7

I realized that the curly braces for a hash can be omitted if it is the last element in an array. For example, the forms:

[1, 2, 3, :a => 'A', :b => 'B']
[1, 2, 3, a: 'A', b: 'B']

seem to be identical to:

[1, 2, 3, {:a => 'A', :b => 'B'}]
[1, 2, 3, {a: 'A', b: 'B'}]

I knew this kind of omission is possible for arguments of a method, but had not noted it is possible for an array. Is my understanding of this rule correct? And, is this described somewhere?

  • 2
    I suppose that in theory, [...] is a method call to a method that looks like def x(*args) so the behavior makes some sense. Maybe dig up the array literal handling C code to see how it is handled internally. – mu is too short Feb 17 '12 at 19:59
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    I wouldn't use it as a coding practice though. I prefer seeing the visual delimiting provided by { and }, and would state that in a code review. It's a maintenance and readability issue. – the Tin Man Feb 17 '12 at 20:11
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    @theTinMan It should depend on the situation. I have a DSL, in which things are written using nested arrays and hashes. At the end of each array, some of the object to be specirfied with that part of the array can have its properties specified by a hash, and it is so frequent that if this omission is possible, it makes a huge difference. – sawa Feb 17 '12 at 20:18
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    You misunderstand what I'm saying. [1,2,3,:a => 'b'] is, in some sense, a method call to an array constructor method so of course it behaves like every other method call and auto-hashifies its arguments. – mu is too short Feb 17 '12 at 20:23
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    I can tell you that it does not work in 1.8.6 or 1.8.7, but does in 1.9.1. – Phrogz Feb 17 '12 at 20:43
4

This would seem to be a new feature of 1.9:

$ rvm use 1.8.7
$ irb
ruby-1.8.7-p352 :001 > x = [ 1,2,3,:a => 4, :b => 5 ]
SyntaxError: compile error
(irb):1: syntax error, unexpected tASSOC, expecting ']'
x = [ 1,2,3,:a => 4, :b => 5 ]
                 ^
  from (irb):1
ruby-1.8.7-p352 :002 > exit
$ rvm use 1.9.3
$ irb
ruby-1.9.3-p0 :001 > x = [ 1,2,3,:a => 4, :b => 5 ]
 => [1, 2, 3, {:a=>4, :b=>5}] 
ruby-1.9.3-p0 :002 >
| improve this answer | |
  • Note that cases where the array contains only hashes do work in 1.8.x: ruby 1.8.6-p420 :001 > x = [ :a => 4, :b => 5 ] => [{:a=>4, :b=>5}] – Gabe Kopley Nov 22 '17 at 23:23
-1

I think the brackets (and no brackets, like below) are called hash literals and ruby just tries to fit it as an array element.

>> [1, 2, c: 'd', e: 'f'] # ruby 1.9 hash literals
=> [1, 2, {:c=>"d", :e=>"f"}]

But there aren't more rules to it, I think - you can't do this:

>> [1, 2, c: 'd', e: 'f', 5] # syntax error, unexpected `]` (waiting for => or :)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The type that is returned isn't a Hash, but an Array, so it's an Array literal with an embedded Hash literal – davetron5000 Mar 10 '12 at 13:15
  • yes, that's right. were you hoping for a hash literal like this: a: b, c: d? – farnoy Mar 10 '12 at 19:01

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