32

I am trying to check if a certain java.io.File is open by an external program. On windows I use this simple trick:

try {
    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(file);
    // -> file was closed
} catch(IOException e) {
    // -> file still open
}

I know that unix based systems allow to open files in multiple processes... Is there a similar trick to achieve the same result for unix based systems ?

Any help / hack highly appreciated :-)

3
  • you're absolutely right... but I need this functionality to monitor the file state (which I do with WatchServices in Java 7). but I also need to detect when a particular file is closed again to unlock it, so that other users may edit it again.
    – salocinx
    Feb 18, 2012 at 16:58
  • This is the next thing I will try to do. lsof seems to exist on quite numerous linux distributions. Opening a new process with lsof and reading out the standard output will do the job. I will present my solution tomorrow in this thread. thanks so far!
    – salocinx
    Feb 19, 2012 at 23:13
  • It appears to me that there is no portable solution available, yet.
    – Edward
    Nov 28, 2014 at 16:05

5 Answers 5

12

Here's a sample how to use lsof for unix based systems:

public static boolean isFileClosed(File file) {
    try {
        Process plsof = new ProcessBuilder(new String[]{"lsof", "|", "grep", file.getAbsolutePath()}).start();
        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(plsof.getInputStream()));
        String line;
        while((line=reader.readLine())!=null) {
            if(line.contains(file.getAbsolutePath())) {                            
                reader.close();
                plsof.destroy();
                return false;
            }
        }
    } catch(Exception ex) {
        // TODO: handle exception ...
    }
    reader.close();
    plsof.destroy();
    return true;
}

Hope this helps.

0
4

This one should also work for Windows systems. But attention, does not work for Linux!

     private boolean isFileClosed(File file) {  
            boolean closed;
            Channel channel = null;
            try {
                channel = new RandomAccessFile(file, "rw").getChannel();
                closed = true;
            } catch(Exception ex) {
                closed = false;
            } finally {
                if(channel!=null) {
                    try {
                        channel.close();
                    } catch (IOException ex) {
                        // exception handling
                    }
                }
            }
            return closed;
    }
3

You can run from Java program the lsof Unix utility that tells you which process is using a file, then analyse its output. To run a program from Java code, use, for example, Runtime, Process, ProcessBuilder classes. Note: your Java program won't be portable in this case, contradicting the portability concept, so think twice whether you really need this :)

2
  • thanks a lot for your solution. I know that I am getting into portability issues - but the target platforms are limited to win/unix/mac. hope I will find a "solid" strategy for each OS :-)
    – salocinx
    Feb 18, 2012 at 14:07
  • 6
    The bigger issue is not portability, but that even if you use lsof and analyze its output and see no one is using this file, nothing guarantees you that on the next line in your code something hasn't opened the file you're interested in Apr 1, 2013 at 15:39
2

Thanks for the original suggestion. I have one small upgrade that is somewhat important to that method:

FileOutputStream fos = null;
try {
    // Make sure that the output stream is in Append mode. Otherwise you will
    // truncate your file, which probably isn't what you want to do :-) 
    fos = new FileOutputStream(file, true);
    // -> file was closed
} catch(IOException e) {
    // -> file still open
} finally {
    if(fos != null) {
    try {
        fos.close();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

Cheers, Gumbatron

1
  • Note: Does not work on Linux. You will still be able to open the file even if it is in use.
    – mdewit
    Jun 24, 2015 at 15:32
0

You can try this semaphore type code for a file lock by @ZZ Coder

File file = new File(fileName);
FileChannel channel = new RandomAccessFile(file, "rw").getChannel();

FileLock lock = channel.lock();
try {
    lock = channel.tryLock();
    // Ok. You get the lock
} catch (OverlappingFileLockException e) {
    // File is open by someone else
  } finally {
   lock.release();
}
3
  • my pleasure @NicolasBaumgardt :) Feb 18, 2012 at 13:48
  • 3
    That only works if everybody else uses this code. Not realistic in the least.
    – tchrist
    Feb 18, 2012 at 13:50
  • 3
    it does not work on ubuntu/linux. the filesystem let me acquire the lock even if the file is already open in another process. but it works for windows. anybody any idea how to achieve the same result on linux ???
    – salocinx
    Feb 18, 2012 at 16:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.