1385

I have a public async Task Foo() method that I want to call from a synchronous method. So far all I have seen from MSDN documentation is calling async methods via async methods, but my whole program is not built with async methods.

Is this even possible?

Here's one example of calling these methods from an asynchronous method:
Walkthrough: Accessing the Web by Using Async and Await (C# and Visual Basic)

Now I'm looking into calling these async methods from synchronous methods.

6
  • 4
    I ran into this as well. Overriding a RoleProvider you cannot change the method signature of the GetRolesForUser method so you can not make the method async and so cannot use await to call out to api asyncronously. My temporary solution was to add synchronous methods to my generic HttpClient class but would like to know if this is possible (and what the implications might be). Commented Aug 5, 2012 at 4:16
  • 4
    Because your async void Foo() method does not return a Task it means a caller cannot know when it completes, it must return Task instead.
    – Dai
    Commented May 7, 2018 at 2:27
  • 1
    Linking a related q/a on how to do this on a UI thread.
    – noseratio
    Commented Nov 29, 2018 at 1:11
  • 3
    I've used this method and seems to do the job: MyMethodAsync.GetAwaiter().GetResult(); Before that, you might want to check the following article that ends up boiling down to deadlocks and threadpool starvation: medium.com/rubrikkgroup/… Commented May 5, 2022 at 17:40
  • @Timothy Lee Russell I don't think GetRolesForUser() should do much. Especially not call time consuming async methods. Commented Oct 4, 2022 at 11:58

16 Answers 16

1096

Asynchronous programming does "grow" through the code base. It has been compared to a zombie virus. The best solution is to allow it to grow, but sometimes that's not possible.

I have written a few types in my Nito.AsyncEx library for dealing with a partially-asynchronous code base. There's no solution that works in every situation, though.

Solution A

If you have a simple asynchronous method that doesn't need to synchronize back to its context, then you can use Task.WaitAndUnwrapException:

var task = MyAsyncMethod();
var result = task.WaitAndUnwrapException();

You do not want to use Task.Wait or Task.Result because they wrap exceptions in AggregateException.

This solution is only appropriate if MyAsyncMethod does not synchronize back to its context. In other words, every await in MyAsyncMethod should end with ConfigureAwait(false). This means it can't update any UI elements or access the ASP.NET request context.

Solution B

If MyAsyncMethod does need to synchronize back to its context, then you may be able to use AsyncContext.RunTask to provide a nested context:

var result = AsyncContext.RunTask(MyAsyncMethod).Result;

*Update 4/14/2014: In more recent versions of the library the API is as follows:

var result = AsyncContext.Run(MyAsyncMethod);

(It's OK to use Task.Result in this example because RunTask will propagate Task exceptions).

The reason you may need AsyncContext.RunTask instead of Task.WaitAndUnwrapException is because of a rather subtle deadlock possibility that happens on WinForms/WPF/SL/ASP.NET:

  1. A synchronous method calls an async method, obtaining a Task.
  2. The synchronous method does a blocking wait on the Task.
  3. The async method uses await without ConfigureAwait.
  4. The Task cannot complete in this situation because it only completes when the async method is finished; the async method cannot complete because it is attempting to schedule its continuation to the SynchronizationContext, and WinForms/WPF/SL/ASP.NET will not allow the continuation to run because the synchronous method is already running in that context.

This is one reason why it's a good idea to use ConfigureAwait(false) within every async method as much as possible.

Solution C

AsyncContext.RunTask won't work in every scenario. For example, if the async method awaits something that requires a UI event to complete, then you'll deadlock even with the nested context. In that case, you could start the async method on the thread pool:

var task = Task.Run(async () => await MyAsyncMethod());
var result = task.WaitAndUnwrapException();

However, this solution requires a MyAsyncMethod that will work in the thread pool context. So it can't update UI elements or access the ASP.NET request context. And in that case, you may as well add ConfigureAwait(false) to its await statements, and use solution A.

Update: 2015 MSDN article 'Async Programming - Brownfield Async Development' by Stephen Cleary.

