199

Given a StackPanel:

<StackPanel>
  <TextBox Height="30">Apple</TextBox>
  <TextBox Height="80">Banana</TextBox>
  <TextBox Height="120">Cherry</TextBox>
</StackPanel>

What's the best way to space out the child elements so that there are equally-sized gaps between them, even though the child elements themselves are of different sizes? Can it be done without setting properties on each of the individual children?

1
  • Really just adding padding to individual items seems to be best option.
    – zar
    Jan 24 '20 at 21:36

11 Answers 11

303

Use Margin or Padding, applied to the scope within the container:

<StackPanel>
    <StackPanel.Resources>
        <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}">
            <Setter Property="Margin" Value="0,10,0,0"/>
        </Style>
    </StackPanel.Resources> 
    <TextBox Text="Apple"/>
    <TextBox Text="Banana"/>
    <TextBox Text="Cherry"/>
</StackPanel>

EDIT: In case you would want to re-use the margin between two containers, you can convert the margin value to a resource in an outer scope, f.e.

<Window.Resources>
    <Thickness x:Key="tbMargin">0,10,0,0</Thickness>
</Window.Resources>

and then refer to this value in the inner scope

<StackPanel.Resources>
    <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}">
        <Setter Property="Margin" Value="{StaticResource tbMargin}"/>
    </Style>
</StackPanel.Resources>
9
  • 7
    The scoped Style is an awesome way to do that - thanks for the tip!
    – Ana Betts
    May 31 '09 at 18:41
  • 2
    What if i want to use it for entire project ?
    – grv_9098
    Nov 28 '12 at 13:09
  • 11
    Can someone explain why this only works when you explicitly define the type (e.g. TextBox)? If I try this using FrameworkElement so that all children are spaced, it has no effect. Jan 28 '14 at 18:48
  • 5
    This doesn't work well if you've already defined a style for Button. Feb 4 '15 at 13:50
  • 2
    As a side note, if you want to do this with a Label you have to use Padding instead of Margin Sep 30 '15 at 19:44
90

Another nice approach can be seen here: http://blogs.microsoft.co.il/blogs/eladkatz/archive/2011/05/29/what-is-the-easiest-way-to-set-spacing-between-items-in-stackpanel.aspx Link is broken -> this is webarchive of this link.

It shows how to create an attached behavior, so that syntax like this would work:

<StackPanel local:MarginSetter.Margin="5">
   <TextBox Text="hello" />
   <Button Content="hello" />
   <Button Content="hello" />
</StackPanel>

This is the easiest & fastest way to set Margin to several children of a panel, even if they are not of the same type. (I.e. Buttons, TextBoxes, ComboBoxes, etc.)

7
  • 5
    This is a pretty interesting way to go about this. It makes a lot of assumptions about exactly how you want to space things, and even gives you an opportunity to automatically adjust the margins on the first/last items.
    – Armentage
    Jun 23 '11 at 4:40
  • 2
    +1 for versatility. Also to improve on the blog post, adding if (fe.ReadLocalValue(FrameworkElement.MarginProperty) == DependencyProperty.UnsetValue) before actually setting the margin of the child it allows to manually specify margins for some elements.
    – Xerillio
    Aug 11 '16 at 23:31
  • Note that this doesn't work if the child items are added/removed dynamically, such as in an ItemsControl bound to a changing collection. Oct 9 '17 at 14:57
  • 1
    In case it doesn't work: Build the project, otherwise it won't render the page.
    – Battle
    Sep 3 '19 at 12:54
  • 3
    Link is broken!
    – Dave
    Jan 21 '20 at 19:31
15

I improved on Elad Katz' answer.

  • Add LastItemMargin property to MarginSetter to specially handle the last item
  • Add Spacing attached property with Vertical and Horizontal properties that adds spacing between items in vertical and horizontal lists and eliminates any trailing margin at the end of the list

Source code in gist.

