108

Duplicate of: How to ensure an event is only subscribed to once and Has an event handler already been added?

I have a singleton that provides some service and my classes hook into some events on it, sometimes a class is hooking twice to the event and then gets called twice. I'm looking for a classical way to prevent this from happening. somehow I need to check if I've already hooked to this event...

0
190

How about just removing the event first with -= , if it is not found an exception is not thrown

/// -= Removes the event if it has been already added, this prevents multiple firing of the event
((System.Windows.Forms.WebBrowser)sender).Document.Click -= new System.Windows.Forms.HtmlElementEventHandler(testii);
((System.Windows.Forms.WebBrowser)sender).Document.Click += new System.Windows.Forms.HtmlElementEventHandler(testii);
7
  • 1
    Thank you. This came very handy in the same scenario (WebBrowser + HtmlElementEventHandler). Thanks for pointing this out
    – Odys
    Mar 19 '12 at 15:58
  • 2
    This should be the accepted answer as it is simple and requires no custom implementation. @LoxLox shows the same pattern as an implementation too. I didn't test, so I'm taking the comments at their word. Very nice.
    – Rafe
    Mar 23 '14 at 19:15
  • 4
    +1 I guess it's up to the programmer, but I would say this is the best (not the "neatest" to require the end-developer to do this perhaps, but it's not the event generator's fault that the subscriber can't prevent multiple subscriptions, so, make them figure out the removal, etc... besides, why prevent someone from subscribing the same handler more than once if the want to?) Jun 19 '14 at 15:31
  • 1
    This approach is confirmed in this answer by Jon Skeet to a similar question. (Although Jon also shows how to explicitly implement the event handler itself to prevent duplicates, rather than leaving the prevention of possible duplicates up to the subscriber.)
    – DavidRR
    Aug 12 '15 at 14:47
  • 1
    Also for this be aware of thread safety as stated : stackoverflow.com/questions/367523/… Mar 17 '20 at 17:12
159

Explicitly implement the event and check the invocation list. You'll also need to check for null:

using System.Linq; // Required for the .Contains call below:

...

private EventHandler foo;
public event EventHandler Foo
{
    add
    {
        if (foo == null || !foo.GetInvocationList().Contains(value))
        {
            foo += value;
        }
    }
    remove
    {
        foo -= value;
    }
}

Using the code above, if a caller subscribes to the event multiple times, it will simply be ignored.

14
  • 14
    You need to use the System.Linq using.
    – user65199
    Jun 18 '09 at 17:55
  • 6
    Contains is an extension method that lets you query a list. It comes with LINQ because it's a query aid. It's related to EventHandlers and invocation lists because those are things are lists that can be queried. Nov 11 '11 at 21:30
  • 3
    loved this! I removed the second condition in the if statement so i can attach only a single delegate to the Foo event, witch is what i needed! Great solution ;)
    – HypeZ
    Apr 28 '14 at 7:57
  • 3
    While this answer does solve the problem, engineers should be careful when prescribing event handler behavior at the event source rather than at the event handler itself. @PrimeTSS answer provides an alternative that leaves event handling behavior (like duplicate subscription) to the handler itself.
    – kdbanman
    Aug 11 '15 at 19:36
  • 2
    Calls to Invoke() will have to be switched from the public event to the private delegate, e.g. Foo?.Invoke() would now become foo?.Invoke(). Otherwise you get an error.
    – toddmo
    Oct 19 '17 at 16:19
43

I've tested each solution and the best one (considering performance) is:

private EventHandler _foo;
public event EventHandler Foo {

    add {
        _foo -= value;
        _foo += value;
    }
    remove {
        _foo -= value;
    }
}

No Linq using required. No need to check for null before cancelling a subscription (see MS EventHandler for details). No need to remember to do the unsubscription everywhere.

20

You really should handle this at the sink level and not the source level. That is, don't prescribe event handler logic at the event source - leave that to the handlers (the sinks) themselves.

As the developer of a service, who are you to say that sinks can only register once? What if they want to register twice for some reason? And if you are trying to correct bugs in the sinks by modifying the source, it's again a good reason for correcting these issues at the sink-level.

I'm sure you have your reasons; an event source for which duplicate sinks are illegal is not unfathomable. But perhaps you should consider an alternate architecture that leaves the semantics of an event intact.

1
  • This is an excellent engineering justification for this solution, which solves the problem on the event sink (subscriber/consumer/observer/handler) side instead of the source side.
    – kdbanman
    Aug 11 '15 at 19:28
14

You need to implement the add and remove accessors on the event, and then check the target list of the delegate, or store the targets in a list.

In the add method, you can use the Delegate.GetInvocationList method to obtain a list of the targets already added to the delegate.

Since delegates are defined to compare equal if they're linked to the same method on the same target object, you could probably run through that list and compare, and if you find none that compares equal, you add the new one.

Here's sample code, compile as console application:

using System;
using System.Linq;

namespace DemoApp
{
    public class TestClass
    {
        private EventHandler _Test;

        public event EventHandler Test
        {
            add
            {
                if (_Test == null || !_Test.GetInvocationList().Contains(value))
                    _Test += value;
            }

            remove
            {
                _Test -= value;
            }
        }

        public void OnTest()
        {
            if (_Test != null)
                _Test(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            TestClass tc = new TestClass();
            tc.Test += tc_Test;
            tc.Test += tc_Test;
            tc.OnTest();
            Console.In.ReadLine();
        }

        static void tc_Test(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Console.Out.WriteLine("tc_Test called");
        }
    }
}

Output:

tc_Test called

(ie. only once)

2
  • Please ignore my comment, I forgot the Linq using.
    – user65199
    Jun 18 '09 at 17:55
  • Cleanest solution (although not the shortest). Sep 19 '17 at 7:14
5

Microsoft's Reactive Extensions (Rx) framework can also be used to do "subscribe only once".

Given a mouse event foo.Clicked, here's how to subscribe and receive only a single invocation:

Observable.FromEvent<MouseEventArgs>(foo, nameof(foo.Clicked))
    .Take(1)
    .Subscribe(MyHandler);

...

private void MyHandler(IEvent<MouseEventArgs> eventInfo)
{
   // This will be called just once!
   var sender = eventInfo.Sender;
   var args = eventInfo.EventArgs;
}

In addition to providing "subscribe once" functionality, the RX approach offers the ability to compose events together or filter events. It's quite nifty.

1
  • 1
    Although this is technically correct, it answers the wrong question.
    – Alex
    Mar 8 '13 at 9:23
2

Create an Action instead of an event. Your class may look like:

public class MyClass
{
                // sender   arguments       <-----     Use this action instead of an event
     public Action<object, EventArgs> OnSomeEventOccured;

     public void SomeMethod()
     {
          if(OnSomeEventOccured!=null)
              OnSomeEventOccured(this, null);
     }

}
0

have your singleton object check it's list of who it notifies and only call once if duplicated. Alternatively if possible reject event attachment request.

0

In silverlight you need to say e.Handled = true; in the event code.

void image_MouseLeftButtonDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
{
    e.Handled = true; //this fixes the double event fire problem.
    string name = (e.OriginalSource as Image).Tag.ToString();
    DoSomething(name);
}

Please tick me if this helps.

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