3

For example, if I call exchangePairs("abcdefg"), I should receive "badcfeg" in return.

This is for a homework assignment, any kind of pseudocode would be very helpful. I am just beginning to learn recursion and up until this problem I haven't had too much of an issue.

7
  • Sorry, my brain can't even comprehend why you approach this problem with recursion!
    – John3136
    Feb 16, 2012 at 23:19
  • 4
    @John3136 - It's very simple: you do it using recursion because the assignment is to do it with recursion.
    – Ted Hopp
    Feb 16, 2012 at 23:22
  • Apart from that, a recursive solution is quite appropriate here. After all, a String is either empty, or it is a character followed by a String. (One can generalize the solution later for lists).
    – Ingo
    Feb 16, 2012 at 23:29
  • 1
    Thanks Ted, I got that. Perhaps I should have kept my mouth shut - but this is a pretty poor example of where to use recursion. Expecting students to grasp the concept of recursion by giving them a problem that is better solved without recursion is quite silly.
    – John3136
    Feb 16, 2012 at 23:32
  • 1
    No, I don't think recursion is difficult. It is very useful when appropriate. Steven's solution below is a great answer to the question (standby for up vote), but daxnitro's is how I would approach this problem. Recursion for recusrion's sake is bad. This is a (correctly tagged) homework question, so fair enough. I just think a better (more natural) problem could have been found. That's all I'll say on it.
    – John3136
    Feb 16, 2012 at 23:44

8 Answers 8

6
public String swapPairs(String s) {
     if (s.length() < 2)
          return s;
     else
          return swap(s.charAt(0), s.charAt(1)) + swapPairs(s.substring(2));
}
1
  • 5
    Now you served him on a silver plate. You're eligible for the "I do your homework" badge.
    – Ingo
    Feb 16, 2012 at 23:36
1

You're not just beginning to learn recursion, because recursion is part of your everyday live. You just don't notice, because it is so normal and nobody calls it recursion.

For example, you watch a movie on TV, and in one scene there is someone watching a movie on TV.

In programming, recursion is a way to make hard things easy. Always start with the easy case:

  • What is the result of exchangePairs("")?
  • What is the result of exchangePairs("x") where x is any character?
  • Suppose you have already completed exchangePairs(), how would the result be for "xy..." where "..." is any string? Surely "yx+++", where "+++" is the result of exchangePairs("...").

Now, it turns out that we've covered all cases! Problem solved! Such is the greatness of recursion. You just use your function as if it were complete despite you've not completed it yet.

0

Why use recursion?

for (int i = 0; i + 1 < strlen(str); ++i) {
    char tmp = str[i + 1];
    str[i + 1] = str[i];
    str[i] = tmp;
} 

If you have to use recursion, I suppose you could do something like this:

char* exchangePairs(char* str) {
    if (strlen(str) >= 2) {
        // if there are characters left, swap the first two, then recurse
        char tmp = str[1];
        str[1] = str[0];
        str[0] = str[1];

        exchangePairs(str + 2);
    }

    return str;
}

That's in C, but it should give you the idea (I'm better in C and didn't want to just give you a copy/pasteable solution).

3
  • This is supposed to be Java, not C. There is no such thing as char *.
    – Ted Hopp
    Feb 16, 2012 at 23:23
  • I'm not an idiot. The guy wasn't asking for a solution. He was asking for a nudge in the right direction. He said any type of pseudocode was fine. This is exactly what he was looking for.
    – daxnitro
    Feb 16, 2012 at 23:25
  • Fair enough. I guess a C language solution qualifies as Java pseudocode.
    – Ted Hopp
    Feb 16, 2012 at 23:29
0

Use tail recursion

String reverse(String input)
{
   if(String.length()==1)
   {
     return input;
   }
   else
   {
      return reverse(input,"");
   }
}

String reverse(String input, String result)
{
   if(input.length == 0) return result;
   else return result(input.substring(1),input.charAt(0) + result);
}
1
  • I'd say tail recursion is a step too far for someone just starting on the basics of recursion.
    – Steven
    Feb 16, 2012 at 23:30
0

Ok Here is my solution. I dont have Java at my disposal so I did it in C# which is very similar to Java so should be easy to understand/port;

 public static char[] exchangePairs(char[] charArray, int current)
        {
            if(current >= charArray.Length - 1)
            {
                return charArray;
            }

            char nextChar = charArray[current + 1];
            char currentChar = charArray[current];

            charArray[current] = nextChar;
            charArray[current + 1] = currentChar;

            int i = current + 2;

            return exchangePairs(charArray, i);
        }

Call to the method:

exchangePairs("abcdefghij".ToCharArray(), 0);

0
public static String swapPairs(String s) {
    String even = "";
    String odd = "";
    int length = s.length();

    for (int i = 0; i <= length-2; i+=2) {          
        even += s.charAt(i+1) + "" + s.charAt(i);
    }

    if (length % 2 != 0) {          
        odd = even + s.charAt(length-1);
        return odd;
    } else {
        return even;
    }
}
0
0

A small adding on Steven's solution, you can use StringBuffer/StringBuilder.reverse() for reversing a string.

 public String swapPairs(String s) {
    if (s.length() < 2)
        return s;
    else {
        return new StringBuffer(s.substring(0, 2)).reverse().toString() + swapPairs(s.substring(2));
    }
}
-2

I'd introduce an integer recursion control variable which is how much of the string has already been exchanged. At each level, check the control variable to see if there's more to do and, if so, exchange the next pair, increment by 2, and recurse.

1
  • No need for that. All strings already have this control variable, it is called .length
    – Ingo
    Feb 16, 2012 at 23:33

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