39
  • 23
    Solution A seems like what I want, but it looks like task.WaitAndUnwrapException() didn't make it into the .Net 4.5 RC; it only has task.Wait(). Any idea how to do this with the new version? Or is this a custom extension method you wrote?
    – deadlydog
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 23:17
  • 6
    WaitAndUnwrapException is my own method from my AsyncEx library. The official .NET libs don't provide much help for mixing sync and async code (and in general, you shouldn't do it!). I'm waiting for .NET 4.5 RTW and a new non-XP laptop before updating AsyncEx to run on 4.5 (I cannot currently develop for 4.5 because I'm stuck on XP for a few more weeks). Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 23:33
  • 19
    AsyncContext now has a Run method that takes a lambda expression, so you should use var result = AsyncContext.Run(() => MyAsyncMethod()); Commented Jun 23, 2013 at 12:42
  • 5
    @Asad: Yes, more than 2 years later the API has changed. You can now simply say var result = AsyncContext.Run(MyAsyncMethod); Commented Apr 14, 2014 at 23:55
  • 11
    @bluejayke: Install the Nito.AsyncEx library. Alternatively, use .GetAwaiter().GetResult() instead of .WaitAndUnwrapException(). Commented Feb 6, 2020 at 14:03
436

Adding a solution that finally solved my problem, hopefully saves somebody's time.

Firstly read a couple articles of Stephen Cleary:

From the "two best practices" in "Don't Block on Async Code", the first one didn't work for me and the second one wasn't applicable (basically if I can use await, I do!).

So here is my workaround: wrap the call inside a Task.Run<>(async () => await FunctionAsync()); and hopefully no deadlock anymore.

Here is my code:

public class LogReader
{
    ILogger _logger;

    public LogReader(ILogger logger)
    {
        _logger = logger;
    }

    public LogEntity GetLog()
    {
        Task<LogEntity> task = Task.Run<LogEntity>(async () => await GetLogAsync());
        return task.Result;
    }

    public async Task<LogEntity> GetLogAsync()
    {
        var result = await _logger.GetAsync();
        // more code here...
        return result as LogEntity;
    }
}
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  • 9
    Two years on, I'm curious to know how this solution is holding up. Any news? Is there subtlety to this approach that is lost on newbies? Commented Aug 18, 2017 at 12:17
  • 54
    This won't deadlock, true, but simply because it's forced to run in a new thread, outside of the synchronization context of the originating thread. However, there's certain environments where this is very ill-advised: particularly web applications. This could effectively halve the available threads for the web server (one thread for the request and one for this). The more you do this, the worse it gets. You could potentially end up deadlocking your entire web server. Commented Oct 11, 2017 at 14:16
  • 64
    @ChrisPratt - You may be right, because Task.Run() is not a best practice in an async code. But, again, what's the answer to the original question? Never call an async method synchronously? We wish, but in a real world, sometimes we have to.
    – Tohid
    Commented Oct 28, 2017 at 6:44
  • 64
    Kinda crazy that .NET 5.0 is out and there's still no bulletproof way to call async methods synchronously. Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 17:52
  • 4
    @JHBonarius In the first case, the task is performed on a background thread and the result is fetched by the originating context, through the Result property. In the second case, the task is performed on the same context and will lead to a deadlock if that context is the UI Thread.
    – AsPas
    Commented Sep 3, 2021 at 8:18
316

Microsoft built an AsyncHelper (internal) class to run Async as Sync. The source looks like:

internal static class AsyncHelper
{
    private static readonly TaskFactory _myTaskFactory = new 
      TaskFactory(CancellationToken.None, 
                  TaskCreationOptions.None, 
                  TaskContinuationOptions.None, 
                  TaskScheduler.Default);

    public static TResult RunSync<TResult>(Func<Task<TResult>> func)
    {
        return AsyncHelper._myTaskFactory
          .StartNew<Task<TResult>>(func)
          .Unwrap<TResult>()
          .GetAwaiter()
          .GetResult();
    }

    public static void RunSync(Func<Task> func)
    {
        AsyncHelper._myTaskFactory
          .StartNew<Task>(func)
          .Unwrap()
          .GetAwaiter()
          .GetResult();
    }
}

The Microsoft.AspNet.Identity base classes only have Async methods and in order to call them as Sync there are classes with extension methods that look like (example usage):

public static TUser FindById<TUser, TKey>(this UserManager<TUser, TKey> manager, TKey userId) where TUser : class, IUser<TKey> where TKey : IEquatable<TKey>
{
    if (manager == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("manager");
    }
    return AsyncHelper.RunSync<TUser>(() => manager.FindByIdAsync(userId));
}

public static bool IsInRole<TUser, TKey>(this UserManager<TUser, TKey> manager, TKey userId, string role) where TUser : class, IUser<TKey> where TKey : IEquatable<TKey>
{
    if (manager == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("manager");
    }
    return AsyncHelper.RunSync<bool>(() => manager.IsInRoleAsync(userId, role));
}

