I have a regular HTML page with some images (just regular <img /> HTML tags). I'd like to get their content, base64 encoded preferably, without the need to redownload the image (ie. it's already loaded by the browser, so now I want the content).

I'd love to achieve that with Greasemonkey and Firefox.

up vote 385 down vote accepted

Note: This only works if the image is from the same domain as the page, or has the crossOrigin="anonymous" attribute and the server supports CORS. It's also not going to give you the original file, but a re-encoded version. If you need the result to be identical to the original, see Kaiido's answer.


You will need to create a canvas element with the correct dimensions and copy the image data with the drawImage function. Then you can use the toDataURL function to get a data: url that has the base-64 encoded image. Note that the image must be fully loaded, or you'll just get back an empty (black, transparent) image.

It would be something like this. I've never written a Greasemonkey script, so you might need to adjust the code to run in that environment.

function getBase64Image(img) {
    // Create an empty canvas element
    var canvas = document.createElement("canvas");
    canvas.width = img.width;
    canvas.height = img.height;

    // Copy the image contents to the canvas
    var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
    ctx.drawImage(img, 0, 0);

    // Get the data-URL formatted image
    // Firefox supports PNG and JPEG. You could check img.src to
    // guess the original format, but be aware the using "image/jpg"
    // will re-encode the image.
    var dataURL = canvas.toDataURL("image/png");

    return dataURL.replace(/^data:image\/(png|jpg);base64,/, "");
}

Getting a JPEG-formatted image doesn't work on older versions (around 3.5) of Firefox, so if you want to support that, you'll need to check the compatibility. If the encoding is not supported, it will default to "image/png".

  • 1
    While this seems to be working (except the unescaped / in the return), it does not create the same base64 string as the one I'm getting from PHP when doing base64_encode on the file obtained with file_get_contents function. The images seem very similar/the same, still the Javascripted one is smaller and I'd love them to be exactly the same. One more thing: the input image is a small (594 bytes), 28x30 PNG with transparent background -- if that changes anything. – Detariael Jun 1 '09 at 14:22
  • 7
    Firefox could be using a different compression level which would affect the encoding. Also, I think PNG supports some extra header information like notes, that would be lost, since the canvas only gets the pixel data. If you need it to be exactly the same, you could probably use AJAX to get the file and base64 encode it manually. – Matthew Crumley Jun 1 '09 at 15:13
  • 7
    Yes, you would download the image with XMLHttpRequest. Hopefully, it would use the cached version of the image, but that would depend on the server and browser configuration, and you would have the request overhead to determine if the file has changed. That's why I didn't suggest that in the first place :-) Unfortunately, as far as I know, it's the only way to get the original file. – Matthew Crumley Jun 1 '09 at 16:44
  • 2
    @trusktr The drawImage will do nothing, and you'll end up with a blank canvas and resulting image. – Matthew Crumley Jun 14 '12 at 14:00
  • 1
    @JohnSewell That's only because the OP wanted the content, not a URL. You would need to skip the replace(...) call if you want to use it as an image source. – Matthew Crumley May 9 '16 at 14:36

This Function takes the URL then returns the image BASE64

function getBase64FromImageUrl(url) {
    var img = new Image();

    img.setAttribute('crossOrigin', 'anonymous');

    img.onload = function () {
        var canvas = document.createElement("canvas");
        canvas.width =this.width;
        canvas.height =this.height;

        var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
        ctx.drawImage(this, 0, 0);

        var dataURL = canvas.toDataURL("image/png");

        alert(dataURL.replace(/^data:image\/(png|jpg);base64,/, ""));
    };

    img.src = url;
}

Call it like this : getBase64FromImageUrl("images/slbltxt.png")

  • 8
    is there a way to turn an image from an external link to base 64 ? – dinodsaurus May 29 '13 at 9:10
  • @dinodsaurus you could load it in an image tag, or do an ajax query. – Jared Forsyth Jul 29 '13 at 20:31
  • 6
    Well, it requires them to implement CORS, but then you just do $.ajax(theimageurl) and it should return something reasonable. Otherwise (if they don't have CORS enabled) it won't work; the security model of the internet disallows it. Unless, of course, you're inside of a chrome plugin, in which case everything is allowed - even the above example – Jared Forsyth Nov 16 '13 at 20:16
  • 4
    You must put img.src = after img.onload =, because in some browsers, such as Opera, the event will not happen. – ostapische Dec 26 '13 at 5:31
  • 1
    @Hakkar a memory leak will only occur in old browsers that use still reference count to inform garbage collection. To my comprehension the circular reference does not create leak in a mark and sweep setup. Once the functions' scopes of getBase64FromImageUrl(url) and img.onload = function () are exited img is unreachable and garbage collected. Other than IE 6/7 and this is ok. – humanityANDpeace Jan 31 '16 at 13:35

Coming long after, but none of the answers here are entirely correct.