Example:

<StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal" foo:Spacing.Horizontal="5">
  <Button>Button 1</Button>
  <Button>Button 2</Button>
</StackPanel>

<StackPanel Orientation="Vertical" foo:Spacing.Vertical="5">
  <Button>Button 1</Button>
  <Button>Button 2</Button>
</StackPanel>

<!-- Same as vertical example above -->
<StackPanel Orientation="Vertical" foo:MarginSetter.Margin="0 0 0 5" foo:MarginSetter.LastItemMargin="0">
  <Button>Button 1</Button>
  <Button>Button 2</Button>
</StackPanel>
3
  • Like Elad's answer, this doesn't work if the child items are added/removed dynamically, such as in an ItemsControl bound to a changing collection. It assumes the items are static from the moment the parent's Load event fires. Oct 9 '17 at 14:59
  • Also, your gist gives a 404. Oct 9 '17 at 14:59
  • Updated link to gist.
    – angularsen
    Oct 9 '17 at 20:29
9

The thing you really want to do is wrap all child elements. In this case you should use an items control and not resort to horrible attached properties which you will end up having a million of for every property you wish to style.

<ItemsControl>

    <!-- target the wrapper parent of the child with a style -->
    <ItemsControl.ItemContainerStyle>
        <Style TargetType="Control">
            <Setter Property="Margin" Value="0 0 5 0"></Setter>
        </Style>
    </ItemsControl.ItemContainerStyle>

    <!-- use a stack panel as the main container -->
    <ItemsControl.ItemsPanel>
        <ItemsPanelTemplate>
            <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal"/>
        </ItemsPanelTemplate>
    </ItemsControl.ItemsPanel>

    <!-- put in your children -->
    <ItemsControl.Items>
        <Label>Auto Zoom Reset?</Label>
        <CheckBox x:Name="AutoResetZoom"/>
        <Button x:Name="ProceedButton" Click="ProceedButton_OnClick">Next</Button>
        <ComboBox SelectedItem="{Binding LogLevel }" ItemsSource="{Binding LogLevels}" />
    </ItemsControl.Items>
</ItemsControl>

enter image description here

3
  • Great tip, but this works better with the Style TargetType as "FrameworkElement" (otherwise it doesn't work for Image, for example)
    – Puffin
    Feb 3 '16 at 23:47
  • 1
    I like this idea. Just one addition: subtracting the amount of spacing from the margin of the StackPanel (Margin="0 0 -5 0") will also counter the spacing after the last item in the list.
    – label17
    Apr 17 '16 at 21:04
  • The problem with this is that the style you set will override any other styles that you may already have on the Items. To overcome this see this related question/accepted answer here Jun 3 '16 at 14:11
6

+1 for Sergey's answer. And if you want to apply that to all your StackPanels you can do this:

<Style TargetType="{x:Type StackPanel}">
    <Style.Resources>
        <Style TargetType="{x:Type TextBox}">
            <Setter Property="Margin" Value="{StaticResource tbMargin}"/>
        </Style>
    </Style.Resources>
</Style>

But beware: if you define a style like this in your App.xaml (or another dictionary that is merged into the Application.Resources) it can override the default style of the control. For mostly lookless controls like the stackpanel it isn't a problem, but for textboxes etc you may stumble upon this problem, which luckily has some workarounds.

4
  • <Style.Resources> Are u sure about it coz when i tried this it was showing error.
    – grv_9098
    Nov 29 '12 at 9:50
  • Sorry, I can't remember off-hand. I'll have to try it myself to see. I'll get back to you.
    – Andre Luus
    Nov 29 '12 at 14:01
  • Yes, it does work. Just did the same to set TextWeight="Bold" on all TextBlocks in a StackPanel. Only difference was I set the style explicitly on the StackPanel.
    – Andre Luus
    Nov 30 '12 at 7:05
  • Thanks for ur concern but I still have doubt.I know about that It called Scope Style. I guess it will be <StackPanel.Resources> and not <Style.Resources> . It will be more great if you can paste the code piece of your...
    – grv_9098
    Nov 30 '12 at 10:26
3

Following up on Sergey's suggestion, you can define and reuse a whole Style (with various property setters, including Margin) instead of just a Thickness object:

<Style x:Key="MyStyle" TargetType="SomeItemType">
  <Setter Property="Margin" Value="0,5,0,5" />
  ...
</Style>

...

