277

Assuming connectionDetails is a Python dictionary, what's the best, most elegant, most "pythonic" way of refactoring code like this?

if "host" in connectionDetails:
    host = connectionDetails["host"]
else:
    host = someDefaultValue

8 Answers 8

397

Like this:

host = connectionDetails.get('host', someDefaultValue)
10
  • 56
    Note that the second argument is a value, not a key.
    – Marcin
    Feb 20, 2012 at 9:49
  • 7
    +1 for readability, but if/else is much faster. That might or might not play a role. Jul 6, 2013 at 9:20
  • 11
    @Tim, Can you provide a reference as to why if/else is faster?
    – nishantjr
    Oct 27, 2014 at 5:58
  • 4
    @Tim: I had assumed that one of the advantages of using a higher level language is that the interpreter would be able to 'see' inside the functions and optimize it - that the user wouldn't have to deal with micro-optimizations as much. Isn't that what things like JIT compilation are for?
    – nishantjr
    Oct 27, 2014 at 7:32
  • 4
    @nishantjr: Python (at least CPython, the most common variant) does'nt have JIT compilation. PyPy might indeed solve this faster, but I haven't got that installed since standard Python has always been fast enough for my purposes so far. In general, it's unlikely to matter in real life - if you need to do time-critical number crunching, Python probably is not the language of choice... Oct 27, 2014 at 7:42
128

You can also use the defaultdict like so:

from collections import defaultdict
a = defaultdict(lambda: "default", key="some_value")
a["blabla"] => "default"
a["key"] => "some_value"

You can pass any ordinary function instead of lambda:

from collections import defaultdict
def a():
  return 4

b = defaultdict(a, key="some_value")
b['absent'] => 4
b['key'] => "some_value"
3
  • 11
    I came here for some different problem than the OP's question, and your solution exactly solves it.
    – 0xc0de
    Dec 17, 2015 at 6:27
  • I would +1 it but sadly it doesn't fit in with get or similar methods.
    – 0xc0de
    Dec 17, 2015 at 9:20
  • This answer was useful to me for ensuring additions to a dictionary included default keys. My implementation is a little too long to describe in a StackOverflow answer, so I wrote about it here. persagen.com/2020/03/05/… Mar 6, 2020 at 3:11
32

While .get() is a nice idiom, it's slower than if/else (and slower than try/except if presence of the key in the dictionary can be expected most of the time):

>>> timeit.timeit(setup="d={1:2, 3:4, 5:6, 7:8, 9:0}", 
... stmt="try:\n a=d[1]\nexcept KeyError:\n a=10")
0.07691968797894333
>>> timeit.timeit(setup="d={1:2, 3:4, 5:6, 7:8, 9:0}", 
... stmt="try:\n a=d[2]\nexcept KeyError:\n a=10")
0.4583777282275605
>>> timeit.timeit(setup="d={1:2, 3:4, 5:6, 7:8, 9:0}", 
... stmt="a=d.get(1, 10)")
0.17784020746671558
>>> timeit.timeit(setup="d={1:2, 3:4, 5:6, 7:8, 9:0}", 
... stmt="a=d.get(2, 10)")
0.17952161730158878
>>> timeit.timeit(setup="d={1:2, 3:4, 5:6, 7:8, 9:0}", 
... stmt="if 1 in d:\n a=d[1]\nelse:\n a=10")
0.10071221458065338
>>> timeit.timeit(setup="d={1:2, 3:4, 5:6, 7:8, 9:0}", 
... stmt="if 2 in d:\n a=d[2]\nelse:\n a=10")
0.06966537335119938
10
  • 4
    I still don't see why if/then would be faster. Both cases require a dictionary lookup, and unless the invocation of get() is so much slower, what else accounts for the slowdown?
    – Jens
    Mar 13, 2015 at 21:33
  • 2
    @Jens: Function calls are expensive. Mar 13, 2015 at 21:35
  • 4
    Which shouldn't be a big deal in a heavily populated dictionary, correct? Meaning the function call is not going to matter much if the actual lookup is costly. It probably only matters in toy examples.
    – AturSams
    May 14, 2015 at 10:56
  • 2
    @zehelvion: Dictionary lookup is O(1) regardless of dictionary size, so the function call overhead is relevant. May 14, 2015 at 11:42
  • 46
    it is bizarre if the overhead of calling a function would make you decide against using get. Use what your fellow team members can read best. Apr 4, 2016 at 20:51
21

