12

What is the better design practice?

If I have object A and it contains some related objects for example I have a car object and it's various types.

Should I on request api.example.org/cars/1 respond just with ID's to those resources (so if someone need details about them another API call is required at api.example.org/type/1)

{
    "id": 1,
    "name": "Some Car",
    "types": [
        1,
        2
    ]
}

or provide details about those resources as well

{
    "id": 1,
    "name": "Some Car",
    "types": [
        {
            "id": 1,
            "name": "Some Type",
            "something": "Blah"
        },
        {
            "id": 2,
            "name": "Some Type",
            "something": "Blah"
        }
    ]
}

Or provide optional parameter like "displayAll" and then array with names of parameters which should be retrieved all in one API call (in this case types).

11

This touches one of the core principles of REST called HATEOAS (Hypermedia As The Engine Of Application State).

Object IDs are useless and meaningless to clients. What do you do with them? Feed them to a search function? Construct a new URI with them appended to the end of it? Phone a 1-800 number and ask what to do with them? Print them out on paper and mail them to a government agency that helps API clients find their next steps?

Just return the full URI, all the time. The ID given to the client should always be the URI - it's something which uniquely identifies the resource in question and can be used to retrieve, update or remove it.

  • 2
    question though: if you dont separate the root url and the id, if the root url changes (v1 to v2, or whatnot) then all the previous links will be broken, no? is there no use case for wanting to centralize the root to direct the client to? – Alex Moore-Niemi Dec 12 '14 at 2:55
  • 2
    Maintain a very small number of stable "Cool" URIs that should never change, and make every other URI underneath them reachable through hyperlinked navigation. Client apps should be coded to start at the Cool entry point URI and find the resources they need through navigation of those relationships. That's a core part of HATEOAS - the majority of your URI structure should be flexible and changeable as your needs change, but without affecting existing apps. – Brian Kelly Dec 12 '14 at 16:10
2

I prefer the parameterless version of option 1, but I would favor something where the location of the type resource is returned, so that the client may choose whether or not to retrieve those resources.

Otherwise, we are not navigating the documents. Rather, we would be relying upon some out-of-band data, such as knowing the path to the type in advance.

{
    "id": 1,
    "name": "Some Car",
    "types": [
        {
            "location": "api.example.org/type/1"
        },
        {
            "location": "api.example.org/type/2"
        }
    ]
}

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