70

I need to store weak references to objects in an NSArray, in order to prevent retain cycles. I'm not sure of the proper syntax to use. Is this the correct way?

Foo* foo1 = [[Foo alloc] init];
Foo* foo2 = [[Foo alloc] init];

__unsafe_unretained Foo* weakFoo1 = foo1;
__unsafe_unretained Foo* weakFoo2 = foo2;

NSArray* someArray = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:weakFoo1, weakFoo2, nil];

Note that I need to support iOS 4.x, thus the __unsafe_unretained instead of __weak.


EDIT (2015-02-18):

For those wanting to use true __weak pointers (not __unsafe_unretained), please check out this question instead: Collections of zeroing weak references under ARC

4
  • 13
    "I pity the weak foo!" Feb 17, 2012 at 22:27
  • 4
    I'd suggest to not-fight-the-framework and use NSPointerArray with the NSPointerFunctionsWeakMemory NSPointerFunctionOption
    – leviathan
    Jun 6, 2013 at 8:17
  • 1
    @leviathan: This question was asked before iOS 6 came out. Jun 7, 2013 at 3:33
  • I created this to be a dictionary that stores objects as effectively zeroing weak references. It could be modified (and cleaned up) to serve your purposes. Aug 24, 2013 at 7:03

12 Answers 12

75

As Jason said, you can't make NSArray store weak references. The easiest way to implement Emile's suggestion of wrapping an object inside another object that stores a weak reference to it is the following:

NSValue *value = [NSValue valueWithNonretainedObject:myObj];
[array addObject:value];

Another option: a category that makes NSMutableArray optionally store weak references.

Note that these are "unsafe unretained" references, not self-zeroing weak references. If the array is still around after the objects are deallocated, you'll have a bunch of junk pointers.

7
  • My pleasure! Also, check out my updated answer for another option.
    – yuji
    Feb 17, 2012 at 23:02
  • I think a category on NSMutableArray is a bad idea, since it's a class cluster and you'll be going down a long rabithole of issues. Far better to create your own NSObject subclass that has all the same methods as NSMutableArray. Feb 18, 2012 at 0:16
  • 1
    Have you looked at the actual solution I linked to? I'm no expert on NSMutableArray and class clusters, but it seems to be setting up an additional factory method that use a specific backing store, while not affecting any of the other class methods.
    – yuji
    Feb 18, 2012 at 0:22
  • 17
    NOTE: these aren't self-zeroing weak references. They just don't get retained.
    – mxcl
    Oct 22, 2012 at 17:12
  • Yeah, as @mxcl said, these are unsafe unretained, not weak. So it will crash if you will try to unwrap the value after it's deallocated. Use NSMapTable and NSHashTable instead. Jun 30, 2014 at 7:03
59

The solutions to use a NSValue helper or to create a collection (array, set, dict) object and disable its Retain/Release callbacks are both not 100% failsafe solutions with regard to using ARC.

As various comments to these suggestions point out, such object references will not work like true weak refs:

A "proper" weak property, as supported by ARC, has two behaviors:

  1. Doesn't hold a strong ref to the target object. That means that if the object has no strong references pointing to it, the object will be deallocated.
  2. If the ref'd object is deallocated, the weak reference will become nil.

Now, while the above solutions will comply with behavior #1, they do not exhibit #2.

To get behavior #2 as well, you have to declare your own helper class. It has just one weak property for holding your reference. You then add this helper object to the collection.

Oh, and one more thing: iOS6 and OSX 10.8 supposedly offer a better solution:

[NSHashTable weakObjectsHashTable]
[NSPointerArray weakObjectsPointerArray]
[NSPointerArray pointerArrayWithOptions:]

These should give you containers that hold weak references (but note matt's comments below).

An example (updated 2 Feb 2022)

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

static BOOL didDealloc = NO;

@interface TestClass : NSObject
@end

@implementation TestClass
-(void)dealloc {
    didDealloc = YES;
}
@end

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    NSPointerArray *pa = [NSPointerArray weakObjectsPointerArray];
    @autoreleasepool {
        TestClass *obj = TestClass.new;
        [pa addPointer:(__bridge void * _Nullable)(obj)]; // stores obj as a weak ref
        assert([pa pointerAtIndex:0] != nil);
        assert(!didDealloc);
    } // at this point the TestClass obj will be deallocated
    assert(didDealloc);
    assert([pa pointerAtIndex:0] == nil); // verify that the weak ref is null now
    return 0;
}

If you run this you'll find that after adding the TestClass object to the pointer array pa, then releasing that object again, the pointer (which is internally a weak object ref) is now set to null as desired.

