39

Is there a simple or standard way to have a multimap iterator which iterate across unique keys in a multimap?

i.e. for a set that looks like: {1, "a"}, {1, "lemon"}, {2, "peacock"}, {3, "angel"} an iterator which would start at {1, "a"} then incrementing would point to {2, "peacock"} and then incrementing again would point to {3, "angel"}?

45

You can use upper_bound to increment the iterator position instead of ++:

#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
  multimap<int,string> mm;
  mm.insert(make_pair(1, "a"));
  mm.insert(make_pair(1, "lemon"));
  mm.insert(make_pair(2, "peacock"));
  mm.insert(make_pair(3, "angel"));

  for( auto it = mm.begin(), end = mm.end();
       it != end;
       it = mm.upper_bound(it->first)
  )
    cout << it->first << ' ' << it->second << endl;
  return 0;
}

This results in:

1 a
2 peacock
3 angel
  • 6
    But what out for the O(n log n) complexity this entailed, instead of the normal O(n) traversal, as mentioned in @user3701170's answer. – ddevienne Mar 25 '15 at 12:53
  • @ddevienne sadly, nowadays everyone chooses elegance over performance. – GreenScape Mar 31 '16 at 7:39
27

Using upper_bound would result in an easy-to-read loop but each call will perform a binary tree search, resulting in an O(n log n) instead of O(n) traversal. If the difference in efficiency matters, you can structure your traversal like this:

typedef std::multimap<std::string, int> MapType;
MapType container;
for (MapType::iterator it = container.begin(); it != container.end(); ) {
  std::string key = it->first;

  doSomething(key);

  // Advance to next non-duplicate entry.
  do {
    ++it;
  } while (it != container.end() && key == it->first);
}
3

As noted in the selected answer, repeated use of multimap::upper_bound leads to an O(n log n) traversal of the map. Using the external upper_bound function gives you O(n). However, you need to ensure you only compare the key of the map:

std::multimap<int, std::string> myMap = ... ;
const auto compareFirst = [](const std::pair<const int, std::string>& lhs, const std::pair<const int, std::string>& rhs) {
    return lhs.first < rhs.first;
};

for(auto it = myMap.begin(); it != myMap.end(); it = std::upper_bound(it, myMap.end(), *it, compareFirst)) {
    // Do stuff...

}

The underlying approach is essentially the same as user3701170's solution - i.e linear search - but we put the increment step in the for statement proper, not the loop's body. Aside from putting the increment where it "usually" lives, this also means any continue statements in the loop will behave as expected.

2

Runnable example

This is a slight improvement over https://stackoverflow.com/a/24212648/895245 with a runnable unit test:

#include <cassert>
#include <map>
#include <vector>

int main() {

    // For testing.
    auto m = std::multimap<int, int>{
        {1, 2},
        {1, 3},
        {2, 4}
    };
    std::vector<int> out;

    // The algorithm.
    auto it = m.begin();
    auto end = m.end();
    while (it != end) {
        auto key = it->first;

        // Do what you want to do with the keys.
        out.push_back(key);

        do {
            if (++it == end)
                break;
        } while (it->first == key);
    }

    // Assert it worked.
    assert(out == std::vector<int>({1, 2}));
}
  • I encourage everybody to avoid the use of goto. And here it is avoided by replacing "goto end;" -> "break;" and "while (true)" -> "while (it != end)" – bebbo May 16 '17 at 20:34
  • @bebbo thanks for the edit, but I think the code wouldn't work because of the lack of update to key. Please make sure you compile and run it ;-) – Ciro Santilli 新疆改造中心法轮功六四事件 May 16 '17 at 20:54
  • It's working. So where is the problem? – bebbo May 17 '17 at 6:36
  • @bebbo I also have to sleep :-) I wish there was a way to not have 2 it == end comparisons, even if that requires goto. – Ciro Santilli 新疆改造中心法轮功六四事件 May 17 '17 at 6:49
  • You need at least a check for an empty map. So there are always 2 comparisons in the code. – bebbo May 17 '17 at 8:16
1

if you have to pass over all unique keys quickly then you can use std::map instead;

typedef std::map< KeyType, std::list< ValueType > > MapKeyToMultiValue;

Insertion would be more difficult, However you can iterate over all keys without having to bother with duplicate entries. Insertion would look as follows:

void insert_m(MapKeyToMultiValue &map, const KeyType key, const ValueType value )
{
  auto it = map.find( key );
  if (it == map.end())
  {
     std::list<ValueType> empty;
     std::pair< MapKeyToMultiValue::iterator, bool > ret =
        map.insert( MapKeyToMultiValue::value_type( key, empty ) );
     it = ret.first;
  }

  it->second.push_back( value );
}

or you can make that very templated:

template<typename KeyType, typename ValueType, 
     typename MapType = std::map< KeyType, std::list< ValueType > > >
void insert_multi( MapType &map, const KeyType key, const ValueType value )
{

  auto it = map.find( key );
  if (it == map.end())
  {
     std::list<ValueType> empty;
     std::pair< typename MapType::iterator, bool > ret =
        map.insert( typename MapType::value_type( key, empty ) );
     it = ret.first;
  }

  it->second.push_back( value );
}

The full test program looks as follows:

#include <map>
#include <list>
#include <string>
#include <stdio.h>

typedef std::string KeyType;  
typedef int ValueType;

typedef std::map< KeyType, std::list< ValueType > >  MapKeyToMultiValue;

void insert_m(MapKeyToMultiValue &map, const KeyType key, const ValueType value )
{
  auto it = map.find( key );
  if (it == map.end())
  {
     std::list<ValueType> empty;
     std::pair< MapKeyToMultiValue::iterator, bool > ret =
        map.insert( MapKeyToMultiValue::value_type( key, empty ) );
     it = ret.first;
  }

  it->second.push_back( value );
}


template<typename KeyType, typename ValueType, 
   typename MapType = std::map< KeyType, std::list< ValueType > > >
void insert_multi( MapType &map, const KeyType key, const ValueType value )
{

  auto it = map.find( key );
  if (it == map.end())
  {
     std::list<ValueType> empty;
     std::pair< typename MapType::iterator, bool > ret =
        map.insert( typename MapType::value_type( key, empty ) );
     it = ret.first;
  }

  it->second.push_back( value );
}


int main()
{
    MapKeyToMultiValue map;


    insert_m(map, std::string("aaa"), 1 );
    insert_m(map, std::string("aaa"), 2 );
    insert_m(map, std::string("bb"), 3 );
    insert_m(map, std::string("cc"), 4 );


    insert_multi(map, std::string("ddd"), 1 );
    insert_multi(map, std::string("ddd"), 2 );
    insert_multi(map, std::string("ee"), 3 );
    insert_multi(map, std::string("ff"), 4 );


    for(auto i = map.begin(); i != map.end(); ++i)
    {
      printf("%s\n", i->first.c_str() );
    }


    return 0;
}
  • 1
    This is way over-complicated. Insert for std::map<int, std::list<int> > map; is just map[1].push_back(2); . If the operator[] lookup doesn't find anything, the list is default constructed, which is very convenient here. – JDiMatteo Apr 5 '16 at 21:57
0

Try equal_range:

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/multimap/equal_range

That must be an exact match.

  • equal_range takes a multimap key in entry... so it's not good if the need is to retrieve keys... – Sandburg Jul 19 at 14:52

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