27

We are actively developing a website using .Net and MVC and our testers are having fits trying to get the latest stuff to test. Every time we modify the style sheet or external javascript files, testers need to do a hard refresh (ctrl+F5 in IE) in order to see the latest stuff.

Is it possible for me to force their browsers to get the latest version of these files instead of them relying on their cached versions? We're not doing any kind of special caching from IIS or anything.

Once this goes into production, it will be hard to tell clients that they need to hard refresh in order to see the latest changes.

Thanks!

24

I came up against this too and found what I consider to be a very satisfying solution.

Note that using query parameters .../foo.js?v=1 supposedly means that the file will apparently not be cached by some proxy servers. It's better to modify the path directly.

We need the browser to force a reload when the content changes. So, in the code I wrote, the path includes an MD5 hash of the file being referenced. If the file is republished to the web server but has the same content, then its URL is identical. What's more, it's safe to use an infinite expiry for caching too, as the content of that URL will never change.

This hash is calculated at runtime (and cached in memory for performance), so there's no need to modify your build process. In fact, since adding this code to my site, I haven't had to give it much thought.

You can see it in action at this site: Dive Seven - Online Dive Logging for Scuba Divers

In CSHTML/ASPX files

<head>
  @Html.CssImportContent("~/Content/Styles/site.css");
  @Html.ScriptImportContent("~/Content/Styles/site.js");
</head>
<img src="@Url.ImageContent("~/Content/Images/site.png")" />

This generates markup resembling:

<head>
  <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"
        href="/c/e2b2c827e84b676fa90a8ae88702aa5c" />
  <script src="/c/240858026520292265e0834e5484b703"></script>
</head>
<img src="/c/4342b8790623f4bfeece676b8fe867a9" />

In Global.asax.cs

We need to create a route to serve the content at this path:

routes.MapRoute(
    "ContentHash",
    "c/{hash}",
    new { controller = "Content", action = "Get" },
    new { hash = @"^[0-9a-zA-Z]+$" } // constraint
    );

ContentController

This class is quite long. The crux of it is simple, but it turns out that you need to watch for changes to the file system in order to force recalculation of cached file hashes. I publish my site via FTP and, for example, the bin folder is replaced before the Content folder. Anyone (human or spider) that requests the site during that period will cause the old hash to be updated.

The code looks much more complex than it is due to read/write locking.

public sealed class ContentController : Controller
{
    #region Hash calculation, caching and invalidation on file change

    private static readonly Dictionary<string, string> _hashByContentUrl = new Dictionary<string, string>(StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
    private static readonly Dictionary<string, ContentData> _dataByHash = new Dictionary<string, ContentData>(StringComparer.Ordinal);
    private static readonly ReaderWriterLockSlim _lock = new ReaderWriterLockSlim(LockRecursionPolicy.NoRecursion);
    private static readonly object _watcherLock = new object();
    private static FileSystemWatcher _watcher;

    internal static string ContentHashUrl(string contentUrl, string contentType, HttpContextBase httpContext, UrlHelper urlHelper)
    {
        EnsureWatching(httpContext);

        _lock.EnterUpgradeableReadLock();
        try
        {
            string hash;
            if (!_hashByContentUrl.TryGetValue(contentUrl, out hash))
            {
                var contentPath = httpContext.Server.MapPath(contentUrl);

                // Calculate and combine the hash of both file content and path
                byte[] contentHash;
                byte[] urlHash;
                using (var hashAlgorithm = MD5.Create())
                {
                    using (var fileStream = System.IO.File.Open(contentPath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read))
                        contentHash = hashAlgorithm.ComputeHash(fileStream);
                    urlHash = hashAlgorithm.ComputeHash(Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(contentPath));
                }
                var sb = new StringBuilder(32);
                for (var i = 0; i < contentHash.Length; i++)
                    sb.Append((contentHash[i] ^ urlHash[i]).ToString("x2"));
                hash = sb.ToString();