However, note that calling [pa compact] at the end will not remove the nil pointer as I'd have expected.

10
  • [NSPointer weakObjectsPointerArray] on iOS 6 is still not ARC __weak references. So this is not a better solution: like the solutions you critique, it complies with behavior #1 but not #2. It's elegant and convenient, but it's not ARC __weak references.
    – matt
    Nov 30, 2012 at 5:31
  • @matt How did you find that weakObjectsPointerArray does not return __weak refs? Did you test it in code or do you refer to the "NSPointerArray Class Reference" documentation saying "Important: NSPointerArray does not support weak references under Automatic Reference Counting (ARC)."? I had wondered if that wasn't just a leftover from pre-10.8 times and is a documentation error. Nov 30, 2012 at 9:22
  • 1
    Well, I never imagined that a huge warning in a box would be "just a leftover". The references are clearly weak, and they are clearly made NULL when the object has been released, but I don't know how to test that they are __weak in the full ARC sense. I'll ask.
    – matt
    Nov 30, 2012 at 15:48
  • 2
    If they become NULL when their object gets dealloc'd, then they fit my behavior #2, and then all is good. Before ARC, a weak ref was just a pointer (type id) that was left dangling once its referenced object got deallocated. ARC's weak ref is smarter in the way that it then becomes NULL, making it safer to use. So, if that's the behavior you see, then the warning box in the docs is indeed a mistake. I had also sent a feedback about this, asking them to double check. Unfortunately, they (Apple) don't give you feedback :( Dec 4, 2012 at 10:36
  • 2
    BTW, If you look into NSHashTable header for + (NSHashTable *)weakObjectsHashTable; you'll find a comment: // entries are not necessarily purged right away when the weak object is reclaimed. Mar 23, 2015 at 8:14
28

I am new to objective-C, after 20 years of writing c++.

In my view, objective-C is excellent at loosely-coupled messaging, but horrible for data management.

Imagine how happy I was to discover that xcode 4.3 supports objective-c++!

So now I rename all my .m files to .mm (compiles as objective-c++) and use c++ standard containers for data management.

Thus the "array of weak pointers" problem becomes a std::vector of __weak object pointers:

#include <vector>

@interface Thing : NSObject
@end

// declare my vector
std::vector<__weak Thing*> myThings;

// store a weak reference in it
Thing* t = [Thing new];
myThings.push_back(t);

// ... some time later ...

for(auto weak : myThings) {
  Thing* strong = weak; // safely lock the weak pointer
  if (strong) {
    // use the locked pointer
  }
}

Which is equivalent to the c++ idiom:

std::vector< std::weak_ptr<CppThing> > myCppThings;
std::shared_ptr<CppThing> p = std::make_shared<CppThing>();
myCppThings.push_back(p);

// ... some time later ...

for(auto weak : myCppThings) {
  auto strong = weak.lock(); // safety is enforced in c++, you can't dereference a weak_ptr
  if (strong) {
    // use the locked pointer
  }
}

Proof of concept (in the light of Tommy's concerns about vector reallocation):

main.mm:

#include <vector>
#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Thing : NSObject
@end

@implementation Thing


@end

extern void foo(Thing*);

int main()
{
    // declare my vector
    std::vector<__weak Thing*> myThings;

    // store a weak reference in it while causing reallocations
    Thing* t = [[Thing alloc]init];
    for (int i = 0 ; i < 100000 ; ++i) {
        myThings.push_back(t);
    }
    // ... some time later ...

    foo(myThings[5000]);

    t = nullptr;

    foo(myThings[5000]);
}

void foo(Thing*p)
{
    NSLog(@"%@", [p className]);
}

example log output:

