directory structure in a TreeView. The logic should be the same in most cases. – Cerebrus May 30 '09 at 8:13
  • 6
    The problem with this is that it breaks very easily if you don't have access to a single directory: no results... – Marc Gravell May 30 '09 at 9:15
  • 1
    If you run into trouble when some files aren't accessible, look into Enumerating Files Throwing Exception – CodesInChaos Aug 8 '13 at 11:05

22 Answers 22

211

This article covers all you need. Except as opposed to searching the files and comparing names, just print out the names.

It can be modified like so:

static void DirSearch(string sDir)
{
    try
    {
        foreach (string d in Directory.GetDirectories(sDir))
        {
            foreach (string f in Directory.GetFiles(d))
            {
                Console.WriteLine(f);
            }
            DirSearch(d);
        }
    }
    catch (System.Exception excpt)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(excpt.Message);
    }
}

Added by barlop

GONeale mentions that the above doesn't list the files in the current directory and suggests putting the file listing part outside the part that gets directories. The following would do that. It also includes a Writeline line that you can uncomment, that helps to trace where you are in the recursion that may help to show the calls to help show how the recursion works.

            DirSearch_ex3("c:\\aaa");
            static void DirSearch_ex3(string sDir)
            {
                //Console.WriteLine("DirSearch..(" + sDir + ")");
                try
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(sDir);

                    foreach (string f in Directory.GetFiles(sDir))
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(f);
                    }

                    foreach (string d in Directory.GetDirectories(sDir))
                    {
                        DirSearch_ex3(d);
                    }
                }
                catch (System.Exception excpt)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(excpt.Message);
                }
            }
7
  • 86
    This method does not list files for the initial directory, only it's sub dirs and lower. I would move GetFiles outside GetDirectories – GONeale Jul 6 '10 at 0:35
  • 1
    Sometimes one doesn't want the files for the initial directory, in which case this is perfect for reasonably small structures. For very large lists, use something like Marc Gravell's solution: stackoverflow.com/a/929418/91189 – Joseph Gabriel Nov 25 '14 at 14:19
  • 2
    @GONeale is correct. It is much less plausible for a user not to expect the file listing of the input root directory. The word input is key here. It has been input for a reason. – Florin Mircea Jul 7 '16 at 18:08
  • 2
    I had to add a try catch around the inner foreach loop otherwise it does not continue of access denied errors – Shaun Vermaak Feb 27 '17 at 15:26
  • 3
    You should avoid catching Exception - would you really want to catch An OutOfMemoryException for example? Only catch what you can handle. – alastairtree Mar 5 '18 at 14:25
468

Note that in .NET 4.0 there are (supposedly) iterator-based (rather than array-based) file functions built in:

foreach (string file in Directory.EnumerateFiles(path, "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories))
{
    Console.WriteLine(file);
}

At the moment I'd use something like below; the inbuilt recursive method breaks too easily if you don't have access to a single sub-dir...; the Queue<string> usage avoids too much call-stack recursion, and the iterator block avoids us having a huge array.

static void Main() {
    foreach (string file in GetFiles(SOME_PATH)) {
        Console.WriteLine(file);
    }
}

static IEnumerable<string> GetFiles(string path) {
    Queue<string> queue = new Queue<string>();
    queue.Enqueue(path);
    while (queue.Count > 0) {
        path = queue.Dequeue();
        try {
            foreach (string subDir in Directory.GetDirectories(path)) {
                queue.Enqueue(subDir);
            }
        }
        catch(Exception ex) {
            Console.Error.WriteLine(ex);
        }
        string[] files = null;
        try {
            files = Directory.GetFiles(path);
        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            Console.Error.WriteLine(ex);
        }
        if (files != null) {
            for(int i = 0 ; i < files.Length ; i++) {
                yield return files[i];
            }
        }
    }
}
6
  • Take into account whitespaces as directory name => stackoverflow.com/q/5368054/2336304 – SerG Feb 20 '16 at 10:18
  • 8
    For all who want to know whether *.* also includes files without file extension: Yes, it does, tested a minute ago. – Tobias Knauss Jun 9 '16 at 16:28
  • 3
    To use this you will need to add using System.IO; – Reinstate Monica - Goodbye SE Jun 21 '16 at 8:09
  • 7
    @Wikis and to use Console you will need to add using System; - but since the IDE can add all the necessary using directives for you (ctrl+.), and since we're not using anything exotic here, it is common to not include them. Heck, you'll also need a class definition etc. Just sayin' – Marc Gravell Jun 21 '16 at 8:58
  • 4
    @MarcGravell We're in the .net core and Visual Studio Code world now, so including Using statements is always welcome in any example .net code to save a series of searches and pointless "yak shaving" – JohnC May 2 '18 at 17:39
118
+250
Directory.GetFiles("C:\\", "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
5
  • 2
    How to avoid the error if login user doesn't have access on some of the folders. – Romil Kumar Jain Feb 10 '15 at 11:37
  • 5
    @Romil I do not believe this code snippet is trying to indicate full functionality, only the raw functionality that the OP was seeking. Thanks for sharing, Pescuma! – kayleeFrye_onDeck Mar 10 '15 at 14:15
  • @kayleeFrye_onDeck, I put only a concern in case if there is an raised for any of the folder while getting files. Due to this concern we implement our custom recursive function. – Romil Kumar Jain Mar 11 '15 at 4:15
  • 3
    You will receive "UnauthorizedAccessException" with this solution. You should have a solution that can handle errors like this. – Kairan Dec 16 '17 at 23:25
  • For all dirs Directory.GetDirectories(@"yourpath" , "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories) – snr Dec 29 '20 at 14:49
14

