76

Is there any way to write a LINQ style "short hand" code for walking to all levels of InnerException(s) of Exception thrown? I would prefer to write it in place instead of calling an extension function (as below) or inheriting the Exception class.

static class Extensions
{
    public static string GetaAllMessages(this Exception exp)
    {
        string message = string.Empty;
        Exception innerException = exp;

        do
        {
            message = message + (string.IsNullOrEmpty(innerException.Message) ? string.Empty : innerException.Message);
            innerException = innerException.InnerException;
        }
        while (innerException != null);

        return message;
    }
}; 
  • 2
    May I ask you why you want to use something else than Extension methods? Your code looks fine to me, and is reusable everywhere in your code. – ken2k Feb 16 '12 at 15:45
  • @ken2k: Though you wouldn't want to build up the messages the way he has it right now... – Jeff Mercado Feb 16 '12 at 16:11
  • 1
    @JeffMercado Yes, but what's the problem with the concept of "extensions method"? – ken2k Feb 16 '12 at 16:12
  • @ken2k: To be honest, I don't really understand your question... you just mentioned that the code "looks fine" when it is flawed. – Jeff Mercado Feb 16 '12 at 16:14
  • Just beware in mind AggregateExceptions behave little different. You will have to walk through InnerExceptions property instead. Provided a handy extension method here: stackoverflow.com/a/52042708/661933 to cover both cases. – nawfal Aug 27 '18 at 15:48

11 Answers 11

80

Unfortunately LINQ doesn't offer methods that could process hierarchical structures, only collections.

I actually have some extension methods that could help do this. I don't have the exact code in hand but they're something like this:

// all error checking left out for brevity

// a.k.a., linked list style enumerator
public static IEnumerable<TSource> FromHierarchy<TSource>(
    this TSource source,
    Func<TSource, TSource> nextItem,
    Func<TSource, bool> canContinue)
{
    for (var current = source; canContinue(current); current = nextItem(current))
    {
        yield return current;
    }
}

public static IEnumerable<TSource> FromHierarchy<TSource>(
    this TSource source,
    Func<TSource, TSource> nextItem)
    where TSource : class
{
    return FromHierarchy(source, nextItem, s => s != null);
}

Then in this case you could do this to enumerate through the exceptions:

public static string GetaAllMessages(this Exception exception)
{
    var messages = exception.FromHierarchy(ex => ex.InnerException)
        .Select(ex => ex.Message);
    return String.Join(Environment.NewLine, messages);
}
73

You mean something like this?

public static class Extensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<Exception> GetInnerExceptions(this Exception ex)
    {
        if (ex == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("ex");
        }

        var innerException = ex;
        do
        {
            yield return innerException;
            innerException = innerException.InnerException;
        }
        while (innerException != null);
    }
}

This way you could LINQ over your entire exceptions hierarchy, like this:

exception.GetInnerExceptions().Where(e => e.Message == "Oops!");
  • 1
    So much cleaner than the proposed solution – Rice Aug 22 '18 at 23:31
28

How about this code:

private static string GetExceptionMessages(this Exception e, string msgs = "")
{
  if (e == null) return string.Empty;
  if (msgs == "") msgs = e.Message;
  if (e.InnerException != null)
    msgs += "\r\nInnerException: " + GetExceptionMessages(e.InnerException);
  return msgs;
}

Usage:

Console.WriteLine(e.GetExceptionMessages())

Example of output:

There was no endpoint listening at http://nnn.mmm.kkk.ppp:8000/routingservice/router that could accept the message. This is often caused by an incorrect address or SOAP action. See InnerException, if present, for more details.

InnerException: Unable to connect to the remote server

InnerException: No connection could be made because the target machine actively refused it 127.0.0.1:8000

  • 3
    You should really consider using StringBuilder here. Also IMO extension method should throw NullReferenceException when invoked on null reference. – dstarkowski Nov 23 '16 at 15:47
20

I know this is obvious, but maybe not for all.

exc.ToString();

This will go through all your inner exceptions and returns all messages, but together with stack trace etc.