2016-09-21 18:11:13.150 foo2[42745:5048189] Thing
2016-09-21 18:11:13.152 foo2[42745:5048189] (null)
17
  • 14
    Yeah, but this is not a true objective C solution. you just like it cause you're a c++ guy. Jun 25, 2014 at 13:10
  • 10
    Aran, I am a guy who seeks to use the best available tools for the job. objective-c does not have good data handling capabilities, being essentially C with some messaging hacks and a massive supporting library. It's an anachronistic and obsolete language (hence apple seeking to replace it with SWIFT). Since we have the opportunity to use the excellent c++ compiler that ships with xcode, why not take it? Jun 26, 2014 at 10:02
  • 2
    This is not Objective-c as much as Objective-C is not C. It's supported natively by the compiler and has better memory management capabilities Jul 5, 2015 at 2:06
  • 2
    I wrap all objective-c objects in lightweight c++ wrappers. It makes for safe code and completely obviates Apple's latest idiocy - Swift. Oct 2, 2015 at 7:55
  • 1
    I feel like that only proves probable safety — assuming the same eventually underlying realities as realloc, resizing does not necessarily imply movement. I guess we'd need also to check that .data() or &myThings[0] changes after insertion of the first thing and before insertion of the last? I apologise for being so unconstructive — I'm typing this from work and making slender justifications of use of time. I'm the one who thinks there might be a problem, please don't waste more of your time if you're certain not. I can prove myself wrong at my leisure (and promise to attempt to do so).
    – Tommy
    Sep 21, 2016 at 17:31
13

If you do not require a specific order you could use NSMapTable with special key/value options

NSPointerFunctionsWeakMemory

Uses weak read and write barriers appropriate for ARC or GC. Using NSPointerFunctionsWeakMemory object references will turn to NULL on last release.

1
  • This is the correct answer, if you can tolerate set-like (instead of array-like) behavior
    – bcattle
    Jun 13, 2016 at 3:25
11

I believe the best solution for this is to use NSHashTable or NSMapTable. the Key or/and the Value can be weak. You can read more about it here: http://nshipster.com/nshashtable-and-nsmaptable/

4

To add weak self reference to NSMutableArray, create a custom class with a weak property as given below.

NSMutableArray *array = [NSMutableArray new];

Step 1: create a custom class 

@interface DelegateRef : NSObject

@property(nonatomic, weak)id delegateWeakReference;

@end

Step 2: create a method to add self as weak reference to NSMutableArray. But here we add the DelegateRef object

-(void)addWeakRef:(id)ref
{

  DelegateRef *delRef = [DelegateRef new];

  [delRef setDelegateWeakReference:ref] 

  [array addObject:delRef];

}

Step 3: later on, if the property delegateWeakReference == nil, the object can be removed from the array

The property will be nil, and the references will be deallocated at proper time independent of this array references

3
  • Hi MistyD, please let me know why did you edit this post ? I didn't see any change made. Please don't edit my post Mar 31, 2015 at 6:04
  • You can click on the "edited" line to see what was changed. Looking at the edit, I see that Misty added formatting to your code blocks so that they show up as code, none of your content was changed. This is a perfectly valid edit for someone to make and you shouldn't expect others to not edit your posts. Aug 1, 2015 at 21:46
  • @HarishKumarKailas They were formatting your code into a code block, you had posted it as plain-text which is discouraged. Jun 1, 2020 at 7:14
4

The simplest solution:

NSMutableArray *array = (__bridge_transfer NSMutableArray *)CFArrayCreateMutable(nil, 0, nil);
NSMutableDictionary *dictionary = (__bridge_transfer NSMutableDictionary *)CFDictionaryCreateMutable(nil, 0, nil, nil);
NSMutableSet *set = (__bridge_transfer NSMutableSet *)CFSetCreateMutable(nil, 0, nil);

Note: And this works on iOS 4.x too.

3
  • 2
    Not clear on what makes any of these hold weak objects. Dec 11, 2014 at 20:22
  • Nil allocator. Look at declaration of this methods CFMutableArrayRef CFArrayCreateMutable ( CFAllocatorRef allocator, CFIndex capacity, const CFArrayCallBacks *callBacks ); You can read more in documentation.
    – ArtFeel
    Dec 19, 2014 at 13:31
  • 2
    The question asks for __unsafe_unretained and this correctly supplies __unsafe_unretained; it'd be nice if you didn't follow the original author's misuse of the term weak though.
    – Tommy
    Apr 24, 2015 at 15:13
3

No, that's not correct. Those aren't actually weak references. You can't really store weak references in an array right now. You need to have a mutable array and remove the references when you're done with them or remove the whole array when you're done with it, or roll your own data structure that supports it.