When drawn on a canvas, the passed image is uncompressed + all pre-multiplied.
When exported, its uncompressed or recompressed with a different algorithm, and un-multiplied.

All browsers and devices will have different rounding errors happening in this process
(see Canvas fingerprinting).

So if one wants a base64 version of an image file, they have to request it again (most of the time it will come from cache) but this time as a Blob.

Then you can use a FileReader to read it either as an ArrayBuffer, or as a dataURL.

function toDataURL(url, callback){
    var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
    xhr.open('get', url);
    xhr.responseType = 'blob';
    xhr.onload = function(){
      var fr = new FileReader();
    
      fr.onload = function(){
        callback(this.result);
      };
    
      fr.readAsDataURL(xhr.response); // async call
    };
    
    xhr.send();
}

toDataURL(myImage.src, function(dataURL){
  result.src = dataURL;

  // now just to show that passing to a canvas doesn't hold the same results
  var canvas = document.createElement('canvas');
  canvas.width = myImage.naturalWidth;
  canvas.height = myImage.naturalHeight;
  canvas.getContext('2d').drawImage(myImage, 0,0);

  console.log(canvas.toDataURL() === dataURL); // false - not same data
  });
<img id="myImage" src="https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/4e90e48s5vtmfbd/aaa.png" crossOrigin="anonymous">
<img id="result">

  • Just gone through like 5+ different questions and your code is the only one that's worked correctly, thanks :) – Peter Mar 26 '17 at 15:06
  • I get this error with the above code. XMLHttpRequest cannot load data:image/jpeg;base64,/9j/4AA ... /2Q==. Invalid response. Origin 'https://example.com' is therefore not allowed access. – STWilson May 2 '17 at 20:53
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    @STWilson, yes, this method is also tied to the same-origin policy, just like the canvas one. In case of cross-origin request, you need to configure the hosting server to allow such cross-origin requests to your script. – Kaiido May 3 '17 at 2:10
  • @Kaiido so if the image is on another server than the script the hosting server has to enable cross origin requests? If you set img.setAttribute('crossOrigin', 'anonymous') does that prevent the error? – 1.21 gigawatts May 14 '17 at 19:46
  • 1
    Upon more research, it looks like image's can use the crossOrigin attribute to request access but it's up to the hosting server to give access through a CORS header, sitepoint.com/an-in-depth-look-at-cors. As for XMLHttpRequest's it looks like the server has to give access the same as for images through a CORS header but no change is required in your code except maybe setting xhr.withCredentials to false (the default). – 1.21 gigawatts May 14 '17 at 21:21

In addition to matthew's answer, I'd like to say that image.width and image.height return the displayed size of the picture (and crop the image when drawing it to the canvas)

Use naturalWidth and naturalHeight instead, which uses the real-size picture.

See http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/edits.html#dom-img-naturalwidth

  • 1
    that helped me... I was thinking why my only a part of my image is being uploaded everytime!! – hashcoder Jan 13 '15 at 16:59
  • How is this an answer? This should be an edit or a comment, if you ask me – Gust van de Wal May 1 '17 at 22:57

A more modern version of kaiido's answer using fetch would be:

function toDataURL(url) {
  return fetch(url)
      .then((response)=> {
        return response.blob();
      })
      .then(blob=> {
        return URL.createObjectURL(blob);
      });
}

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Fetch_API/Using_Fetch

function encodeImageFileAsURL(cb) {
    return function() {
        var file = this.files[0];
        var reader = new FileReader();
        reader.onloadend = function() {
            cb(reader.result);
        }
        reader.readAsDataURL(file);
    }
}

$('#inputFileToLoad').change(encodeImageFileAsURL(function(base64Img) {
    $('.output')
        .find('textarea')
        .val(base64Img)
        .end()
        .find('a')
        .attr('href', base64Img)
        .text(base64Img)
        .end()
        .find('img')
        .attr('src', base64Img);
}));
@import url('//netdna.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.1.0/css/bootstrap.min.css'); body{ padding: 20px; }
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<h2>Input</h2>
<form class="input-group" id="img2b64">
    <input id="inputFileToLoad" type="file" onchange="encodeImageFileAsURL();" />
</form>
<hr>
Here is Working Fiddle Example:- upload & get Image Data

  • gave some possible reasons. Was it one of those reasons? Or something else? It might be useful for future readers to understand what the underlying issue was – core114 Dec 15 '17 at 6:10
  • @core114 I came across this same issue so i have created new fiddle for for this kind of issue if it is wrong then please let me know i will remove this answer. :-) – Parth Raval Dec 15 '17 at 7:34
  • @PathRaval Don't remove your answer ,I mean your answer better with some information :) ex: look at kaiido''s answer – core114 Dec 15 '17 at 8:22
  • 1
    Ok Bro! I got it & I will add some information in some times Thanks for your suggestion I mean it. :-) – Parth Raval Dec 15 '17 at 8:30

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