32

Before someone asks me why the hell I would want to do this let me come straight out and tell you. That way one of you clever peeps out there can tell me a far better way...

I'm making a viewer for paintings which should stretch to fill the page, well 90% of the height of the screen to be precise. I want to fade the paintings in one over the other and want to center each of them in the middle of the screen.

To fade the paintings in over each other I need to position them 'absolute' to stop them from stacking. Here's where the trouble comes. Ever since I've set them to absolute, every method I use to center the containing div hasn't worked.

Part of the problem is that I'm not setting any width for the paintings as I want them to dynamically size themselves to fill 90% of the user's screen.

I've found a hundreds of methods for centering absolute content and believe I might need to shrink wrap the containing div. However I've not had any success as of yet.

HTML-

<div id="viewer_div">
    <img src="" id="first" />
    <img id="second" class="hidden"/>
</div>

Style Sheet

#viewer_div {
        width:1264px;
}


img {
    height:90%;
    display:block;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right:auto;
}

The above gives me the desired effect, but doesn't allow me to position the images absolute. Can anyone suggest a way of centering the images but also allows me to fade one over the other?

5
  • Well this is an ordeal. I'm sure you know how to do it with fixed width and absolute positioning, right?
    – Purag
    Feb 20, 2012 at 20:20
  • After some fiddling, I can guarantee that you cannot do this with pure CSS and (x)HTML. You need Javascript. Which is unfortunate, since this is purely about display and that's what CSS is for... You can fork my fiddle jsfiddle.net/dekket/58BjM if you want. It's as far as I got, so nowhere really :/ Feb 20, 2012 at 20:32
  • Thanks for your input. Greg has shown a cleaner approach below that solves my problem.
    – goose
    Feb 20, 2012 at 20:46
  • Take a look, answered here stackoverflow.com/questions/17069435/… Jan 7, 2015 at 7:35
  • @AntonIskandiarov That is for if you have a percentage-based width e.g. width: 90%;. This is for unknown / automatic width e.g. width: auto;, and unfortunately unless width is set to something (including a percentage) the linked answer treats it as width: 100%. You can of course add a wrapper div with width: 100%; using that trick, then put this content centred inside it the usual way... May 19, 2016 at 19:13

5 Answers 5

66

Pushing the element left by 50% of its width and then translating it horizontally by 50% has worked for me.

.element {
    position: absolute;
    left: 50%;
    transform: translateX(-50%);
} 

I found the concept in the following link, and then I translated to fit my horizontal align needs: https://gist.github.com/colintoh/62c78414443e758c9991#file-douchebag-vertical-align-css

3
50

Either use JavaScript to calculate the width and move it,

use a CSS hack to move the element right and left by 50%,

or don't absolutely position it.


This answer is incredibly short, but it is to the point. If you require something to be centralised (meaning you would like the browser to determine where the centre point is, and position it there), then you can't use absolute positioning - because that takes away control from the browser.


To fade the paintings in over each other I need to position them 'absolute' to stop them from stacking.

This is where your problem lies. You have assumed that you need absolute positioning for the wrong reason.

If you are experiencing problems placing elements on top of each other, wrap the images in an absolutely positioned container which is 100% width and has text-align: center


If you do feel that absolute positioning is necessary, the following hack can be used to achieve your desired results:

div {
    position: absolute;
    /* move the element half way across the screen */
    left: 50%;
    /* allow the width to be calculated dynamically */
    width: auto;
    /* then move the element back again using a transform */
    transform: translateX(-50%);
}

Obviously the above hack has a terrible code smell, but it works on some browsers. Be aware: this hack is not necessarily obvious to other developers, or other browsers (especially IE or mobile).

6
  • 1
    Thank you Greg, this worked a treat. I thought it had to be simpler than I was making it.
    – goose
    Feb 20, 2012 at 20:44
  • I put yes to 'was this post helpful' is that what you mean?
    – goose
    Feb 20, 2012 at 20:49
  • ah got it. Cheers again, you've no idea how much grief it was causing.
    – goose
    Feb 20, 2012 at 21:15
  • 1
    Really good answer, this worked brilliantly. In my code I also gave the child element (the images in the case of this question) "position: relative" and a z-index that was higher than element that it was covering. This allowed the child (rather than its full-width parent) to be in front of the element that it was positioned on.
    – Liran H
    Jul 18, 2015 at 22:32
  • This answer is useful and helpful, but ultimately incorrect. The more recent answers have it right.
    – Sauce
    Oct 11, 2016 at 10:11
7

To go off of Samec's answer, you can also use this to center an absolute position element vertically and horizontally of unknown dimensions:

#viewer_div {
  position: relative;
}
#viewer_div img {
  position: absolute;
  left: 50%;
  top: 0%;
  transform: translate(-50%, 50%);
}
1

Centering div with position: absolute and width: unknown:

HTML:

<div class="center">
  <span></span>

  <div>
    content...
  </div>

</div>

CSS:

.center{
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: auto auto;

  /* if you need the overflow */
  overflow: auto;
}

You can use this solution even if the content is wider than the screen width, and don't need to transform: translate (which can blur elements)


How it works:

Grid will insert a span before the first auto, and insert a div right before the second auto, and you get:

span(0px) - auto - div(...px) - auto

auto will be equal to each other.


Same for vertical centering, but write grid-template-rows instead of a grid-template-columns

1

2021

A modern approach to absolutely centered content with grid and inset

The inset CSS property is a shorthand that corresponds to the top, right, bottom, and/or left. MDN

#viewer_div {
  display: grid;
  place-items: center;
  position: absolute;
  inset: auto 0;
}

*,
::after,
::before {
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;
}

body {
  width: 100vw;
  height: 100vh;
  background-color: hsl(201, 27%, 10%);
  position: relative;
}

#viewer_div {
  display: grid;
  place-items: center;
  position: absolute;
  inset: auto 0;
  background-color: hsl(197, 7%, 21%);
  color: white;
}
<div id="viewer_div">
  <h1>Title 2021</h1>
  <img src="https://via.placeholder.com/180x100.png/09f/fff" id="first" />
</div>

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