Hopefully this is something that they'll address in the near future (a weak version of NSArray).

7
  • What if I wrap an __unsafe_unretained pointer to Foo inside another object that can be retained by the NSArray? Feb 17, 2012 at 22:30
  • @EmileCormier You could do that, but you should make it a weak property, not __unsafe_unretained. That will prevent a retain cycle but you could very easily end up accessing garbage.
    – Jason Coco
    Feb 17, 2012 at 22:32
  • I wish I could use a weak property, but I can't ignore the iOS 4.x market for my app. My background is C/C++, so I'm used to playing with fire in bad old days before shared_ptr. :-) Feb 17, 2012 at 22:36
  • Depending on when your app is coming out, you may actually want to ignore iOS 4! :) If it follows the same trend as iOS 4, 6 months after launch iOS 5 should be in use in around 90% of the devices, and that mark is in April, so the extra work to support iOS 4 may not pay for the time spent coding/debugging for it. Feb 17, 2012 at 23:01
  • 2
    Just had an idea... Instead of using __unsafe_unretained, I can use a macro that expands to either __unsafe_unretained or __weak, depending on base SDK version. That way, I can detect dangling pointer problems during development on my iOS 5 device. Feb 17, 2012 at 23:55
2

I've just faced with same problem and found that my before-ARC solution works after converting with ARC as designed.

// function allocates mutable set which doesn't retain references.
NSMutableSet* AllocNotRetainedMutableSet() {
    CFMutableSetRef setRef = NULL;
    CFSetCallBacks notRetainedCallbacks = kCFTypeSetCallBacks;
    notRetainedCallbacks.retain = NULL;
    notRetainedCallbacks.release = NULL;
    setRef = CFSetCreateMutable(kCFAllocatorDefault,
    0,
    &notRetainedCallbacks);
    return (__bridge NSMutableSet *)setRef;
}

// test object for debug deallocation
@interface TestObj : NSObject
@end
@implementation TestObj
- (id)init {
   self = [super init];
   NSLog(@"%@ constructed", self);
   return self;
}
- (void)dealloc {
   NSLog(@"%@ deallocated", self);
}
@end


@interface MainViewController () {
   NSMutableSet *weakedSet;
   NSMutableSet *usualSet;
}
@end

@implementation MainViewController

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil {
    self = [super initWithNibName:nibNameOrNil bundle:nibBundleOrNil];
    if (self) {
        // Custom initialization
      weakedSet = AllocNotRetainedMutableSet();
      usualSet = [NSMutableSet new];
   }
    return self;
}

- (IBAction)addObject:(id)sender {
   TestObj *obj = [TestObj new];
   [weakedSet addObject:obj]; // store unsafe unretained ref
   [usualSet addObject:obj]; // store strong ref
   NSLog(@"%@ addet to set", obj);
   obj = nil;
   if ([usualSet count] == 3) {
      [usualSet removeAllObjects];  // deallocate all objects and get old fashioned crash, as it was required.
      [weakedSet enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(TestObj *invalidObj, BOOL *stop) {
         NSLog(@"%@ must crash here", invalidObj);
      }];
   }
}
@end

Output:

2013-06-30 00:59:10.266 not_retained_collection_test[28997:907] constructed 2013-06-30 00:59:10.267 not_retained_collection_test[28997:907] addet to set 2013-06-30 00:59:10.581 not_retained_collection_test[28997:907] constructed 2013-06-30 00:59:10.582 not_retained_collection_test[28997:907] addet to set 2013-06-30 00:59:10.881 not_retained_collection_test[28997:907] constructed 2013-06-30 00:59:10.882 not_retained_collection_test[28997:907] addet to set 2013-06-30 00:59:10.883 not_retained_collection_test[28997:907] deallocated 2013-06-30 00:59:10.883 not_retained_collection_test[28997:907] deallocated 2013-06-30 00:59:10.884 not_retained_collection_test[28997:907] deallocated 2013-06-30 00:59:10.885 not_retained_collection_test[28997:907] * -[TestObj respondsToSelector:]: message sent to deallocated instance 0x1f03c8c0

Checked with iOS versions 4.3, 5.1, 6.2. Hope it will be useful to somebody.