For those concerned about the licensing terms of code, here is a link to very similar code (just adds support for culture on the thread) that has comments to indicate that it is MIT Licensed by Microsoft. https://github.com/aspnet/AspNetIdentity/blob/master/src/Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.Core/AsyncHelper.cs

Wouldn't this be the same as just calling Task.Run(async ()=> await AsyncFunc()).Result? AFAIK, Microsoft is now discouraging from calling TaskFactory.StartNew, since they are both equivalent and one is more readable than the other.

Absolutely not.

The easy answer is that

.Unwrap().GetAwaiter().GetResult() != .Result

First off the

Is Task.Result the same as .GetAwaiter.GetResult()?

Secondly .Unwrap() causes the setup of the Task not to block the wrapped task.

Which should lead anyone to ask

Wouldn't this be the same as just calling Task.Run(async ()=> await AsyncFunc()).GetAwaiter().GetResult()

Which would then be a It Depends.

Regarding usage of Task.Start() , Task.Run() and Task.Factory.StartNew()

Excerpt:

Task.Run uses TaskCreationOptions.DenyChildAttach which means that children's tasks can not be attached to the parent and it uses TaskScheduler.Default which means that the one that runs tasks on Thread Pool will always be used to run tasks.

Task.Factory.StartNew uses TaskScheduler.Current which means scheduler of the current thread, it might be TaskScheduler.Default but not always.

Additional Reading:

Specifying a synchronization context

ASP.NET Core SynchronizationContext

For extra safety, wouldn't it be better to call it like this AsyncHelper.RunSync(async () => await AsyncMethod().ConfigureAwait(false)); This way we're telling the "inner" method "please don't try to sync to upper context and dealock"

Really great point by alex-from-jitbit and as most object architectural questions go it depends.

As an extension method do you want to force that for absolutely every call, or do you let the programmer using the function configure that on their own async calls? I could see a use case for call three scenarios; it most likely is not something you want in WPF, certainly makes sense in most cases, but considering there is no Context in ASP.Net Core if you could guarantee it was say internal for a ASP.Net Core, then it wouldn't matter.

11
  • 4
    My async methods await other async methods. I do NOT decorate any of my await calls with ConfigureAwait(false). I tried using AsyncHelper.RunSync to call an async function from the Application_Start() function in Global.asax and it seems to work. Does this mean that AsyncHelper.RunSync is reliably not prone to the "marshal back to the caller's context" deadlock issue I read about elsewhere in this posting? Commented May 21, 2015 at 23:00
  • 1
    @Bob.at.SBS depends on what you code does. It's not as simple as if I use this code am I safe. This is very minimal and semi-safe way to run async commands synchronously, it can be easily used inappropriately to cause deadlocks. Commented May 22, 2015 at 3:56
  • 1
    Thanks. 2 follow-up questions: 1) Can you give an example of something the async method wants to avoid that would cause a deadlock, and 2) are deadlocks in this context often timing-dependent? If it works in practice, might I still have a timing-dependent deadlock lurking in my code? Commented May 23, 2015 at 4:57
  • 1
    @Bob.at... the code provided by Erik works perfect under Asp. net mvc5 and EF6, but not when I tried any of the other solutions (ConfigureAwait(false).GetAwaiter().GetResult() or .result) which hangs completely my web app
    – LeonardoX
    Commented Sep 17, 2017 at 1:50
  • 1
    This is the only answer that does not cause deadlocks for my usage scenarios.
    – Aidan
    Commented Aug 9, 2020 at 8:46
272

async Main() is now part of C# 7.2 and can be enabled in the projects advanced build settings.

For C# < 7.2, the correct way is:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
   MainAsync().GetAwaiter().GetResult();
}

static async Task MainAsync()
{
   /*await stuff here*/
}

You'll see this used in a lot of Microsoft documentation, for example: Get started with Azure Service Bus topics and subscriptions.

