118

I'm trying to get my head around inverse_of and I do not get it.

What does the generated sql look like, if any?

Does the inverse_of option exhibit the same behavior if used with :has_many, :belongs_to, and :has_many_and_belongs_to?

Sorry if this is such a basic question.

I saw this example:

class Player < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :cards, :inverse_of => :player
end

class Card < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :player, :inverse_of => :cards
end
102

From the documentation, it seems like the :inverse_of option is a method for avoiding SQL queries, not generating them. It's a hint to ActiveRecord to use already loaded data instead of fetching it again through a relationship.

Their example:

class Dungeon < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :traps, :inverse_of => :dungeon
  has_one :evil_wizard, :inverse_of => :dungeon
end

class Trap < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :dungeon, :inverse_of => :traps
end

class EvilWizard < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :dungeon, :inverse_of => :evil_wizard
end

In this case, calling dungeon.traps.first.dungeon should return the original dungeon object instead of loading a new one as would be the case by default.

  • 5
    Do you understand the comment in the documentation: "for belongs_to associations has_many inverse associations are ignored.". And yet the doc uses that exact example. What am I missing here? – dynex Feb 16 '12 at 3:41
  • 46
    This is all very strange to me, because it seems to me that you would always want this behavior by default, and only need to use :inverse_of when the association name can't be inferred. Also the inconsistencies in the definition are bothersome, but it has helped me out in a few cases. Any reason I shouldn't just stick it everywhere? – Ibrahim Jul 6 '12 at 0:08
  • 16
    @Ibrahim Check this out, it was merged 23 days ago! github.com/rails/rails/pull/9522 – Hut8 May 30 '13 at 18:28
  • 6
    It makes sense for the inverse of a belongs_to association to be ignored because the child of a record A's parent record is not guaranteed to be record A -- it could be a sibling of Record A. The parent of a child of record A, however, is guaranteed to be record A. – David Aldridge Jul 17 '13 at 20:50
  • 2
    Future reader might get help from this blog... :D – Arup Rakshit Apr 7 '15 at 9:08
34

I think :inverse_of is most useful when you are working with associations that have not yet been persisted. E.g.:

class Project < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :tasks, :inverse_of=>:project
end

class Task < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :project, :inverse_of=>:tasks
end

Now, in the console:

irb> p = Project.new
=> #<Project id: nil, name: nil, ...>
irb> t = p.tasks.build
=> #<Task id: nil, project_id: nil, ...>
irb> t.project
=> #<Project id: nil, name: nil, ...>

Without the :inverse_of arguments, t.project would return nil, because it triggers an sql query and the data isn't stored yet. With the :inverse_of arguments, the data is retrieved from memory.

  • I had a problem with accepts_nested_attributes_for. By default, only nested attributes for existing associated objects shows (edit action). If, for example, you'd like to CREATE an object with, say, 3 associated objects, you should have Model.new (new action) and :inverse_of in your models. – Victor Marconi Oct 22 '14 at 11:11
  • Agreed on the behavior in Rails 4 and later, but it worked just fine in v3 (except some later incarnations, though the old syntax works again in v3.2.13). And note in the join-model, cannot validate presence of the id's any more - only the model-object. Seems you can have an association without an id for it, in v4 'logic'. – JosephK Sep 16 '15 at 1:57
  • Exactly.. :inverse_of solved an issue for me when creating new parent and child entities in the same form. – W.M. Sep 28 '16 at 6:30
12

From documentation of Rails 5.0 and great.

Guide

Bi-directional Associations

It's normal for associations to work in two directions, requiring declaration on two different models:

class Author < ApplicationRecord
  has_many :books
end

class Book < ApplicationRecord
  belongs_to :author
end

By default, Active Record doesn't know about the connection between these associations. This can lead to two copies of an object getting out of sync:

a = Author.first
b = a.books.first
a.first_name == b.author.first_name # => true
a.first_name = 'Manny'
a.first_name == b.author.first_name # => false

This happens because a and b.author are two different in-memory representations of the same data, and neither one is automatically refreshed from changes to the other. Active Record provides the :inverse_of option so that you can inform it of these relations:

class Author < ApplicationRecord
  has_many :books, inverse_of: :author
end

class Book < ApplicationRecord
  belongs_to :author, inverse_of: :books
end

With these changes, Active Record will only load one copy of the author object, preventing inconsistencies and making your application more efficient:

a = Author.first
b = a.books.first
a.first_name == b.author.first_name # => true
a.first_name = 'Manny'
a.first_name == b.author.first_name # => true

There are a few limitations to inverse_of support:

They do not work with :through associations. They do not work with :polymorphic associations. They do not work with :as associations.

For belongs_to associations, has_many inverse associations are ignored. Every association will attempt to automatically find the inverse association and set the :inverse_of option heuristically (based on the association name). Most associations with standard names will be supported. However, associations that contain the following options will not have their inverses set automatically:

  • :conditions
  • :through
  • :polymorphic
  • :foreign_key
  • I'm using Rails 5, and either you add inverse_of or not, the result for a.first_name == b.author.first_name is always ture. – Arslan Ali Dec 15 '16 at 12:17
5

Just an update for everyone - we just used inverse_of with one of our apps with a has_many :through association


It basically makes the "origin" object available to the "child" object

So if you're using the Rails' example:

class Dungeon < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :traps, :inverse_of => :dungeon
  has_one :evil_wizard, :inverse_of => :dungeon
end

class Trap < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :dungeon, :inverse_of => :traps
  validates :id,
      :presence => { :message => "Dungeon ID Required", :unless => :draft? }

  private
  def draft?
      self.dungeon.draft
  end 
end

class EvilWizard < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :dungeon, :inverse_of => :evil_wizard
end

Using :inverse_of will allow you to access the data object that it's the inverse of, without performing any further SQL queries

4

When we have 2 models with has_many and belongs_to relationship, it's always better to use inverse_of which inform ActiveRecod that they belongs to the same side of the association. So if a query from one side is triggered, it will cache and serve from cache if it get triggered from the opposite direction. Which improves in performance. From Rails 4.1, inverse_of will be set automatically, if we uses foreign_key or changes in class name we need to set explicitly.

Best article for details and example.

http://viget.com/extend/exploring-the-inverse-of-option-on-rails-model-associations

3

Take a look at this article!!

http://gsusmonzon.blogspot.com.br/2011/09/rails-power-of-inverseof.html

3

If you have a has_many_through relation between two models, User and Role, and want to validate the connecting model Assignment against non existing or invalid entries with validates_presence of :user_id, :role_id, it is useful. You can still generate a User @user with his association @user.role(params[:role_id]) so that saving the user would not result in a failing validation of the Assignment model.

-1

Please take a look 2 two useful resources

And remember some limitations of inverse_of :

does not work with :through associations.

does not work with :polymorphic associations.

for belongs_to associations has_many inverse associations are ignored.

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