In .NET 4.5, at least, there's this version that is much shorter and has the added bonus of evaluating any file criteria for inclusion in the list:

public static IEnumerable<string> GetAllFiles(string path, 
                                              Func<FileInfo, bool> checkFile = null)
{
    string mask = Path.GetFileName(path);
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(mask)) mask = "*.*";
    path = Path.GetDirectoryName(path);
    string[] files = Directory.GetFiles(path, mask, SearchOption.AllDirectories);

    foreach (string file in files)
    {
        if (checkFile == null || checkFile(new FileInfo(file)))
            yield return file;
    }
}

Use like this:

var list = GetAllFiles(mask, (info) => Path.GetExtension(info.Name) == ".html").ToList();
2
  • This doesn't handle a case where you have an empty directory... there is no return statement inside the function. – FrumkinWY Aug 6 '18 at 14:53
  • @FrumkinWY what happens with an empty directory? I don't have a machine handy to test this on now. – John Kaster Aug 7 '18 at 19:34
13

Shortest record

string files = Directory.GetFiles(@"your_path", "*.jpg", SearchOption.AllDirectories);
2
  • 2
    Would that not be string[] files? – Philipp Lenssen Aug 13 '20 at 6:47
  • I don't understand why this answer was added in the first place and why it has so many upvotes. It's the same exact answer as stackoverflow.com/a/23253890/1039753 that was added 6 years before this answer. Why would you just not improve on the old answer if you wanted to add a string declaration and @ to avoid needing to escape the slashes? – Arvo Bowen Feb 10 at 4:32
12
IEnumerable<string> GetFilesFromDir(string dir) =>
 Directory.EnumerateFiles(dir).Concat(
 Directory.EnumerateDirectories(dir)
          .SelectMany(subdir => GetFilesFromDir(subdir)));
3

In Framework 2.0 you can use (It list files of root folder, it's best the most popular answer):

static void DirSearch(string dir)
{
    try
    {
        foreach (string f in Directory.GetFiles(dir))
            Console.WriteLine(f);
        foreach (string d in Directory.GetDirectories(dir))
        {
            Console.WriteLine(d);
            DirSearch(d);
        }

    }
    catch (System.Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
    }
}
0
3

Some excellent answers but these answers did not solve my issue.

As soon as a folder permission issue arises: "Permission Denied" the code fails. This is what I used to get around the "Permission Denied" issue:

private int counter = 0;

    private string[] MyDirectories = Directory.GetDirectories("C:\\");

    private void ScanButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Thread MonitorSpeech = new Thread(() => ScanFiles());
        MonitorSpeech.Start();
    }

    private void ScanFiles()
    {
        string CurrentDirectory = string.Empty;

        while (counter < MyDirectories.Length)
        {
            try
            {
                GetDirectories();
                CurrentDirectory = MyDirectories[counter++];
            }
            catch
            {
                if (!this.IsDisposed)
                {
                    listBox1.Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate { listBox1.Items.Add("Access Denied to : " + CurrentDirectory); });
                }
            }
        }
    }

    private void GetDirectories()
    {
        foreach (string directory in MyDirectories)
        {
            GetFiles(directory);
        }
    }

    private void GetFiles(string directory)
    {
        try
        {
            foreach (string file in Directory.GetFiles(directory, "*"))
            {
                listBox1.Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate { listBox1.Items.Add(file); });
            }
        }
        catch
        {
            listBox1.Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate { listBox1.Items.Add("Access Denied to : " + directory); });
        }
    }

Hope this helps others.