19
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    I have no idea WHY someone voted this down. This worked great for me. Without this fix, I would have had to propagate ASYCH EVERYWHERE. Commented Jun 28, 2015 at 1:14
  • 21
    Why is this better than MainAsync().Wait()?
    – crush
    Commented Oct 28, 2015 at 23:05
  • 14
    I agree. You just need MainAsync().Wait() instead of all this.
    – Hajjat
    Commented Dec 24, 2015 at 3:23
  • 14
    @crush I was describing how this can avoid some deadlocks. In some situations calling .Wait() from a UI or asp.net thread causes a deadlock. async deadlocks
    – David
    Commented Feb 3, 2016 at 20:02
  • 8
    @ClintB: You should absolutely not do this in ASP.NET Core. Web applications are particularly vulnerable to being thread-starved, and each time you do this, you're pulling a thread from the pool that would otherwise be used to serve a request. It's less problematic for desktop/mobile applications because they're traditionally single-user. Commented Oct 11, 2017 at 14:20
77

I'm not 100% sure, but I believe the technique described in this blog should work in many circumstances:

You can thus use task.GetAwaiter().GetResult() if you want to directly invoke this propagation logic.

7
  • 12
    Solution A in Stephen Cleary's answer above uses this method. See WaitAndUnwrapException source.
    – orad
    Commented Mar 29, 2017 at 17:30
  • do you need use GetResult() if the function you are calling is void or task? I mean if you dont want to get any results back
    – Emil
    Commented Jul 4, 2017 at 16:47
  • 1
    Yes, otherwise it will not block until task completion. Alternatively instead of calling GetAwaiter().GetResult() you can call .Wait()
    – NStuke
    Commented Jul 11, 2017 at 0:57
  • 2
    That's the "many circumstances" part. It depends on the overall threading model and what other threads are doing to determine if there's a risk of deadlock or not.
    – NStuke
    Commented Mar 29, 2018 at 4:09
  • GetAwaiter().GetResult() can still cause deadlocks. It only unwraps the exception into a more sensible one.
    – nawfal
    Commented Jun 5, 2020 at 12:56
68
public async Task<string> StartMyTask()
{
    await Foo()
    // code to execute once foo is done
}

static void Main()
{
     var myTask = StartMyTask(); // call your method which will return control once it hits await
     // now you can continue executing code here
     string result = myTask.Result; // wait for the task to complete to continue
     // use result

}

You read the 'await' keyword as "start this long running task, then return control to the calling method". Once the long-running task is done, then it executes the code after it. The code after the await is similar to what used to be CallBack methods. The big difference being the logical flow is not interrupted which makes it much easier to write and read.

7
  • 24
    Wait wraps exceptions and has the possibility of a deadlock. Commented Feb 18, 2012 at 18:17
  • I thought if you called an async method without using await, it would be executed synchronously. At least that works for me (without calling myTask.Wait). Actually, I got an exception when I tried to call myTask.RunSynchronously() because it had already been executed!
    – awe
    Commented Mar 11, 2013 at 10:44
  • Note: You can then get the result of type T by calling myTask.Result() after the Wait()
    – Eric J.
    Commented Oct 19, 2013 at 15:38
  • 3
    Should this answer still work as of today? I just tried it in an MVC Razor project and the app just hangs on accessing .Result. Commented Feb 23, 2015 at 15:24
  • 8
    @TrueBlueAussie That's the synchronization context deadlock. Your async code marshalls back to the synchronization context, but that's being blocked by the Result call at the time, so it never gets there. And Result never ends, because it's waiting for someone who's waiting for the Result to end, basically :D
    – Luaan
    Commented Feb 23, 2015 at 17:37
32

There is, however, a good solution that works in (almost: see comments) every situation: an ad-hoc message pump (SynchronizationContext).

The calling thread will be blocked as expected, while still ensuring that all continuations called from the async function don't deadlock as they'll be marshaled to the ad-hoc SynchronizationContext (message pump) running on the calling thread.

