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I have a multi-threaded application which uses shared data structure, which wraps std::map.

I know that STL is not thread-safe and it's my job to synchronize all threads. Also I think that inserting and removing elements from list doesn't invalidate the iterators to the other elements.

So I've got per-element locks in my code, which guards from the case 'two threads reading/writing to the same element. Let's that two threads work on two different objects. They hold locks for the objects so the other threads can't modify/remove their objects.

However 3rd thread at the same time tries to remove 3rd different object. She has acquired lock for it so no other thread will attempt to read write or remove it.

Is it thread-safe to remove element from map while other threads are reading/writing to other elements of the map?

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  • Did you take scalability into account? If there are a lot of elements in your map, there will be a lot of mutexes. Is the time needed to access an element big enough for the need of all the mutexes? If you can have one mutex for the entire map, then your problem is already solved.
    – stefaanv
    Feb 17, 2012 at 10:29
  • Each structure in the map contains data about a pending phone call. It's guaranteed that I'll have got no more than 2000 structures(mutexes) at worst case scenario. It's critical to keep the available for all concurent calls, so I think it's better to have 2k mutexes than one for the whole structure. However you've got a point - it's worth to check this option too. Feb 17, 2012 at 11:12

3 Answers 3

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Please note that you knowledge that the STL containers are not thread-safe is wrong! In C++2011 the container provide reasonable thread-safety guarantees. They may be different from what you might wish for but they are reasonable and important:

  1. If there is not thread modifying the structure of the container, there can be concurrent threads which read the structure of the same container object.
  2. If there is a writer for the structure of a container, there shall be no other accesses to the container.
  3. Different objects are independent and concurrent access of different container objects doesn't require synchronization.

These guarantees mean that you don't need any synchronization for the container if multiple threads just access the container but don't change its structure. Since the elements are provided by the user they may need individual sychronization depending on theirown thread-safety guarantees. If there are threads modifying the structure of a container, it is necessary to properly synchronize the accesses.

For your case you have to make sure that no thread reads the map while the is some thread modifying it. Since iterators and references to objects are not invalidated, it is OK to access an element in the map via an iterator or a reference even while the map is modified - unless, of course, the element may be removed.

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  • I agree, my statement is misleading. Thanks for the clarifications. Feb 17, 2012 at 13:15
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No. As Diemtar Kühl has pointed out, you need a lock on the container, which must be acquired anytime you access the container. So your scenario for most access would be (C is the container lock, O the lock for an individual object:

acquire C
find object
acquire O
release C
process object
release O

and if you delete, either:

acquire C
find object
acquire O
delete object
release O
release C

, or if you need to process first before deciding to delete:

acquire C
find object
acquire O
release C
process, determine that deletion is needed
acquire C
release O
release C

This creates several problems. The most obvious is that RAII cannot be used to manage the locks, at least not in its natural fashion. (It can still be used to ensure that the locks are freed in case of an exception, but the release of the container lock in the first scenario must be manual.) More importantly, it is subject to deadlock in at least two cases:

  • If your threads need to access more than one object at a time. In this case, in the first scenario, you have thread 1 which acquires C, then acquires O1, then releases C. Following that thread 2 acquires C, then blocks on O1. Thread 1 then resumes, and decides that it also needs to access object 2. So it tries to acquire C, and blocks, waiting for thread 2 to release it. (Thread 2 is, of course, blocked until thread 1 releases O1.)

  • If you're using the second scenario for deletion, then it's sufficient that a second thread attempt to access the object you're working on while you are processing it. As above, the second thread will block on O (which the first thread holds), and the first thread will block on C (the second acquire C in the scenario). And neither thread will go anywhere, both waiting for the other one to proceed.

If no thread every locks more than one object, and the first scenario is used for delete, the pattern will work. But it is very fragile—it's too easy to imagine a maintenance programmer violating one of these conditions—and I would strongly recommend against it. (Of course, if none of the alternatives provide sufficient throughput, you may have to use it. And even the second scenario for delete can be made to work if you release O before attempting the second acquisition of C, then reacquire O, once you have C. The key conditions are that you must always acquire C, then O in that order, and that you never try to acquire C when you have an O.)

Also note that having each object contain a mutex can be tricky, since you have to hold the mutex until after the object has been removed from the map. This means that either the map itself holds pointer to the objects (and keep a pointer to the object after removing it from the map, and free the lock and delete the object through this pointer), or that the object keeps the a pointer to the mutex.

The simplest solution is to just use a single lock on C, and maintain it during the processing of O. If the processing isn't too long, this might be acceptable; if the reason you're using multithreading is to be able to process on several cores simultaneously, this won't work.

Failing that, you might want to consider using a rwlock on the container, and holding on to it for the entire time you hold O. Simple access can then proceed, since it's only a read access, and the lock allows multiple read accesses. For delete, you'll need a write access, which will block until all read accesses have finished; you'll also still need the special handling for the second scenario of deletion, since attempting to upgrade the access from read to write can cause deadlock, exactly as described above. (To upgrade from read to write, it is necessary that no other thread hold read access.)

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  • Looks like the 'C' lock is what I'm missing in my code. As I know what the max count of objects might be in my structure (and I use integer as a key) it's not a problem in my case to have mutexes for each element. Thank you too for the detailed explanation. Feb 17, 2012 at 13:17
  • That's not what he pointed out at all. His answer ends it is OK to access an element in the map via an iterator or a reference even while the map is modified - unless, of course, the element may be removed. Feb 17, 2012 at 13:54
  • Yes, but it's not OK to look for an element in the map while other thread is deleting from it. That's why there should be a lock for the entire container. Right? Feb 17, 2012 at 14:01
  • @tsurko Right. That's what Dietmar pointed out in his answer, but he didn't go into the details of the possible deadlocks. IMHO, anytime you have a thread acquiring more than one lock at a time, you have to take into account possible deadlocks, and do the analysis to be sure that they don't occur. Feb 17, 2012 at 14:48
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Is it thread-safe to remove element from map while other threads are reading/writing to other elements of the map?

It should be, as long as the element you're reading/writing to is not the element being removed.

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    It is a common pattern to have one lock for the collection and separate locks for objects in it. You lock the collection, find the object you're interested in, lock the object, unlock the collection, manipulate the object, and then unlock the object. Just make sure never to try to acquire the collection lock while holding locks on any objects in the collection. Feb 17, 2012 at 10:29
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    @DavidSchwartz It may be a common pattern, but it requires some care. In particular, you must never attempt to access the container while you have a lock on one of its elements---if another thread is attempting to access the object for which you have a lock, there will be a deadlock. (In general, I don't think that this is a very good pattern. Too error prone.) Feb 17, 2012 at 12:24
  • @JamesKanze I know this is an old post - but this is precisely the problem I have. What is a better pattern since this is error prone?
    – sccs
    Apr 26, 2013 at 6:56
  • @sccs It depends on the application: what it does with the extracted element, etc. The simplest solution would be to just use the lock on the entire collection, and hold it when you need a lock on any individual object. This is really only acceptable, however, if the operations on the individual objects, once found, are extremely short. Alternatively, you can use a try lock for the individual objects, and back out and try later if it fails (possibly managing some sort of request list, if fairness becomes an issue). (But you might ask this as a question.) Apr 26, 2013 at 7:56

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