3

A simple and clean solution

/// <summary>
/// Scans a folder and all of its subfolders recursively, and updates the List of files
/// </summary>
/// <param name="sFullPath">Full path of the folder</param>
/// <param name="files">The list, where the output is expected</param>
internal static void EnumerateFiles(string sFullPath, List<FileInfo> fileInfoList)
{
    try
    {
        DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(sFullPath);
        FileInfo[] files = di.GetFiles();

        foreach (FileInfo file in files)
            fileInfoList.Add(file);

        //Scan recursively
        DirectoryInfo[] dirs = di.GetDirectories();
        if (dirs == null || dirs.Length < 1)
            return;
        foreach (DirectoryInfo dir in dirs)
            EnumerateFiles(dir.FullName, fileInfoList);

    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Logger.Write("Exception in Helper.EnumerateFiles", ex);
    }
}
1
  • 3
    You're manually doing what DirectoryInfo.GetFiles() will do for you out of the box - just use the overload with SearchOption.AllDirectories and it will recurse all on its own. So that's a complicated solution. – philw Nov 8 '16 at 14:19
2

I prefer to use DirectoryInfo because I can get FileInfo's, not just strings.

        string baseFolder = @"C:\temp";
        DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(baseFolder);

        string searchPattern = "*.xml";

        ICollection<FileInfo> matchingFileInfos = di.GetFiles(searchPattern, SearchOption.AllDirectories)
            .Select(x => x)
            .ToList();

I do this in case in the future I need future filtering..based on the properties of FileInfo.

        string baseFolder = @"C:\temp";
        DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(baseFolder);

        string searchPattern = "*.xml";

        ICollection<FileInfo> matchingFileInfos = di.GetFiles(searchPattern, SearchOption.AllDirectories)
            .Where(x => x.LastWriteTimeUtc < DateTimeOffset.Now)
            .Select(x => x)
            .ToList();

I can also resort back to strings if need be. (and still am future proofed for filters/where-clause stuff.

        string baseFolder = @"C:\temp";
        DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(baseFolder);

        string searchPattern = "*.xml";

        ICollection<string> matchingFileNames = di.GetFiles(searchPattern, SearchOption.AllDirectories)
            .Select(x => x.FullName)
            .ToList();

Note that "." is a valid search pattern if you want to filer by extension.

1
private void GetFiles(DirectoryInfo dir, ref List<FileInfo> files)
{
    try
    {
        files.AddRange(dir.GetFiles());
        DirectoryInfo[] dirs = dir.GetDirectories();
        foreach (var d in dirs)
        {
            GetFiles(d, ref files);
        }
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {

    }
}
3
  • 1
    Why the parameter files is ref? There is no need. – Massimiliano Kraus Dec 15 '16 at 8:41
  • @MassimilianoKraus I'd argue that, while not required, it makes it clearer that his method will alter files and you can't just give new List<FileInfo>() as parameter anymore which would be useless. Might allow for some sub-optimisation and avoid creating a new object unless required. – jeromej Apr 7 '20 at 7:25
  • @JeromeJ if you know what OOP is, you know that whenever you pass an object to a method, that method can change the object's properties/fields. So ref doesn't make anything clearer. The ref's purpose is to change the whole files pointer even for the method's caller: it's a dangerous operation and here there is no need for that: you can just fill the List, you don't need to re-point it to another List on the heap. ref should be used only in very particular cases; most of the time you just need to implement things in a more functional-paradigm way. – Massimiliano Kraus Apr 8 '20 at 8:40
1

To avoid the UnauthorizedAccessException, I use:

var files = GetFiles(@"C:\", "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories);
foreach (var file in files)
{
    Console.WriteLine($"{file}");
}

public static IEnumerable<string> GetFiles(string path, string searchPattern, SearchOption searchOption)
{
    var foldersToProcess = new List<string>()
    {
        path
    };

    while (foldersToProcess.Count > 0)
    {
        string folder = foldersToProcess[0];
        foldersToProcess.RemoveAt(0);

        if (searchOption.HasFlag(SearchOption.AllDirectories))
        {
            //get subfolders
            try
            {
                var subfolders = Directory.GetDirectories(folder);
                foldersToProcess.AddRange(subfolders);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                //log if you're interested
            }
        }