The code of the ad-hoc message pump helper:

using System;
using System.Collections.Concurrent;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace Microsoft.Threading
{
    /// <summary>Provides a pump that supports running asynchronous methods on the current thread.</summary>
    public static class AsyncPump
    {
        /// <summary>Runs the specified asynchronous method.</summary>
        /// <param name="asyncMethod">The asynchronous method to execute.</param>
        public static void Run(Action asyncMethod)
        {
            if (asyncMethod == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("asyncMethod");

            var prevCtx = SynchronizationContext.Current;
            try
            {
                // Establish the new context
                var syncCtx = new SingleThreadSynchronizationContext(true);
                SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(syncCtx);

                // Invoke the function
                syncCtx.OperationStarted();
                asyncMethod();
                syncCtx.OperationCompleted();

                // Pump continuations and propagate any exceptions
                syncCtx.RunOnCurrentThread();
            }
            finally { SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(prevCtx); }
        }

        /// <summary>Runs the specified asynchronous method.</summary>
        /// <param name="asyncMethod">The asynchronous method to execute.</param>
        public static void Run(Func<Task> asyncMethod)
        {
            if (asyncMethod == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("asyncMethod");

            var prevCtx = SynchronizationContext.Current;
            try
            {
                // Establish the new context
                var syncCtx = new SingleThreadSynchronizationContext(false);
                SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(syncCtx);

                // Invoke the function and alert the context to when it completes
                var t = asyncMethod();
                if (t == null) throw new InvalidOperationException("No task provided.");
                t.ContinueWith(delegate { syncCtx.Complete(); }, TaskScheduler.Default);

                // Pump continuations and propagate any exceptions
                syncCtx.RunOnCurrentThread();
                t.GetAwaiter().GetResult();
            }
            finally { SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(prevCtx); }
        }

        /// <summary>Runs the specified asynchronous method.</summary>
        /// <param name="asyncMethod">The asynchronous method to execute.</param>
        public static T Run<T>(Func<Task<T>> asyncMethod)
        {
            if (asyncMethod == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("asyncMethod");

            var prevCtx = SynchronizationContext.Current;
            try
            {
                // Establish the new context
                var syncCtx = new SingleThreadSynchronizationContext(false);
                SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(syncCtx);

                // Invoke the function and alert the context to when it completes
                var t = asyncMethod();
                if (t == null) throw new InvalidOperationException("No task provided.");
                t.ContinueWith(delegate { syncCtx.Complete(); }, TaskScheduler.Default);

                // Pump continuations and propagate any exceptions
                syncCtx.RunOnCurrentThread();
                return t.GetAwaiter().GetResult();
            }
            finally { SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(prevCtx); }
        }

        /// <summary>Provides a SynchronizationContext that's single-threaded.</summary>
        private sealed class SingleThreadSynchronizationContext : SynchronizationContext
        {
            /// <summary>The queue of work items.</summary>
            private readonly BlockingCollection<KeyValuePair<SendOrPostCallback, object>> m_queue =
                new BlockingCollection<KeyValuePair<SendOrPostCallback, object>>();
            /// <summary>The processing thread.</summary>
            private readonly Thread m_thread = Thread.CurrentThread;
            /// <summary>The number of outstanding operations.</summary>
            private int m_operationCount = 0;
            /// <summary>Whether to track operations m_operationCount.</summary>
            private readonly bool m_trackOperations;

            /// <summary>Initializes the context.</summary>
            /// <param name="trackOperations">Whether to track operation count.</param>
            internal SingleThreadSynchronizationContext(bool trackOperations)
            {
                m_trackOperations = trackOperations;
            }

            /// <summary>Dispatches an asynchronous message to the synchronization context.</summary>
            /// <param name="d">The System.Threading.SendOrPostCallback delegate to call.</param>
            /// <param name="state">The object passed to the delegate.</param>
            public override void Post(SendOrPostCallback d, object state)
            {
                if (d == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("d");
                m_queue.Add(new KeyValuePair<SendOrPostCallback, object>(d, state));
            }

            /// <summary>Not supported.</summary>
            public override void Send(SendOrPostCallback d, object state)
            {
                throw new NotSupportedException("Synchronously sending is not supported.");
            }

            /// <summary>Runs an loop to process all queued work items.</summary>
            public void RunOnCurrentThread()
            {
                foreach (var workItem in m_queue.GetConsumingEnumerable())
                    workItem.Key(workItem.Value);
            }

            /// <summary>Notifies the context that no more work will arrive.</summary>
            public void Complete() { m_queue.CompleteAdding(); }

            /// <summary>Invoked when an async operation is started.</summary>
            public override void OperationStarted()
            {
                if (m_trackOperations)
                    Interlocked.Increment(ref m_operationCount);
            }

            /// <summary>Invoked when an async operation is completed.</summary>
            public override void OperationCompleted()
            {
                if (m_trackOperations &&
                    Interlocked.Decrement(ref m_operationCount) == 0)
                    Complete();
            }
        }
    }
}

Usage:

AsyncPump.Run(() => FooAsync(...));

More detailed description of the async pump is available here.

