204

I'm new at postgres (and at database info systems all in all). I ran following sql script on my database:

create table cities (
id serial primary key,
name text not null
);

create table reports (
id serial primary key,
cityid integer not null references cities(id),
reportdate date not null,
reporttext text not null
);

create user www with password 'www';

grant select on cities to www;
grant insert on cities to www;
grant delete on cities to www;

grant select on reports to www;
grant insert on reports to www;
grant delete on reports to www;

grant select on cities_id_seq to www;
grant insert on cities_id_seq to www;
grant delete on cities_id_seq to www;

grant select on reports_id_seq to www;
grant insert on reports_id_seq to www;
grant delete on reports_id_seq to www;

When, as the user www, trying to:

insert into cities (name) values ('London');

I get the following error:

ERROR: permission denied for sequence cities_id_seq

I get that the problem lies with the serial type. That's why I grant select, insert and delete rights for the *_id_seq to www. Yet this does not fix my problem. What am I missing?

  • 2
    Granting insert/delete on a sequence does not make sense to me. I'm surprised that it even works. – a_horse_with_no_name Feb 17 '12 at 13:02
364
0

Since PostgreSQL 8.2 you have to use:

GRANT USAGE, SELECT ON SEQUENCE cities_id_seq TO www;

GRANT USAGE - For sequences, this privilege allows the use of the currval and nextval functions.

Also as pointed out by @epic_fil in the comments you can grant permissions to all the sequences in the schema with:

GRANT USAGE, SELECT ON ALL SEQUENCES IN SCHEMA public TO www;
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  • 52
    FYI, the syntax ". . . ON ALL SEQUENCES IN SCHEMA schema_name" is also supported. – epic_fil Feb 12 '13 at 22:00
  • 5
    Interesting. I did a GRANT all on the table that my sequence is in, but this doesn't seem to cover the sequence. This also seems to very by OS. – Kinnard Hockenhull Jun 7 '14 at 15:48
  • 44
    How is this a real thing? When would I ever want to allow a user to insert data into a table but NOT want to allow them to use the the fact that one of the columns is auto-incrementing? – Brett Widmeier Dec 7 '16 at 14:27
  • 5
    IS SELECT necessary? Shouldn't USAGE cover what's needed? – Tᴀʀᴇǫ Mᴀʜᴍᴏᴏᴅ Dec 10 '17 at 8:35
  • 7
    @BrettWidmeier Exactly. It's stupefying to me how this sort of thing is tolerated by the developers. It's like people want to roam around the Internet and read bottomless StackOverflow threads in attempt to fix things that should have been working right out of the box. – milosmns Apr 6 '18 at 15:19
68
0

Since @Phil has a comment getting a lot of upvotes which might not get noticed, I'm using his syntax to add an answer that will grant permissions to a user for all sequences in a schema (assuming your schema is the default 'public')

GRANT USAGE, SELECT ON ALL SEQUENCES IN SCHEMA public to www;
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  • 2
    Note that this only works in PostgreSQL 9.0 and up, to accomplish the same in 8 you could do something like: SELECT 'GRANT USAGE, SELECT ON ' || quote_ident(schemaname) || '.' || quote_ident(relname) || ' TO www;' FROM pg_statio_all_sequences WHERE schemaname = 'public'; – Tom Gerken 2 days ago – Tom Gerken Feb 18 '16 at 17:25
39
0

@Tom_Gerken, @epic_fil and @kupson are quite correct with their statements to give permissions to work with existing sequences. However, the user will NOT get access rights to sequences created in the future. To do that, you have to combine the GRANT statement with an ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES statement, like so:

GRANT USAGE, SELECT ON ALL SEQUENCES IN SCHEMA public TO www;
ALTER DEFAULT PRIVILEGES IN SCHEMA public
    GRANT USAGE, SELECT ON SEQUENCES TO www;

This only works on PostgreSQL 9+, of course.

This will append to existing default privileges, not overwrite them, so is quite safe in that regard.

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-2
0

Execute the following command in postgres.

login to postgres:

sudo su postgres;

psql dbname;

CREATE SEQUENCE public.cities_id_seq INCREMENT 1
MINVALUE 0
MAXVALUE 1
START 1 CACHE 1; ALTER TABLE public.cities_id_seq OWNER TO pgowner;

pgowner will be your database user.

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