  • 3
    Yeh thats fine if your happy to live with all the full stack trace that get blatted with ToString. That often doesn't suit the context e.g if message is going to a user. On the other hand Message does NOT give the inner exception Message (unlike ToString which does recurse). What we most often want is the non existant FullMessage which is all message from parent and inner exceptions. – Ricibob Oct 5 '17 at 13:19
13

You don't need extension methods or recursive calls:

try {
  // Code that throws exception
}
catch (Exception e)
{
  var messages = new List<string>();
  do
  {
    messages.Add(e.Message);
    e = e.InnerException;
  }
  while (e != null) ;
  var message = string.Join(" - ", messages);
}
  • Brilliant! Wish I'd thought about it. – Raul Marquez Nov 11 at 18:24
10

LINQ is generally used to work with collections of objects. However, arguably, in your case there is no collection of objects (but a graph). So even though some LINQ code might be possible, IMHO it would be rather convoluted or artificial.

On the other hand, your example looks like a prime example where extension methods are actually reasonable. Not to speak of issues like reuse, encapsulation, etc.

I would stay with an extension method, although I might have implemented it that way:

public static string GetAllMessages(this Exception ex)
{
   if (ex == null)
     throw new ArgumentNullException("ex");

   StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

   while (ex != null)
   {
      if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(ex.Message))
      {
         if (sb.Length > 0)
           sb.Append(" ");

         sb.Append(ex.Message);
      }

      ex = ex.InnerException;
   }

   return sb.ToString();
}

But that is largely an issue of taste.

6

I don't think so, exception is not an IEnumerable so you can't perform a linq query against one on its own.

An extension method to return the inner exceptions would work like this

public static class ExceptionExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<Exception> InnerExceptions(this Exception exception)
    {
        Exception ex = exception;

        while (ex != null)
        {
            yield return ex;
            ex = ex.InnerException;
        }
    }
}

you could then append all the messages using a linq query like this:

var allMessageText = string.Concat(exception.InnerExceptions().Select(e => e.Message + ","));
6

To add to others, you may want to let the user decide on how to separate the messages:

    public static string GetAllMessages(this Exception ex, string separator = "\r\nInnerException: ")
    {
        if (ex.InnerException == null)
            return ex.Message;

        return ex.Message + separator + GetAllMessages(ex.InnerException, separator);
    }
5
    public static string GetExceptionMessage(Exception ex)
    {
        if (ex.InnerException == null)
        {
            return string.Concat(ex.Message, System.Environment.NewLine, ex.StackTrace);
        }
        else
        {
            // Retira a última mensagem da pilha que já foi retornada na recursividade anterior
            // (senão a última exceção - que não tem InnerException - vai cair no último else, retornando a mesma mensagem já retornada na passagem anterior)
            if (ex.InnerException.InnerException == null)
                return ex.InnerException.Message;
            else
                return string.Concat(string.Concat(ex.InnerException.Message, System.Environment.NewLine, ex.StackTrace), System.Environment.NewLine, GetExceptionMessage(ex.InnerException));
        }
    }
4

I'm just going to leave the most concise version here:

public static class ExceptionExtensions
{
    public static string GetMessageWithInner(this Exception ex) =>
        string.Join($";{ Environment.NewLine }caused by: ",
            GetInnerExceptions(ex).Select(e => $"'{ e.Message }'"));

    public static IEnumerable<Exception> GetInnerExceptions(this Exception ex)
    {
        while (ex != null)
        {
            yield return ex;
            ex = ex.InnerException;
        }
    }
}
3
public static class ExceptionExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<Exception> GetAllExceptions(this Exception ex)
    {
        Exception currentEx = ex;
        yield return currentEx;
        while (currentEx.InnerException != null)
        {
            currentEx = currentEx.InnerException;
            yield return currentEx;
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<string> GetAllExceptionAsString(this Exception ex)
    {            
        Exception currentEx = ex;
        yield return currentEx.ToString();
        while (currentEx.InnerException != null)
        {
            currentEx = currentEx.InnerException;
            yield return currentEx.ToString();
        }            
    }

    public static IEnumerable<string> GetAllExceptionMessages(this Exception ex)
    {
        Exception currentEx = ex;
        yield return currentEx.Message;
        while (currentEx.InnerException != null)
        {
            currentEx = currentEx.InnerException;
            yield return currentEx.Message;
        }
    }
}

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