3
24

To anyone paying attention to this question anymore...

If you look in Microsoft.VisualStudio.Services.WebApi there's a class called TaskExtensions. Within that class you'll see the static extension method Task.SyncResult(), which like totally just blocks the thread till the task returns.

Internally it calls task.GetAwaiter().GetResult() which is pretty simple, however it's overloaded to work on any async method that return Task, Task<T> or Task<HttpResponseMessage>... syntactic sugar, baby... daddy's got a sweet tooth.

It looks like ...GetAwaiter().GetResult() is the MS-official way to execute async code in a blocking context. Seems to work very fine for my use case.

2
  • 6
    You had me at "like totally just blocks". Commented Aug 8, 2019 at 0:38
  • 3
    task.GetAwaiter().GetResult() causes deadlocks always for me.
    – Aidan
    Commented Aug 9, 2020 at 8:44
16
var result = Task.Run(async () => await configManager.GetConfigurationAsync()).ConfigureAwait(false);

OpenIdConnectConfiguration config = result.GetAwaiter().GetResult();

Or use this:

var result=result.GetAwaiter().GetResult().AccessToken
16

You can call any asynchronous method from synchronous code, that is, until you need to await on them, in which case they have to be marked as async too.

As a lot of people are suggesting here, you could call Wait() or Result on the resulting task in your synchronous method, but then you end up with a blocking call in that method, which sort of defeats the purpose of async.

If you really can't make your method async and you don't want to lock up the synchronous method, then you're going to have to use a callback method by passing it as parameter to the ContinueWith() method on task.

4
  • 11
    Then that wouldn't be calling the method synchronously now would it? Commented Feb 18, 2012 at 18:05
  • 6
    As I understand, the question was can you call an async method from a non-async method. This does not imply having to call the async method in a blocking manner.
    – base2
    Commented Feb 18, 2012 at 18:23
  • 2
    Sorry, your "they have to be marked async too" drew my attention away from what you were really saying. Commented Feb 18, 2012 at 22:56
  • 2
    If I don't really care about the asynchronousness, is it OK to call it this way (and what about the possibility of deadlocks in wrapped exceptions that Stephen Cleary keeps nagging about?) I have some test methods (that must be executed synchronously) that tests asynchronous methods. I must wait for the result before continuing, so I can test the result of the asynchronous method.
    – awe
    Commented Mar 11, 2013 at 11:20
13

Here is the simplest solution. I saw it somewhere on the Internet, I didn't remember where, but I have been using it successfully. It will not deadlock the calling thread.

    void SynchronousFunction()
    {
        Task.Run(Foo).Wait();
    }

    string SynchronousFunctionReturnsString()
    {
        return Task.Run(Foo).Result;
    }

    string SynchronousFunctionReturnsStringWithParam(int id)
    {
        return Task.Run(() => Foo(id)).Result;
    }
1
  • This will not rethrow the original exception, instead it will fail on something thread related. It is solved in my reply Commented Feb 28, 2023 at 12:34
11

Stephen Cleary's Answer;

That approach shouldn't cause a deadlock (assuming that ProblemMethodAsync doesn't send updates to the UI thread or anything like that). It does assume that ProblemMethodAsync can be called on a thread pool thread, which is not always the case.

https://blog.stephencleary.com/2012/07/dont-block-on-async-code.html

And here is the approach;

The Thread Pool Hack A similar approach to the Blocking Hack is to offload the asynchronous work to the thread pool, then block on the resulting task. The code using this hack would look like the code shown in Figure 7.

Figure 7 Code for the Thread Pool Hack

C#

public sealed class WebDataService : IDataService
{
  public string Get(int id)
  {
    return Task.Run(() => GetAsync(id)).GetAwaiter().GetResult();
  }
  public async Task<string> GetAsync(int id)
  {
    using (var client = new WebClient())
      return await client.DownloadStringTaskAsync(
      "https://www.example.com/api/values/" + id);
  }
}

The call to Task.Run executes the asynchronous method on a thread pool thread. Here it will run without a context, thus avoiding the deadlock. One of the problems with this approach is the asynchronous method can’t depend on executing within a specific context. So, it can’t use UI elements or the ASP.NET HttpContext.Current.

