33

How can I set a default value on a ForeignKey field in a django Model or AdminModel?

Something like this (but of course this doesn't work)...

created_by = models.ForeignKey(User, default=request.user)

I know I can 'trick' it in the view, but in terms of the AdminModel it doesn't seem possible.

1
  • 1
    Did Django have an AdminModel in 2009? I don't think it does today. Did you mean ModelAdmin?
    – djvg
    Jul 2, 2020 at 10:18

14 Answers 14

38
class Foo(models.Model):
    a = models.CharField(max_length=42)

class Bar(models.Model):
    b = models.CharField(max_length=42)
    a = models.ForeignKey(Foo, default=lambda: Foo.objects.get(id=1) )
6
16

For django 1.7 or greater,

Just create an ForeignKey object and save it. "default" value can be the id of the the object that should be linked by default.

For example,

created_by = models.ForeignKey(User, default=1)
11

Here's a solution that will work in Django 1.7. Instead of providing the default at the field definition, set it as null-able, but overide the 'save' function to fill it on the first time (while it's null):

class Foo(models.Model):
    a = models.CharField(max_length=42)

class Bar(models.Model):
    b = models.CharField(max_length=42)
    a = models.ForeignKey(Foo, null=True)

    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        if self.a is None:  # Set default reference
            self.a = Foo.objects.get(id=1)
        super(Bar, self).save(*args, **kwargs)
3
  • Do you really need to make the field nullable? I think, that the object is not saved yet, ie. it has not id yet, it isn't "cleaned" unless you put "full_clean" before the super(..save.. So I would change the condition to if self.id is None: and it should work without null=True.
    – Milano
    Feb 24, 2017 at 14:49
  • @MilanoSlesarik you might be right. The reason I put it there in the first place, is because it was a new field that I added to an existing model (with existing record rows), and so I had to allow it to be null.
    – o_c
    Feb 26, 2017 at 12:27
  • @o_c Not a good idea as save(..) is not called from batch update QuerySets.. unless you explicitly loop over each returned item and call save, which then defeats the purpose of using a batch update in the first place (and developers tend to forget). May 23, 2017 at 11:42
7

I've done this similarly to @o_c, but I'd rather use get_or_create than just plain pk.

class UserSettings(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=64, unique=True)
    # ... some other fields 

    @staticmethod
    def get_default_user_settings():
        user_settings, created = UserSettings.objects.get_or_create(
            name = 'Default settings'
        )
        return user_settings

class SiteUser(...):
    # ... some other fields

    user_settings = models.ForeignKey(
        to=UserSettings, 
        on_delete=models.SET_NULL, 
        null=True
    )

    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        if self.user_settings is None:
            self.user_settings = UserSettings.get_default_params()
        super(SiteUser, self).save(*args, **kwargs)
1
  • 1
    This answer should be higher, coz its simply and clever.
    – Take_Care_
    Sep 4, 2017 at 21:23
6

If you are using the development version of Django, you can implement the formfield_for_foreignkey() method on your AdminModel to set a default value.

0
2

As for me, for Django 1.7 its work, just pk:

category = models.ForeignKey(Category, editable=False, default=1)

but remember, that migration looks like

migrations.AlterField(
            model_name='item',
            name='category',
            field=models.ForeignKey(default=1, editable=False, to='item.Category'),
            preserve_default=True,
        ),

so, i don't think it's to be working with dynamic user pk.

1
def get_user_default_id():
    return 1

created_by = models.ForeignKey(User, default=get_user_default_id)
1
  • add some description too. Mar 6, 2016 at 4:09
1

This is a slight modification to the answer from o_c. It should save you one hit on the database. Notice in the save method I use self.a_id = 1 instead of self.a = Foo.objects.get(id=1). It has the same effect without having to query Foo.

class Foo(models.Model):
    a = models.CharField(max_length=42)

class Bar(models.Model):
    b = models.CharField(max_length=42)
    a = models.ForeignKey(Foo, null=True)

    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        if self.a is None:  # Set default reference
            self.a_id = 1
        super(Bar, self).save(*args, **kwargs)
1

For Django >= 1.7, you can set the default for a ForeignKey field in two different ways:

1) Directly as an integer

DEFAULT_CREATED_BY_USER = 42

class MyModel(Model):
    created_by = models.ForeignKey(User, default=DEFAULT_CREATED_BY_USER)

2) As a nonlambda callable returning an integer

You can also use a callable that can be resolved to a full module path. This means that lambdas does not work. But this will:

def default_created_by_user():
    return 42

class MyModel(Model):
    created_by = models.ForeignKey(User, default=default_created_by_user)

References:

0

Instead of lambda function use partial function. Lambda function is not serialization and hence gives error in migrations.

class Foo(models.Model):
    a = models.CharField(max_length=42)

class Bar(models.Model):
    b = models.CharField(max_length=42)
    a = models.ForeignKey(Foo, default=partial(Foo.objects.get, id=1 ))
0

You should have settings related to setting.AUTH_USER_MODEL in settings.py file.

You can look in below document:

"https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.10/topics/auth/customizing/#substituting-a-custom-user-model"

0

You can override the get_form method of your model admin.

admin.py

class YourModelAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    def get_form(self, request, obj=None, **kwargs):
        form = super(YourModelAdmin, self).get_form(request, obj, **kwargs)
        form.base_fields['created_by'].initial = request.user
    return form

admin.site.register(YourModel, YourModelAdmin)
0

Out of all along iterations to find a better solution, I find creating a small function will resolve the complexity of task substantially. Because some of the solutions are outdated or longer supported in newer Django versions.

def get_request_user():
    # or any complex query result to set default value in ForeignKey
    return request.user.id

Then you can pass above function as an argument in ForeignKey.

created_by = models.ForeignKey(User, default=get_request_user)
1
  • 1
    Unresolved reference "request". How would you pass request in here? ;)
    – nuts
    Jun 16, 2020 at 9:56
-2
class table1(models.Model):
    id = models.AutoField(primary_key=True)
    agentname = models.CharField(max_length=20)

class table1(models.Model):
    id = models.AutoField(primary_key=True)
    lastname = models.CharField(max_length=20)
    table1 = models.ForeignKey(Property)
1
  • Please add some explanation to the code, why does this answer the question?
    – MeanGreen
    Sep 30, 2015 at 14:27

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