41

I have been using Entity Framework 4.3 on an existing database and I have a couple of scenarios that I am trying to cater for.

Firstly, if I delete my database I would like to EF to recreate if from scratch - I have successfully used a CreateDatabaseIfNotExists database initialiser for this.

Secondly, if I update my model and the database already exists I would like the database to be updated automatically - I have successfully used Entity Framework 4.3 Migrations for this.

So here's my question. Say I add a new table to my model which requires some reference data, what it the best way to ensure that this data gets created both when the database intialiser runs and also when the migration runs. My desire is that the data gets created when I'm creating the db from scratch and also when the database gets updated as the result of a migration running.

In some EF migrations examples I have seen people use the SQL() function in the UP method of the migration to create seed data but if possible I would rather use the context to create the seed data (as you see in most database initialiser examples) as it seems strange to me that you would use pure sql when the whole idea of EF is abstracting that away. I have tried to use the context in the UP method but for some reason it didn't think that a table that was created in the migration existed when I tried to add the seed data directly below the call to create the table.

Any wisdom greatly appreciated.

55

If you want to use entities to seed data you should use Seed method in your migrations configuration. If you generate fresh project Enable-Migrations you will get this configuration class:

internal sealed class Configuration : DbMigrationsConfiguration<YourContext>
{
    public Configuration()
    {
        AutomaticMigrationsEnabled = false;
    }

    protected override void Seed(CFMigrationsWithNoMagic.BlogContext context)
    {
        //  This method will be called after migrating to the latest version.

        //  You can use the DbSet<T>.AddOrUpdate() helper extension method 
        //  to avoid creating duplicate seed data. E.g.
        //
        //    context.People.AddOrUpdate(
        //      p => p.FullName,
        //      new Person { FullName = "Andrew Peters" },
        //      new Person { FullName = "Brice Lambson" },
        //      new Person { FullName = "Rowan Miller" }
        //    );
        //
    }
}

The way how migrations seed data are not very efficient because it is supposed to be used for some very basic seeding. Every update to new version will go through whole set and try to update existing data or insert new data. If you don't use AddOrUpdate extension method you must manually ensure that data are seeded to database only if they are not present yet.

If you want efficient way for seeding because you must seed o lot of data you will get better result with common:

public partial class SomeMigration : DbMigration
{
    public override void Up()
    {
        ...
        Sql("UPDATE ...");
        Sql("INSERT ...");
    }

    public override void Down()
    {
        ...
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 8
    You can actually create a context in the Up method and use AddOrUpdate to insert rows. However, this won't be wrapped in the migration transaction so can cause issues. Also it isn't guaranteed to compile in the future when the model changes. – Betty Feb 29 '12 at 20:54
  • I tried creating a context in the Up method, but it threw an error saying the table didn't exist. I'll try SQL in the "Up" method instead. – Richard Beier May 15 '12 at 23:41
  • 8
    @Ladislav your depth of knowledge on EF continues to amaze me, have you considered authoring a book on the topic and perhaps addressing common misunderstandings you encounter here? – kingdango Jun 19 '12 at 16:24
  • 1
    You have to be careful to set AutomaticMigrationDataLossAllowed = false when using this approach. If you don't do this, you can lose your data in your database. It happened to me when using auto migrations. Best to use the seed method IMO. – aBetterGamer Oct 25 '12 at 20:57
  • 1
    Is there a way to call that code from the production environment? I'm not sure how to do the very initial database seeding on the target server. I need to create a Role ("Administrator") and make sure a couple of users are in it. – Astaar Dec 22 '12 at 8:29
33

I wouldn't recommend using Sql() calls in your Up() method because (IMO) this is really intended for actual migration code for which there is no built-in function, rather than seed code.

I like to think of seed data as something that could change in the future (even if my schema does not), so I simply write "defensive" checks around all of my inserts in the seed function to make sure that the operation did not fire previously.

Consider a scenario where you have a "Types" table that starts out with 3 entries, but then you later add a 4th. You shouldn't need a "migration" to address this.

Using Seed() also gives you a full context to work with, which is a lot nicer than using the plain sql strings in the Sql() method that Ladislav demonstrated.

Also, keep in mind that the benefit of using built-in EF methods for both the migration code and seed code is that your database operations remain platform-neutral. This means your schema changes and queries are be able to run on Oracle, Postgre, etc. If you write actual raw SQL then you are potentially locking yourself in unnecessarily.

You might be less concerned about this since 90% of people using EF will only ever hit SQL Server, but I'm just throwing it out there to give you a different perspective on the solution.

| improve this answer | |
  • 8
    I think the "Up" method is a good place to do "Reference" data - reference data generally implies the application needs that data for some sort of logic. – nootn Feb 22 '13 at 5:08

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