                _lock.EnterWriteLock();
                try
                {
                    _hashByContentUrl[contentUrl] = hash;
                    _dataByHash[hash] = new ContentData { ContentUrl = contentUrl, ContentType = contentType };
                }
                finally
                {
                    _lock.ExitWriteLock();
                }
            }

            return urlHelper.Action("Get", "Content", new { hash });
        }
        finally
        {
            _lock.ExitUpgradeableReadLock();
        }
    }

    private static void EnsureWatching(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        if (_watcher != null)
            return;

        lock (_watcherLock)
        {
            if (_watcher != null)
                return;

            var contentRoot = httpContext.Server.MapPath("/");
            _watcher = new FileSystemWatcher(contentRoot) { IncludeSubdirectories = true, EnableRaisingEvents = true };
            var handler = (FileSystemEventHandler)delegate(object sender, FileSystemEventArgs e)
            {
                // TODO would be nice to have an inverse function to MapPath.  does it exist?
                var changedContentUrl = "~" + e.FullPath.Substring(contentRoot.Length - 1).Replace("\\", "/");
                _lock.EnterWriteLock();
                try
                {
                    // if there is a stored hash for the file that changed, remove it
                    string oldHash;
                    if (_hashByContentUrl.TryGetValue(changedContentUrl, out oldHash))
                    {
                        _dataByHash.Remove(oldHash);
                        _hashByContentUrl.Remove(changedContentUrl);
                    }
                }
                finally
                {
                    _lock.ExitWriteLock();
                }
            };
            _watcher.Changed += handler;
            _watcher.Deleted += handler;
        }
    }

    private sealed class ContentData
    {
        public string ContentUrl { get; set; }
        public string ContentType { get; set; }
    }

    #endregion

    public ActionResult Get(string hash)
    {
        _lock.EnterReadLock();
        try
        {
            // set a very long expiry time
            Response.Cache.SetExpires(DateTime.Now.AddYears(1));
            Response.Cache.SetCacheability(HttpCacheability.Public);

            // look up the resource that this hash applies to and serve it
            ContentData data;
            if (_dataByHash.TryGetValue(hash, out data))
                return new FilePathResult(data.ContentUrl, data.ContentType);

            // TODO replace this with however you handle 404 errors on your site
            throw new Exception("Resource not found.");
        }
        finally
        {
            _lock.ExitReadLock();
        }
    }
}

Helper Methods

You can remove the attributes if you don't use ReSharper.

public static class ContentHelpers
{
    [Pure]
    public static MvcHtmlString ScriptImportContent(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, [NotNull, PathReference] string contentPath, [CanBeNull, PathReference] string minimisedContentPath = null)
    {
        if (contentPath == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("contentPath");
#if DEBUG
        var path = contentPath;
#else
        var path = minimisedContentPath ?? contentPath;
#endif

        var url = ContentController.ContentHashUrl(contentPath, "text/javascript", htmlHelper.ViewContext.HttpContext, new UrlHelper(htmlHelper.ViewContext.RequestContext));
        return new MvcHtmlString(string.Format(@"<script src=""{0}""></script>", url));
    }

    [Pure]
    public static MvcHtmlString CssImportContent(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, [NotNull, PathReference] string contentPath)
    {
        // TODO optional 'media' param? as enum?
        if (contentPath == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("contentPath");

        var url = ContentController.ContentHashUrl(contentPath, "text/css", htmlHelper.ViewContext.HttpContext, new UrlHelper(htmlHelper.ViewContext.RequestContext));
        return new MvcHtmlString(String.Format(@"<link rel=""stylesheet"" type=""text/css"" href=""{0}"" />", url));
    }

    [Pure]
    public static string ImageContent(this UrlHelper urlHelper, [NotNull, PathReference] string contentPath)
    {
        if (contentPath == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("contentPath");
        string mime;
        if (contentPath.EndsWith(".png", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
            mime = "image/png";
        else if (contentPath.EndsWith(".jpg", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) || contentPath.EndsWith(".jpeg", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
            mime = "image/jpeg";
        else if (contentPath.EndsWith(".gif", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
            mime = "image/gif";
        else
            throw new NotSupportedException("Unexpected image extension.  Please add code to support it: " + contentPath);
        return ContentController.ContentHashUrl(contentPath, mime, urlHelper.RequestContext.HttpContext, urlHelper);
    }
}

Feedback appreciated!

2
  • From a glance at this technique, one theoretical concern I have is hash collisions could result in the client and server having different file content for the same URL. Your hashes are long, which is good, but I'd be more comfortable with the date-based approach since at least it errors on the side of correctness rather than performance.
    – Sam
    Nov 28 '14 at 4:39
  • 2
    In practice hash collisions are not worth worrying about if you use enough characters. With 8 characters, you have a one in 4.2e9 chance of collision. 12 characters gives you 2.8e14. I'll take those odds for a solution that works on content which is ultimately the best strategy. Nov 28 '14 at 7:12
18

You need to modify the names of the external files you refer to. For e.g. add the build number at the end of each file, like style-1423.css and make the numbering a part of your build automation so that the files and the references are deployed with a unique name each time.