For multiple different defaults try this:

connectionDetails = { "host": "www.example.com" }
defaults = { "host": "127.0.0.1", "port": 8080 }

completeDetails = {}
completeDetails.update(defaults)
completeDetails.update(connectionDetails)
completeDetails["host"]  # ==> "www.example.com"
completeDetails["port"]  # ==> 8080
1
  • 3
    This is a good idiomatic solution, but there is a pitfall. Unexpected outcomes may result if connectionDetails is supplied with None or the emptyString as one of the values in the key-value pairs. The defaults dictionary could potentially have one of its values unintentionally blanked out. (see also stackoverflow.com/questions/6354436)
    – dreftymac
    May 29, 2017 at 18:05
14

This is not exactly the question asked for but there is a method in python dictionaries: dict.setdefault

    host = connectionDetails.setdefault('host',someDefaultValue)

However this method sets the value of connectionDetails['host'] to someDefaultValue if key host is not already defined, unlike what the question asked.

1
  • 4
    Note that setdefault() returns value, so this works as well: host = connectionDetails.setdefault('host', someDefaultValue). Just beware that it will set connectionDetails['host'] to default value if the key wasn't there before.
    – ash108
    Oct 16, 2016 at 18:41
9

(this is a late answer)

An alternative is to subclass the dict class and implement the __missing__() method, like this:

class ConnectionDetails(dict):
    def __missing__(self, key):
        if key == 'host':
            return "localhost"
        raise KeyError(key)

Examples:

>>> connection_details = ConnectionDetails(port=80)

>>> connection_details['host']
'localhost'

>>> connection_details['port']
80

>>> connection_details['password']
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "python", line 1, in <module>
  File "python", line 6, in __missing__
KeyError: 'password'
5

Testing @Tim Pietzcker's suspicion about the situation in PyPy (5.2.0-alpha0) for Python 3.3.5, I find that indeed both .get() and the if/else way perform similar. Actually it seems that in the if/else case there is even only a single lookup if the condition and the assignment involve the same key (compare with the last case where there is two lookups).

>>>> timeit.timeit(setup="d={1:2, 3:4, 5:6, 7:8, 9:0}",
.... stmt="try:\n a=d[1]\nexcept KeyError:\n a=10")
0.011889292989508249
>>>> timeit.timeit(setup="d={1:2, 3:4, 5:6, 7:8, 9:0}",
.... stmt="try:\n a=d[2]\nexcept KeyError:\n a=10")
0.07310474599944428
>>>> timeit.timeit(setup="d={1:2, 3:4, 5:6, 7:8, 9:0}",
.... stmt="a=d.get(1, 10)")
0.010391917996457778
>>>> timeit.timeit(setup="d={1:2, 3:4, 5:6, 7:8, 9:0}",
.... stmt="a=d.get(2, 10)")
0.009348208011942916
>>>> timeit.timeit(setup="d={1:2, 3:4, 5:6, 7:8, 9:0}",
.... stmt="if 1 in d:\n a=d[1]\nelse:\n a=10")
0.011475925013655797
>>>> timeit.timeit(setup="d={1:2, 3:4, 5:6, 7:8, 9:0}",
.... stmt="if 2 in d:\n a=d[2]\nelse:\n a=10")
0.009605801998986863
>>>> timeit.timeit(setup="d={1:2, 3:4, 5:6, 7:8, 9:0}",
.... stmt="if 2 in d:\n a=d[2]\nelse:\n a=d[1]")
0.017342638995614834
2

You can use a lamba function for this as a one-liner. Make a new object connectionDetails2 which is accessed like a function...

connectionDetails2 = lambda k: connectionDetails[k] if k in connectionDetails.keys() else "DEFAULT"

Now use

connectionDetails2(k)

instead of

connectionDetails[k]

which returns the dictionary value if k is in the keys, otherwise it returns "DEFAULT"

1
  • I upvoted you but the problem with your solution is that dicts work with [] but lambdas work with() May 12, 2019 at 6:32

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