25

From the link below, I know Java uses (hash & 0x7FFFFFFF) % tab.length to decide which slot of an array to put the {key, value} in.

http://grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/root/jdk/openjdk/7-b147/java/util/Hashtable.java#Hashtable.put%28java.lang.Object%2Cjava.lang.Object%29

My question is why Java first does hash & 0x7FFFFFFF? Is there any particular purpose?

  • 1
    I would assume it is to make sure that the key is always a positive integer, so that you don't attempt to use a negative array index. – mcfinnigan Feb 21 '12 at 15:59
  • Suppose it wouldn't. For example, what is -12345678 % 37? – Ingo Feb 21 '12 at 15:59
  • is "hash & (tab.length - 1)" of ConcurrentHashMap is same as "(hash & 0x7FFFFFFF) % tab.length" of hashtable ? – Kanagavelu Sugumar Oct 24 '13 at 19:34
31

Because -1 % 10 == -1 which you certainly don't want for indexing into an array. Forcing the sign bit to 0 avoids this problem.

  • yeah, damn it, I forgot the possible negative hashCode. thanks – Jackson Tale Feb 21 '12 at 16:06
  • so why not Math.abs(hashcode) % length ? – plzdontkillme Jul 27 '14 at 18:41
  • @plzdontkillme because math.abs doesn't always return a positive number. Also depending on compiler and architecture it's either a bit more or quite a lot more efficient. – Voo Jul 27 '14 at 21:22
  • Thanks Voo, much appreciated – plzdontkillme Jul 28 '14 at 15:41
  • @plzdontkillme to elaborate, Math.abs(-2^-31) is -2^-31 because there is no 2^31. – user592748 Jul 24 '16 at 11:42
35

Because:

  • 0x7FFFFFFF is 0111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 : all 1 except the sign bit.

  • (hash & 0x7FFFFFFF) will result in a positive integer.

  • (hash & 0x7FFFFFFF) % tab.length will be in the range of the tab length.

  • +1 Good Explanation. However I have a doubt. is "hash & (tab.length - 1)" of ConcurrentHashMap is same as "(hash & 0x7FFFFFFF) % tab.length" of hashtable ? – Kanagavelu Sugumar Oct 24 '13 at 19:33
  • Excellent Explanation! – Ricky Apr 11 '18 at 9:24
4

Note that Hashtable is more or less outdated and was replaced by HashMap. This one uses hash & (table.length-1) to achieve the same purpose.

It also does some bit shifting before as can be seen here. This is to cope with bad implementations of the hashCode() method which return numbers with a low diversity.

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