3
  • But how to change ASPX sources automatically to use correct names of external files? Jun 2 '09 at 6:53
  • It can easily be done by a post build script. Just write a script or a trivial piece of code that looks for *.css or *.js files and renames them and run it after each build. If you have build automation, you can automatically add this script at the end of each build. Jun 2 '09 at 17:02
  • 1
    @Alexander & @Serhat, see my answer for a way to have names rewritten at runtime without you having to modify your build process, and in a way that maximises the benefit of caching without introducing any caching problems as described by the OP. Jun 22 '11 at 12:33
12

Rather than a build number or random number, append the last-modified date of the file to the URL as querystring programmatically. This will prevent any accidents where you forget to modify the querystring manually, and will allow the browser to cache the file when it has not changed.

Example output could look like this:

<script src="../../Scripts/site.js?v=20090503114351" type="text/javascript"></script>
4
  • 2
    A fine idea, if you can devise a way to avoid the perf impact of querying the file attributes of every referenced file on every request.
    – DSO
    Jun 1 '09 at 21:43
  • Performance impact is pretty much nil, the OS caches that information. If it is a real concern, you can cache the info for 5 seconds or so. Jun 1 '09 at 22:13
  • Alternately you can append the last modified date during your build process, that will completely mitigate any performance impact, and prevent the chance of human error in forgetting to modify the file manually. Jun 6 '09 at 6:13
  • 1
    This will work, but it's not optimal. If you re-upload the same file without changes, for example, it'll cause your users to need to re-download it, even though the contents haven't changed. Also, some proxy servers won't cache URLs that have query strings, so you can lose out on caching benefits. See my answer for a technique that solves these issues. Jun 22 '11 at 12:35
4

Since you mention only your testers complaining, Have you considered having them turn off their local browser cache, so that it checks every time for new content? It will slow their browsers a touch... but unless you are doing usability testing every time, this is probably a whole lot easier than postfixing the filename, adding a querystring param, or modifying the headers.

This works in 90% of the cases in our test environments.

4
  • I second this. Your testers should be using closed environments, so it should be easy to configure an environment to either not use caching or "reset" itself, a la virtual machine. Jun 1 '09 at 21:32
  • 6
    This is not only a problem in a test environment (although that may be the most immediate concern for the OP). When you update a production site, you have to deal with users' browsers that have cached the old version of css/js files.
    – DSO
    Jun 1 '09 at 21:42
  • For now it only affects our testers. My concern is that it will affect live users once we go to production and we make modifications after it's live. Jun 2 '09 at 12:12
  • 1
    This is not a solution to the problem. If your testers are seeing this problem, so will your users. Why would you have testers otherwise? Jun 22 '11 at 12:36
2

What you might do is to call your JS file with a random string each time the page refresh. This way you are sure it's always fresh.

You just need to call it this way "/path/to/your/file.js?<random-number>"

Example: jquery-min-1.2.6.js?234266

3
  • 1
    My only problem with this is that it will never be cached in this scenario. I'd like it to be cached if it hasn't been modified. OrbMan's solution seems to be spot on. Jun 2 '09 at 13:45
  • True. You can also pass via a constant that you change each iteration. Both works very well.
    – Erick
    Jun 2 '09 at 16:57
  • Query strings can cause some problems with proxy server caching (they won't cache it) so you can lose out on benefits. Furthermore, you require all users to re-download stuff each iteration, even if it hasn't changed. See my answer for a solution that works based off the contents of the file itself, so therefore only changes when it needs to and allows for the maximum possible caching benefit. Jun 22 '11 at 12:38
1

In your references to CSS and Javascript files, append a version query string. Bump it everytime you update the file. This will be ignored by the web site, but web browsers will treat it as a new resource and re-load it.

For example:

<link href="../../Themes/Plain/style.css?v=1" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
<script src="../../Scripts/site.js?v=1" type="text/javascript"></script>
1
  • This is a very manual solution. If you're lazy like me, see my answer :) Jun 22 '11 at 12:39
1

you could edit the http headers of the files to force the browsers to revalidate on each request

1
  • True, that would solve the problem, but it will slow down your site. Better solutions exist. Jun 22 '11 at 12:39

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