        //get files
        var files = new List<string>();
        try
        {
            files = Directory.GetFiles(folder, searchPattern, SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly).ToList();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            //log if you're interested
        }

        foreach (var file in files)
        {
            yield return file;
        }
    }
}
1

If you only need filenames and since I didn't really like most of the solutions here (feature-wise or readability-wise), how about this lazy one?

private void Foo()
{
  var files = GetAllFiles("pathToADirectory");
  foreach (string file in files)
  {
      // Use can use Path.GetFileName() or similar to extract just the filename if needed
      // You can break early and it won't still browse your whole disk since it's a lazy one
  }
}

/// <exception cref="T:System.IO.DirectoryNotFoundException">The specified path is invalid (for example, it is on an unmapped drive).</exception>
/// <exception cref="T:System.UnauthorizedAccessException">The caller does not have the required permission.</exception>
/// <exception cref="T:System.IO.IOException"><paramref name="path" /> is a file name.-or-A network error has occurred.</exception>
/// <exception cref="T:System.IO.PathTooLongException">The specified path, file name, or both exceed the system-defined maximum length. For example, on Windows-based platforms, paths must be less than 248 characters and file names must be less than 260 characters.</exception>
/// <exception cref="T:System.ArgumentNullException"><paramref name="path" /> is null.</exception>
/// <exception cref="T:System.ArgumentException"><paramref name="path" /> is a zero-length string, contains only white space, or contains one or more invalid characters as defined by <see cref="F:System.IO.Path.InvalidPathChars" />.</exception>
[NotNull]
public static IEnumerable<string> GetAllFiles([NotNull] string directory)
{
  foreach (string file in Directory.GetFiles(directory))
  {
    yield return file; // includes the path
  }

  foreach (string subDir in Directory.GetDirectories(directory))
  {
    foreach (string subFile in GetAllFiles(subDir))
    {
      yield return subFile;
    }
  }
}
1

Some improved version with max lvl to go down in directory and option to exclude folders:

using System;
using System.IO;

class MainClass {
  public static void Main (string[] args) {

    var dir = @"C:\directory\to\print";
    PrintDirectoryTree(dir, 2, new string[] {"folder3"});
  }


  public static void PrintDirectoryTree(string directory, int lvl, string[] excludedFolders = null, string lvlSeperator = "")
  {
    excludedFolders = excludedFolders ?? new string[0];

    foreach (string f in Directory.GetFiles(directory))
    {
        Console.WriteLine(lvlSeperator+Path.GetFileName(f));
    } 

    foreach (string d in Directory.GetDirectories(directory))
    {
        Console.WriteLine(lvlSeperator + "-" + Path.GetFileName(d));

        if(lvl > 0 && Array.IndexOf(excludedFolders, Path.GetFileName(d)) < 0)
        {
          PrintDirectoryTree(d, lvl-1, excludedFolders, lvlSeperator+"  ");
        }
    }
  }
}

input directory:

-folder1
  file1.txt
  -folder2
    file2.txt
    -folder5
      file6.txt
  -folder3
    file3.txt
  -folder4
    file4.txt
    file5.txt

output of the function (content of folder5 is excluded due to lvl limit and content of folder3 is excluded because it is in excludedFolders array):

-folder1
  file1.txt
  -folder2
    file2.txt
    -folder5
  -folder3
  -folder4
    file4.txt
    file5.txt
0

Here's my angle on it, based on Hernaldo's, if you need to find files with names of a certain pattern, such as XML files that somewhere in their name contain a particular string:

// call this like so: GetXMLFiles("Platypus", "C:\\");
public static List<string> GetXMLFiles(string fileType, string dir)
{
    string dirName = dir; 
    var fileNames = new List<String>();
    try
    {
        foreach (string f in Directory.GetFiles(dirName))
        {
            if ((f.Contains(fileType)) && (f.Contains(".XML")))
            {
                fileNames.Add(f);
            }
        }
        foreach (string d in Directory.GetDirectories(dirName))
        {
            GetXMLFiles(fileType, d);
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
    }
    return fileNames;
}
0

Listing files and folders to model, custom implementation.
This creates a full listing of all files and folders starting from your start directory.

public class DirOrFileModel
    {
        #region Private Members

        private string _name;
        private string _location;
        private EntryType _entryType;

        #endregion

        #region Bindings

        public string Name
        {
            get { return _name; }
            set
            {
                if (value == _name) return;
                _name = value;
            }
        }

        public string Location
        {
            get { return _location; }
            set
            {
                if (value == _location) return;
                _location = value;
            }
        }

        public EntryType EntryType
        {
            get { return _entryType; }
            set
            {
                if (value == _entryType) return;
                _entryType = value;
            }
        }

        public ObservableCollection<DirOrFileModel> Entries { get; set; }

        #endregion

        #region Constructor

        public DirOrFileModel()
        {
            Entries = new ObservableCollection<DirOrFileModel>();
        }