1

If you need zeroing weak references, see this answer for code you can use for a wrapper class.

Other answers to that question suggest a block-based wrapper, and ways to automatically remove zeroed elements from the collection.

1

If you use a lot this comportment it's indicated to your own NSMutableArray class (subclass of NSMutableArray) which doesn't increase the retain count.

You should have something like this:

-(void)addObject:(NSObject *)object {
    [self.collection addObject:[NSValue valueWithNonretainedObject:object]];
}

-(NSObject*) getObject:(NSUInteger)index {

    NSValue *value = [self.collection objectAtIndex:index];
    if (value.nonretainedObjectValue != nil) {
        return value.nonretainedObjectValue;
    }

    //it's nice to clean the array if the referenced object was deallocated
    [self.collection removeObjectAtIndex:index];

    return nil;
}
-2

I think an elegant solution is what Mr. Erik Ralston propose on his Github repository

https://gist.github.com/eralston/8010285

this are the essential steps:

create a category for NSArray and NSMutableArray

in the implementation create a convenience class with a weak property. Your category will assign the objects to this weak property.

.h

 #import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface NSArray(WeakArray)

- (__weak id)weakObjectForIndex:(NSUInteger)index;
-(id<NSFastEnumeration>)weakObjectsEnumerator;

@end

@interface NSMutableArray (FRSWeakArray)

-(void)addWeakObject:(id)object;
-(void)removeWeakObject:(id)object;

-(void)cleanWeakObjects;

@end

.m

#import "NSArray+WeakArray.h"

@interface WAArrayWeakPointer : NSObject
@property (nonatomic, weak) NSObject *object;
@end

@implementation WAArrayWeakPointer
@end

@implementation NSArray (WeakArray)


-(__weak id)weakObjectForIndex:(NSUInteger)index
{
    WAArrayWeakPointer *ptr = [self objectAtIndex:index];
    return ptr.object;
}

-(WAArrayWeakPointer *)weakPointerForObject:(id)object
{
    for (WAArrayWeakPointer *ptr in self) {
        if(ptr) {
            if(ptr.object == object) {
                return ptr;
            }
        }
    }

    return nil;
}

-(id<NSFastEnumeration>)weakObjectsEnumerator
{
    NSMutableArray *enumerator = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    for (WAArrayWeakPointer *ptr in self) {
        if(ptr && ptr.object) {
            [enumerator addObject:ptr.object];
        }
    }
    return enumerator;
}

@end

@implementation NSMutableArray (FRSWeakArray)

-(void)addWeakObject:(id)object
{
    if(!object)
        return;

    WAArrayWeakPointer *ptr = [[WAArrayWeakPointer alloc] init];
    ptr.object = object;
    [self addObject:ptr];

    [self cleanWeakObjects];
}

-(void)removeWeakObject:(id)object
{
    if(!object)
        return;

    WAArrayWeakPointer *ptr = [self weakPointerForObject:object];

    if(ptr) {

        [self removeObject:ptr];

        [self cleanWeakObjects];
    }
}

-(void)cleanWeakObjects
{

    NSMutableArray *toBeRemoved = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    for (WAArrayWeakPointer *ptr in self) {
        if(ptr && !ptr.object) {
            [toBeRemoved addObject:ptr];
        }
    }

    for(WAArrayWeakPointer *ptr in toBeRemoved) {
        [self removeObject:ptr];
    }
}

@end
3
  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review
    – Nigel Ren
    Nov 4, 2017 at 19:49
  • added code to the answer, now can you explain what's wrong with the solution in order to be down voted? Nov 5, 2017 at 6:57
  • It may have been downvoted due to lack of the code, but unfortunately whoever downvoted you didn't bother to say anything (which I find annoying as well).
    – Nigel Ren
    Nov 5, 2017 at 7:42

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