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Is there a tool that can explain the size of a .NET assembly (executable or DLL file)?

In the olden days, there was an IDE extension that would detail the space used by a project.

It should show the large code files:

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And data resources:

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Is there such a thing for the .NET world?

I really thought that moving to .NET, and no longer having to build the entire VCL into the executable, that executable sizes would shrink.

Bonus Reading

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  • 1
    This question is way to broad..... Feb 16, 2012 at 15:12
  • 1
    This question is confusing. Are you working in .NET? The dialogs you included are for Delphi Win32 apps. Are you using Delphi for .NET? If so, you should include that in your tags (and provide info about what compiler options you're using).
    – Ken White
    Feb 16, 2012 at 15:20
  • @KenWhite i am indeed working in .NET. The dialogs i included are for Delphi Win32 apps (i.e. the olden days). This question is for .NET and .NET assemblies. i happen to be working in Visual Studio 2010. Although i suppose any valuable tool could analyze any .NET assembly, no matter the compiler used to create it (including DFDN)
    – Ian Boyd
    Feb 16, 2012 at 15:29
  • As I said, your question was confusing. (It still is, in fact.) You mention an "IDE extension", but that wasn't a VS IDE extension, you mention "build the entire VCL", and show Delphi project dialogs, and don't mention any IDE/language in your tags.
    – Ken White
    Feb 16, 2012 at 15:37
  • @KenWhite It was an inside nod to those who still know about a language that has 4% market share.
    – Ian Boyd
    Feb 16, 2012 at 15:44

1 Answer 1

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The standard SDK took ILDASM (IL Disassembler), had the "Statistics" option in the View menu, which broke it down like this:

 File size            : 3072
 PE header size       : 512 (456 used)    (16.67%)
 PE additional info   : 167               ( 5.44%)
 Num.of PE sections   : 2
 CLR header size     : 72                 ( 2.34%)
 CLR meta-data size  : 1572               (51.17%)
 CLR additional info : 0                  ( 0.00%)
 CLR method headers  : 15                 ( 0.49%)
 Managed code         : 77                ( 2.51%)
 Data                 : 512               (16.67%)
 Unaccounted          : 145               ( 4.72%)

 Num.of PE sections   : 2
   .text    - 2048
   .reloc   - 512

 CLR meta-data size  : 1572
   Module        -    1 (10 bytes)
   TypeDef       -    4 (56 bytes)      0 interfaces, 0 explicit layout
   TypeRef       -   15 (90 bytes)
   MethodDef     -    4 (56 bytes)      0 abstract, 0 native, 4 bodies
   FieldDef      -    2 (12 bytes)      0 constant
   MemberRef     -   15 (90 bytes)
   ParamDef      -    4 (24 bytes)
   CustomAttribute-   13 (78 bytes)
   StandAloneSig -    1 (2 bytes)
   Assembly      -    1 (22 bytes)
   AssemblyRef   -    1 (20 bytes)
   Strings       -   571 bytes
   Blobs         -   336 bytes
   UserStrings   -     8 bytes
   Guids         -    16 bytes
   Uncategorized -   181 bytes

 CLR method headers : 15
   Num.of method bodies  - 4
   Num.of fat headers    - 1
   Num.of tiny headers   - 3

 Managed code : 77
   Ave method size - 19

This should provide a good starting point.

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    Excellent starting point. Today i learned that Visual Studio stores my PNG compressed images as uncompressed BMPs. 1 MB of PNG images takes up 7.5 MB in the final 8MB assembly. sigh
    – Ian Boyd
    Feb 16, 2012 at 16:58
  • @IanBoyd You can have that image be appended as Content instead of as resource in the Properties Menu of the image.
    – balexandre
    Feb 21, 2012 at 12:07
  • @balexandre The "Content" build option means the file will be in the output directory - they won't be embedded within the output assembly. It sounds like the OP should use Manifest Resource Streams to store the PNG data instead.
    – Dai
    Apr 19, 2021 at 3:00

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