-1

I created a simple template. It gives me a warning: "No return, in function returning non-void".

template<typename T> struct test {
public:
    test & operator=(const T & new_value) {
        value = new_value;
    }
    operator T() const {
        return value;
    }
private:
    T value;
};

The warning is pointing at

test & operator=(const T & new_value) {
    value = new_value;
}

Can anyone offer some advice on how to fix this warning.

4
  • 11
    Uh.. return something? (Probably *this)
    – ildjarn
    Feb 21, 2012 at 21:56
  • Thanks, it works now. If I return *this, what does it actually return?
    – 2607
    Feb 21, 2012 at 21:58
  • 6
    I think it's time you started over with a good book...
    – ildjarn
    Feb 21, 2012 at 21:59
  • @2607, you already know the answer. You know this is a pointer to the object the function was called on, and you know * results in a reference to the pointer it's applied to. The method you're working in is a member of the test class, so this will point at a test object. Furthermore, you know test & is the return type of the function you're writing, and it signifies a reference to a test object. Thus, when you say *this and you get a reference to the object the method was called on, you'll get a reference to a test object, perfect for a function that returns test&. Feb 21, 2012 at 22:15

3 Answers 3

2

As the warning rightly says, your function isn't returning anything, even though it promises to return a test &. Simply end your function with return *this;, as is the usual convention for assignment operators.

1

Your operator= function doesn't return anything, when it's suppose to be returning a reference to an object of type test. So change this:

test& operator=(const T & new_value) 
{
    value = new_value;
}

To this:

test& operator=(const T & new_value) 
{
    value = new_value;

    //dereference the "this" pointer to get a lvalue reference to
    //the current object
    return *this; 
} 

Note that by accessing the implicit this pointer of a class (that is the pointer that is pointing to the instance class itself in memory that a method is being called on), and dereferencing it, you are accessing a lvalue reference of the class instance. So if you are returning an lvalue reference from your class method, that reference can then be passed to other functions that take references as arguments, and/or other methods can be called on that returned class instance. This allows the operator= to be used in "chains" of functions and method calls, where after the operator= method is called, another method is called on the resulting modified object instance. For instance, you could do something like:

test<int> a;
a.value = 5;

int b = (a = 6) + 5; //outputs the value 11

If you had created a print() method for your test object, you could also do something like the following:

test<int> a;
a.value = 7;
(a = 8).print();

This code returns the test class instance a after the operator= method, and then calls the print() method on that instance, printing out the value 8.

0

Your compiler is telling you that your operator= overload is incorrect. Writing an operator= overload function requires that you follow a specific format.

Test & Test::operator=( const Test & r )
{
    if( this != &r )
    {
        // copy member variables and initialize here
        m_MemberVar = r.m_MemberVar;
        ...
    }

    return *this;
}

NB

  1. You must return *this.
  2. It's good practise to ensure that you avoid copying an object to itself with

    if(this != &r){...}
    
  3. If you overload operator= for an object, you'll almost certainly need to provide a copy constuctor too. e.g.

    Test::Test( const Test & r ){...}
    

EDIT

You'd asked "if I return *this, what does it actually return" Well, It returns a reference to the current object. E.g. in the operator= overload definition above, the return type is declared as Test & (Test object reference).

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.