4

asm_execve.s:

.section .data
file_to_run:
.ascii       "/bin/sh"

.section .text
.globl main

main:
    pushl %ebp
    movl %esp, %ebp
    subl $0x8, %esp         # array of two pointers. array[0] = file_to_run  array[1] = 0

    movl file_to_run, %edi
    movl %edi, -0x4(%ebp)   
    movl $0, -0x8(%ebp)

    movl $11, %eax                      # sys_execve
    movl file_to_run, %ebx              # file to execute       
    leal -4(%ebp), %ecx                 # command line parameters
    movl $0, %edx                       # environment block
    int  $0x80              

    leave
    ret

makefile:

NAME = asm_execve
$(NAME) : $(NAME).s
    gcc -o $(NAME) $(NAME).s

Program is executed, but sys_execve is not called:

alex@alex32:~/project$ make
gcc -o asm_execve asm_execve.s
alex@alex32:~/project$ ./asm_execve 
alex@alex32:~/project$ 

Expected output is:

alex@alex32:~/project$ ./asm_execve 
$ exit
alex@alex32:~/project$

This Assembly program is supposed to work like the following C code:

char *data[2];
data[0] = "/bin/sh"; 
data[1] = NULL;
execve(data[0], data, NULL);

Something wrong in system call parameters?

  • Use strace -e execve to trace the execve call your program actually makes. – Peter Cordes Oct 3 '17 at 22:24
10

The execve system call is being called, but you are indeed passing it bad parameters.

(You can see this by running your executable using strace.)

There are three problems:

  1. .ascii does not 0-terminate the string. (You might get lucky, as there is nothing following it in your .data section in this example, but that's not guaranteed...) Add a 0, or use .asciz (or .string) instead.

  2. movl file_to_run, %edi moves the value pointed to by the file_to_run symbol into %edi, i.e. the first 4 bytes of the string (0x6e69622f). The address of the string is just the value of the symbol itself, so you need to use the $ prefix for literal values: movl $file_to_run, %edi. Similarly, you need to say movl $file_to_run, %ebx a few lines further down. (This is a common source of confusion between AT&T syntax and Intel syntax!)

  3. The parameters are placed on the stack in the wrong order: -0x8(%ebp) is a lower address than -0x4(%ebp). So the address of the command string should be written to -0x8(%ebp), the 0 should be written to -0x4(%ebp), and the leal instruction should be leal -8(%ebp), %ecx.


Fixed code:

.section .data
file_to_run:
.asciz       "/bin/sh"

.section .text
.globl main

main:
    pushl %ebp
    movl %esp, %ebp
    subl $0x8, %esp         # array of two pointers. array[0] = file_to_run  array[1] = 0

    movl $file_to_run, %edi
    movl %edi, -0x8(%ebp)   
    movl $0, -0x4(%ebp)

    movl $11, %eax                      # sys_execve
    movl $file_to_run, %ebx              # file to execute       
    leal -8(%ebp), %ecx                 # command line parameters
    movl $0, %edx                       # environment block
    int  $0x80              

    leave
    ret
  • As a non-portable extension, Linux allows argv or envp to actually be NULL (like you're doing for envp), so xor %ecx,%ecx ; xor %edx,%edx. An easier way to create argv[] on the stack would be mov $file_to_run, %ebx; push $0 (or a zeroed reg); push %ebx; mov %esp, %ecx. – Peter Cordes Oct 3 '17 at 22:23
  • @PeterCordes non-portable? We are at the assembly level, what portability could we have here? – Ruslan May 30 '19 at 16:16
  • @Ruslan: Exactly; there's no downside to taking advantage if you're writing in asm, because there's no reason to expect this non-standard behaviour to change on Linux. The execve(2) man page documenting this is talking about C, where it is non-portable. – Peter Cordes May 30 '19 at 19:41
1

You actually don't need to load anything in the other arguments. If you are doing this in x86 the following simpler code will also work:

.global _main
.section .text

.data
file_to_run:
.asciz "/bin/sh"

.section .text
.globl main

_main:
pushl %ebp
movl %esp, %ebp

movl $11, %eax                      # sys_execve
movl $file_to_run, %ebx              # file to execute       
movl $0, %ecx                       # Null value will work too
movl $0, %edx                       # Null will works too
int  $0x80              

leave
ret

This will essentially open a shell terminal after invoking the system call.

  • You should use xor %ecx,%ecx to zero registers. Are you sure that passing non-zero garbage works? Anything other than 0 (or a valid pointer) should make the system call return -EFAULT. NULL pointers for argv and envp are specially documented as Linux-specific behaviour (man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/execve.2.html), and being equivalent to passing a pointer to a NULL pointer. But that doesn't imply that other bad pointers will "work". That would actually be a bug in the implementation if it went and execed something instead of returning -EFAULT with non-0 bad pointers – Peter Cordes Oct 3 '17 at 22:17
  • Yes you are correct. I am sorry about that. I basically meant that you if you wish to open a terminal, you don't need to give any specific arguments and it will still work if you give in null values. – Shank Oct 3 '17 at 23:53
  • 1
    Are you sure you tested this? You need $file_to_run, otherwise you're just loading the first 4 bytes of the string and passing it as a pointer. Also, you save/restore ebp, but your code clobbers ebx. If you want to return safely instead of crashing when execve returns an error instead of execcing, you should push/pop ebx as well / instead of making a stack frame. (Perhaps the CRT code is ok if you clobber ebx though.) Optional improvements: your string can go in .rodata so you don't need a .data section. You can use .asciiz to get a zero-terminated string. – Peter Cordes Oct 3 '17 at 23:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.