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I am wondering what the semantics of using the abstract keyword in combination with a trait is.

If the trait does not define any abstract methods, the abstract keyword does not prevent me from creating an instance:

scala> abstract trait T
defined trait T

scala> new T{}
res0: java.lang.Object with T = $anon$1@12cd927d

On the other hand, if the trait does define an abstract method, I cannot create an instance (without implementing this method of course) no matter if the abstract keyword is present or not:

scala> abstract trait T { def foo : Unit }
defined trait T

scala> new T{}
<console>:9: error: object creation impossible, since method foo in trait T of type =>    Unit is not defined
              new T{}
                  ^

scala> trait T { def foo : Unit }
defined trait T

scala> new T{}
<console>:9: error: object creation impossible, since method foo in trait T of type =>     Unit is not defined
              new T{}
                  ^

So what is the abstract keyword in front of a trait good for?

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  • 2
    You can't create an instance of a trait. When you say new T{} you create an anonymous object which mixins the trait T.
    – kiritsuku
    Feb 19, 2012 at 13:27

2 Answers 2

31

It has no effect, traits are automatically abstract.

The abstract modifier is used in class definitions. It is redundant for traits, and mandatory for all other classes which have incomplete members.

http://www.scala-lang.org/docu/files/ScalaReference.pdf

2

You're not creating an instance of the trait. Traits can't be instantiated.

You're creating an instance of an anonymous class extending the trait.

In general,

new __t__

is equivalent to

{ class __anonymous__ extends __t__; new __anonymous__ }

(where __anonymous__ is a fresh name of an anonymous class that is inaccessible to the user program).

This is detailed in section 6.10 Instance Creation Expressions of the Scala Language Specification.

So, the reason why you can create an instance in the first case, is because you're not creating an instance of the trait (which is abstract) but an object (which isn't).

In the second case, the reason why you can't create an instance is that if you inherit from something, whether that is a trait or a class, you ultimately have to implement its abstract methods somewhere along the inheritance chain in order to instantiate it. In the first case, there are no abstract methods to implement.

The abstract keyword itself makes no difference: traits are implicitly abstract, the keyword is redundant.

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  • 4
    I think you mean that he is creating an anonymous class, which has the trait as a mixin. Feb 19, 2012 at 15:11
  • Sorry, yes. An object that is an instance of an anonymous class that is a subclass of the trait. Phew. Mar 31, 2016 at 14:20

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