1
  • 1
    Thank you. Worked for me and is probably the most up-to-date way of achieving this.
    – Ian GM
    Commented Mar 21, 2023 at 12:00
9

Inspired by some of the other answers, I created the following simple helper methods:

public static TResult RunSync<TResult>(Func<Task<TResult>> method)
{
    var task = method();
    return task.GetAwaiter().GetResult();
}

public static void RunSync(Func<Task> method)
{
    var task = method();
    task.GetAwaiter().GetResult();
}

They can be called as follows (depending on whether you are returning a value or not):

RunSync(() => Foo());
var result = RunSync(() => FooWithResult());
3
  • I had to change the method to be like this for it to work: return Task.Run(async () => await method()).GetAwaiter().GetResult();
    – herdsothom
    Commented Sep 14, 2021 at 0:37
  • @herdsothom that's because in your case method() is actually an asyncrounous method itself - while in @Metalogic's example foo() is a syncrounous method that he is calling asyncrounously. In your case simply method().GetAwaiter().GetResult(); should sufice
    – 537mfb
    Commented Sep 24, 2021 at 9:26
  • 1
    @Theodor Zoulias, I've updated my answer as suggested.
    – Metalogic
    Commented Oct 23, 2023 at 19:54
5

Well I was using this approach for years, which also handles and propagates exceptions from the underlying async task. Which works flawlessly.

private string RunSync()
{
    var task = Task.Run(async () => await GenerateCodeService.GenerateCodeAsync());
    if (task.IsFaulted && task.Exception != null)
    {
        throw task.Exception;
    }

    return task.Result;
}

But since that Microsoft created this async helper: https://github.com/aspnet/AspNetIdentity/blob/main/src/Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.Core/AsyncHelper.cs

Here is also their source:

public static void RunSync(Func<Task> func)
        {
            var cultureUi = CultureInfo.CurrentUICulture;
            var culture = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture;
            _myTaskFactory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = culture;
                Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = cultureUi;
                return func();
            }).Unwrap().GetAwaiter().GetResult();
        }
7
  • 1
    Works with return task.GetAwaiter().GetResult();
    – Per G
    Commented Mar 25, 2020 at 16:42
  • .Result i think is the same basically as .GetAwaiter().GetResult()
    – Per G
    Commented Apr 2, 2020 at 14:33
  • 2
    This causes deadlocks for me, sorry. The AsyncHelper answer seems to be the only one that does not.
    – Aidan
    Commented Aug 9, 2020 at 8:44
  • 1
    @Aidan source code sample for that deadlock ?
    – Kiquenet
    Commented Dec 8, 2022 at 20:41
  • 1
    This is the only thing here that worked for me. GetAwaiter().GetResult() kept deadlocking on me.
    – NielW
    Commented Jun 14 at 16:45
0

You can now use source generators to create a sync version of your method using Sync Method Generator library (nuget).

Use it as follows:

[Zomp.SyncMethodGenerator.CreateSyncVersion]
public async Task FooAsync()

Which will generate Foo method which you can call synchronously.

2
  • 1
    Interesting approach but I think this should only be used if you are calling another method you have written. The reason is this line(Remove asynchronous invocations without the Async suffix) from the main GitHub page because you're not the author this feature can definitely introduce bugs. Since there are APIs out there that only support Async API this unfortunately is not a universal solution to OP's question.
    – patvax
    Commented Jan 12 at 23:09
  • 1
    When a library has async API only, this indeed won't work and that invocation will get dropped. The way to currently handle it is with #if SYNC_ONLY special macro. Commented Jan 13 at 13:11
-3

Everyone seems to presuppose that there is a need to wait for the result. I often have to update data from synchronous methods where I don't care about the result. I just use a discard:

_ = UpdateAsync();
3
  • this is wrong sorry, it means, it's not guaranteed, that the code inside will run to an end. if the main() will reach an end of execution, it will not look after the code inside if it's done or not, and will just shut it down. Commented Jul 27, 2023 at 9:54
  • @JiříHerník I have a project where data lists (tables that the usere sees and uses to pick existing records) in the client are loaded async. Why should it matter if the code finishes before the user closes the application? Maybe "wait for the result" isn't the best possible expression... Commented Aug 15, 2023 at 13:34
  • 1
    The code inside not awaited async task is not quarantined to finish. That is all. Commented Aug 26, 2023 at 9:43

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