        #endregion
    }

    public enum EntryType
    {
        Directory = 0,
        File = 1
    }

Method:

 static DirOrFileModel DirSearch(DirOrFileModel startDir)
        {
            var currentDir = startDir;
            try
            {
                foreach (string d in Directory.GetDirectories(currentDir.Location))
                {
                    var newDir = new DirOrFileModel
                    {
                        EntryType = EntryType.Directory,
                        Location = d,
                        Name = Path.GetFileName(d)
                    };
                    currentDir.Entries.Add(newDir);

                    DirSearch(newDir);
                }

                foreach (string f in Directory.GetFiles(currentDir.Location))
                {
                    var newFile = new DirOrFileModel
                    {
                        EntryType = EntryType.File,
                        Location = f,
                        Name = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(f)
                    };
                    currentDir.Entries.Add(newFile);
                }

            }
            catch (Exception excpt)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(excpt.Message);
            }
            return startDir;
        }

Usage:

var dir = new DirOrFileModel
            {
                Name = "C",
                Location = @"C:\",
                EntryType = EntryType.Directory
            };

            dir = DirSearch(dir);
0

Short and simple solution

string dir = @"D:\PATH";

DateTime from_date = DateTime.Now.Date;
DateTime to_date = DateTime.Now.Date.AddHours(23);
var files = Directory.EnumerateFiles(dir, "*.*",SearchOption.AllDirectories).Select(i=>new FileInfo(i))
.Where(file=>file.LastWriteTime >= from_date && file.LastWriteTime <= to_date);
foreach(var fl in files)
    Console.WriteLine(fl.FullName);
0

This one helped me to get all files in a directory and sub directories, May be helpful for someone. [ Inspired from above answers ]

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            var root = @"G:\logs";
            DirectorySearch(root);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
        }
        Console.ReadKey();
    }





public static void DirectorySearch(string root, bool isRootItrated = false)
{
    if (!isRootItrated)
    {
        var rootDirectoryFiles = Directory.GetFiles(root);
        foreach (var file in rootDirectoryFiles)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(file);
        } 
    }

    var subDirectories = Directory.GetDirectories(root);
    if (subDirectories?.Any() == true)
    {
        foreach (var directory in subDirectories)
        {
            var files = Directory.GetFiles(directory);
            foreach (var file in files)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(file);
            }
            DirectorySearch(directory, true);
        }
    }
}
0
var d = new DirectoryInfo(@"C:\logs");
var list = d.GetFiles("*.txt").Select(m => m.Name).ToList();
-1

Here is a version of B. Clay Shannon's code not static for excel-files:

class ExcelSearcher
{
    private List<string> _fileNames;

    public ExcelSearcher(List<string> filenames)
    {
        _fileNames = filenames;
    }
    public List<string> GetExcelFiles(string dir, List<string> filenames = null)
    {

        string dirName = dir;
        var dirNames = new List<string>();
        if (filenames != null)
        {
            _fileNames.Concat(filenames);
        }
        try
        {
            foreach (string f in Directory.GetFiles(dirName))
            {
                if (f.ToLower().EndsWith(".xls") || f.ToLower().EndsWith(".xlsx"))
                {
                    _fileNames.Add(f);
                }
            }
            dirNames = Directory.GetDirectories(dirName).ToList();
            foreach (string d in dirNames)
            {
                GetExcelFiles(d, _fileNames);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            //Bam
        }
        return _fileNames;
    }
0
-1

A very simple solution, returns a list of files.

    public static List<string> AllFilesInFolder(string folder)
    {
        var result = new List<string>();

        foreach (string f in Directory.GetFiles(folder))
        {
            result.Add(f);
        }

        foreach (string d in Directory.GetDirectories(folder))
        {
            result.AddRange(AllFilesInFolder(d));
        }

        return result;
    }
0
-2
static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string[] array1 = Directory.GetFiles(@"D:\");
            string[] array2 = System.IO.Directory.GetDirectories(@"D:\");
            Console.WriteLine("--- Files: ---");
            foreach (string name in array1)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(name);
            }
            foreach (string name in array2)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(name);
            }
                  Console.ReadLine();
        }
1
  • 1
    uhhh... this is not recursive – mxmissile Dec 21 '18 at 16:59