I want to be able to compare the two following objects for likeness using AutoFixture.SemanticComparison:

public class Object1
{
  public int a;
}

public class Object2
{
  public int a;
  public int b;
}

Now, when I do it this way:

var o1 = new Object1 { a = 1 };
var o2 = new Object2 { a = 1, b = 2};
o1.AsSource().OfLikeness<Object2>().ShouldEqual(o2);

I get the following exception: "The following members did not match: - b."

I found out that I can omit the 'b' member like this:

var o1 = new Object1 { a = 1 };
var o2 = new Object2 { a = 1, b = 2};
o1.AsSource().OfLikeness<Object2>().Without(object2 => object2.b).ShouldEqual(o2);

However, I find that this is quite cumbersome, because whenever I add a new member to class Object2, I have to correct my unit tests (or at least unit test helpers).

Is there a way to say "I want to compare for likeness just for the subset that exists in both objects"?

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It sounds like you'd like to compare two objects based on the intersection of their properties. This is not currently supported by the Likeness class. The reasoning is this:

Right now the destination type (in the above example, that would be Object2) is the decisive template upon which matching is done. This provides quite a strong statement for an assertion: every public property or field of this class must be matched.

However, a statement about matching the intersection of properties would be a very weak statement, because that intersection might be empty. This could result in False Negatives.

Even if you are TDDing and following the Red/Green/Refactor cycle and you've seen a unit test failing with such a hypothetical Likeness intersection, subsequent refactorings might turn such an assertion into a False Negative, as you remove the last property or field the two objects have in common - and you'll never notice.

However, AutoFixture is open source and all, so you're welcome to suggest this feature or send a pull request.

  • 1
    The argument you described is quite strong. It led me into thinking about what is more cumbersome - adding new properties to Without() or tracking the two objects for property names changes to avoid false positives. Thanks for turning my attention to this! – Grzesiek Galezowski Feb 18 '12 at 13:16

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.