  <StackPanel>
    <StackPanel.Resources>
      <Style TargetType="SomeItemType" BasedOn="{StaticResource MyStyle}" />
    </StackPanel.Resources>
  ...
  </StackPanel>

Note that the trick here is the use of Style Inheritance for the implicit style, inheriting from the style in some outer (probably merged from external XAML file) resource dictionary.

Sidenote:

At first, I naively tried to use the implicit style to set the Style property of the control to that outer Style resource (say defined with the key "MyStyle"):

<StackPanel>
  <StackPanel.Resources>
    <Style TargetType="SomeItemType">
      <Setter Property="Style" Value={StaticResource MyStyle}" />
    </Style>
  </StackPanel.Resources>
</StackPanel>

which caused Visual Studio 2010 to shut down immediately with CATASTROPHIC FAILURE error (HRESULT: 0x8000FFFF (E_UNEXPECTED)), as described at https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/753211/xaml-editor-window-fails-with-catastrophic-failure-when-a-style-tries-to-set-style-property#

3

Grid.ColumnSpacing, Grid.RowSpacing, StackPanel.Spacing are now on UWP preview, all will allow to better acomplish what is requested here.

These properties are currently only available with the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update Insider SDK, but should make it to the final bits!

2

The UniformGrid might not be available in Silverlight, but someone has ported it from WPF. http://www.jeff.wilcox.name/2009/01/uniform-grid/

2

My approach inherits StackPanel.

Usage:

<Controls:ItemSpacer Grid.Row="2" Orientation="Horizontal" Height="30" CellPadding="15,0">
    <Label>Test 1</Label>
    <Label>Test 2</Label>
    <Label>Test 3</Label>
</Controls:ItemSpacer>

All that's needed is the following short class:

using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System;

namespace Controls
{
    public class ItemSpacer : StackPanel
    {
        public static DependencyProperty CellPaddingProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("CellPadding", typeof(Thickness), typeof(ItemSpacer), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(default(Thickness), FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.BindsTwoWayByDefault, OnCellPaddingChanged));
        public Thickness CellPadding
        {
            get
            {
                return (Thickness)GetValue(CellPaddingProperty);
            }
            set
            {
                SetValue(CellPaddingProperty, value);
            }
        }
        private static void OnCellPaddingChanged(DependencyObject Object, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            ((ItemSpacer)Object).SetPadding();
        }

        private void SetPadding()
        {
            foreach (UIElement Element in Children)
            {
                (Element as FrameworkElement).Margin = this.CellPadding;
            }
        }

        public ItemSpacer()
        {
            this.LayoutUpdated += PART_Host_LayoutUpdated;
        }

        private void PART_Host_LayoutUpdated(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
        {
            this.SetPadding();
        }
    }
}
1

Usually, I use Grid instead of StackPanel like this:

horizontal case

<Grid>
 <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
    <ColumnDefinition Width="auto"/>
    <ColumnDefinition Width="*"/>
    <ColumnDefinition  Width="auto"/>
    <ColumnDefinition Width="*"/>
    <ColumnDefinition  Width="auto"/>
 </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
 <TextBox Height="30" Grid.Column="0">Apple</TextBox>
 <TextBox Height="80" Grid.Column="2">Banana</TextBox>
 <TextBox Height="120" Grid.Column="4">Cherry</TextBox>
</Grid>

vertical case

<Grid>
     <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <RowDefinition Width="auto"/>
        <RowDefinition Width="*"/>
        <RowDefinition  Width="auto"/>
        <RowDefinition Width="*"/>
        <RowDefinition  Width="auto"/>
     </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
     <TextBox Height="30" Grid.Row="0">Apple</TextBox>
     <TextBox Height="80" Grid.Row="2">Banana</TextBox>
     <TextBox Height="120" Grid.Row="4">Cherry</TextBox>
</Grid>
0

sometimes you need to set Padding, not Margin to make space between items smaller than default

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.