3

I have a perl hash that I am indexing like this:

my %hash;
$hash{'number'}{'even'} = [24, 44, 38, 36];
$hash{'number'}{'odd'} = [23, 43, 37, 35];

When I try to print key names like this:

foreach my $key (keys %hash{'number'})
{
   print "Key: $key\n";
}

I get the following error:

Type of arg 1 to keys must be hash (not hash slice) at test.pl

However when I pass the array ref to a function and print it there, it prints the values:

test(\%hash);

sub test
{
   my ($hash) = @_;
   foreach my $key (keys %{$hash->{'number'}})
   {
       print "Key: $key\n";     #outputs: even odd
   }
}

Can someone please let me know what is going wrong here? Also if I have multi-keyed hash which I have in this case where hash is indexed by both 'number' and 'even' or 'odd' if I do something like this:

foreach my $key (keys %hash)
{
print "First Key: $key\n";  #Outputs number
}

Then will I always get 'number' as the output right and I can never get 'even', 'odd' as outputs, correct? This is just to know good coding practice :)

This is the full code:

sub test
{
    my ($hash) = @_;
    foreach my $key (keys %{$hash->{'number'}})
    {
        print "Key: $key\n";
    }

}

my %hash;
$hash{'number'}{'even'} = [24, 44, 38, 36];
$hash{'number'}{'odd'} = [23, 43, 37, 35];

test(\%hash);

foreach my $key (keys %hash)
{
    print "First Key: $key\n";
}

foreach my $key (keys %hash{'number'})
{
  print "Key: $key\n";
}

Thanks, Newbie

6
my %hash;
$hash{'number'}{'even'} = [24, 44, 38, 36];
$hash{'number'}{'odd'} = [23, 43, 37, 35];

%hash is a hash whose keys are strings ('number'), and whose values are hash references.

foreach my $key (keys %hash{'number'})
{
   print "Key: $key\n";
}

To refer to a value that's part of %hash, you want to write $hash{'number'}, not %hash{'number'}.

But $hash{'number'} is a hash reference, not a hash. To refer to the hash that it refers to, you can write this:

%{$hash{'number'}}

Putting it all together this:

my %hash;
$hash{'number'}{'even'} = [24, 44, 38, 36];
$hash{'number'}{'odd'} = [23, 43, 37, 35];

foreach my $key (keys %{$hash{'number'}}) {
   print "Key: $key\n";
}

will produce this output:

Key: even
Key: odd

(possibly not in that order).

  • 1
    And, for academic interest, here is more information on hash slices, which what the original code was accidentally doing: perldoc.perl.org/perldata.html#Slices – user240438 Feb 18 '12 at 1:39
  • OMG...it was like that! I was thinking that the whole name was a key! Thanks for the detailed explanation. It really helped :) – Richeek Feb 18 '12 at 1:39
  • 2
    And if you are using 5.14 or later, keys, values, each, push, pop, slice, shift and unshift can now function on references. That means keys %{ $hash{k} } can be rewritten as keys $hash{k}. Rejoice! – kbenson Feb 18 '12 at 2:03
  • @kbenson: And I'll be glad to use that as soon as I'm guaranteed that my code doesn't need to run on anything older than 5.14. sigh – Keith Thompson Feb 18 '12 at 2:04
0

You can do something like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use warnings;

my %hash;
$hash{'number'}{'even'} = [24, 44, 38, 36];
$hash{'number'}{'odd'} = [23, 43, 37, 35];

foreach my $i(keys %hash){
    print $i;
    foreach my $j(keys %{$hash{$i}}){
        print "\t".$j."\t";
        print join(" ",@{$hash{'number'}{$j}})."\n";
    }
}
  • yes it worked! Thank you very much. But what is the motivation of putting extra curly braces? I mean keys %{$hash{'number'}} worked but keys %hash{'number'}` did not, why is that? – Richeek Feb 18 '12 at 1:36
  • Note the difference in your own examples - in the second one where you pass to the subroutine this is exactly what you are doing. In the first one you are not. Without the extra braces it's not actually a hash. – si28719e Feb 18 '12 at 1:39

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