3

Given a file file.txt:

AAA 1 2 3 4 5 6 3 4 5 2 3 
BBB 3 2 3 34 56 1 
CCC 4 7 4 6 222 45 

Does any one have any ideas on how to calculate the mean, variance and range for each item, i.e. AAA, BBB, CCC respectively using Bash script? Thanks.

  • 1
    Why would you want to do this in Bash? – Johnsyweb Feb 22 '12 at 1:08
  • 1
    Note that bash proper does not do floating point arithmetic. You'll have to use something like bc – glenn jackman Feb 22 '12 at 1:18
  • 1
    awk will do this for you. – Adam Liss Feb 22 '12 at 1:22
  • To elaborate on the above comments: does all the logic actually need to be in Bash, or can you invoke an external utility such as awk or bc or (best yet) perl? In the latter case -- do you have any preference as to the utility? – ruakh Feb 22 '12 at 1:27
  • @ruakh Sorry for the mix-up..I'm new to Linux and kind of confused about the relationship between Bash and the utilities. Are't awk and bc commands of Bash? – Brian James Feb 22 '12 at 17:41
7

Here's a solution with awk, which calculates:

  • minimum = smallest value on each line
  • maximum = largest value on each line
  • average = μ = sum of all values on each line, divided by the count of the numbers.
  • variance = 1/n × [(Σx)² - Σ(x²)] where
    n = number of values on the line = NF - 1 (in awk, NF = number of fields on the line)
    (Σx)² = square of the sum of the values on the line
    Σ(x²) = sum of the squares of the values on the line

 

awk '{
  min = max = sum = $2;       # Initialize to the first value (2nd field)
  sum2 = $2 * $2              # Running sum of squares
  for (n=3; n <= NF; n++) {   # Process each value on the line
    if ($n < min) min = $n    # Current minimum
    if ($n > max) max = $n    # Current maximum
    sum += $n;                # Running sum of values
    sum2 += $n * $n           # Running sum of squares
  }
  print $1 ": min=" min ", avg=" sum/(NF-1) ", max=" max ", var=" ((sum*sum) - sum2)/(NF-1);
}' filename

Output:

AAA: min=1, avg=3.45455, max=6, var=117.273
BBB: min=1, avg=16.5, max=56, var=914.333
CCC: min=4, avg=48, max=222, var=5253

Note that you can save the awk script (everything between, but not including, the single-quotes) in a file, say called script, and execute it with awk -f script filename

  • Thank you so much for your help! – Brian James Feb 22 '12 at 22:00
  • 1
    The definition of variance seems to be wrong, should it be 1/n × Σ(x-μ)²? – Brian James Feb 22 '12 at 22:07
  • 1
    @Brian - yes, that's the definition, but the implementations are equivalent. It's a well-known optimization by statisticians; see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computational_formula_for_the_variance for a proof. – Adam Liss Feb 22 '12 at 23:20
  • Okay, I can do this on my own. Again, thanks a lot for your help. – Brian James Feb 23 '12 at 1:20
  • 1
    it works now. thank you so much. – Brian James Mar 1 '12 at 21:32
1

You can use python:

$ AAA() {  echo "$@" | python -c 'from sys import stdin; nums = [float(i) for i in stdin.read().split()]; print(sum(nums)/len(nums))'; }

$ AAA 1 2 3 4 5 6 3 4 5 2 3
3.45454545455
  • Thanks for speedy response. Is there any way that I can process the whole file? – Brian James Feb 22 '12 at 19:08
1

Part 1 (mean):

mean () {
  len=$#
  echo  $* | tr " " "\n" | sort -n | head -n $(((len+1)/2)) | tail -n 1
}

nMean () {
  echo -n "$1 " 
  shift 
  mean $* 
}

mean usage:

nMean AAA 3 4  5 6 3 4 3 6 2 4
4

Part 2 (variance):

variance () {
  count=$1
  avg=$2
  shift
  shift
  sum=0
  for n in $* 
  do 
    diff=$((avg-n))
    quad=$((diff*diff))
    sum=$((sum+quad))
  done 
  echo $((sum/count)) 
}

sum () {
  form="$(echo $*)"
  formula=${form// /+}
  echo $((formula))
}

nVariance () {
  echo -n "$1 " 
  shift 
  count=$#
  s=$(sum $*) 
  avg=$((s/$count))
  var=$(variance $count $avg $*)
  echo $var
}

usage:

nVariance AAA 3 4  5 6 3 4 3 6 2 4
1

Part 3 (range):

range () { 
  min=$1
  max=$1
  for p in $* ; do 
    (( $p < $min )) && min=$p
    (( $p > $max )) && max=$p
  done 
  echo $min ":" $max 
}

nRange () {
  echo -n "$1 " 
  shift 
  range $* 
}

usage:

nRange AAA 1 2 3 4 5 6 3 4 5 2 3 
AAA 1 : 6 

nX is short for named X, named mean, named variance, ... . Note, that I use integer arithmetic, which is, what is possible with the shell. To use floating point arithmetic, you would use bc, for instance. Here you loose precision, which might be acceptable for big natural numbers.

Process all 3 commands for an input line:

processLine () {
  nVariance $*
  nMean $*
  nRange $*
}

Read the data from a file, line by line:

# data:
# AAA 1 2 3 4 5 6 3 4 5 2 3 
# BBB 3 2 3 34 56 1 
# CCC 4 7 4 6 222 45 

while read line
do
  processLine $line
done < data

update:

Contrary to my expectation, it doesn't seem easy to handle an unknown number of arguments with functions in bc, for example min (3, 4, 5, 2, 6).

But the need to call bc can be reduced to 2 places, if the input are integers. I used a precision of 2 ("scale=2") - you may change this to your needs.

variance () {
  count=$1
  avg=$2
  shift
  shift
  sum=0
  for n in $* 
  do 
    diff="($avg-$n)"
    quad="($diff*$diff)"
    sum="($sum+$quad)"
  done 
#  echo "$sum/$count" 
  echo "scale=2;$sum/$count" | bc 
}

nVariance () {
  echo -n "$1 " 
  shift 
  count=$#
  s=$(sum $*) 
  avg=$(echo "scale=2;$s/$count" | bc)
  var=$(variance $count $avg $*)
  echo $var
}

The rest of the code can stay the same. Please verify that the formula for the variance is correct - I used what I had in mind:

For values (1, 5, 9), I sum up (15) divide by count (3) => 5. Then I create the diff to the avg for each value (-4, 0, 4), build the square (16, 0, 16), sum them up (32) and divide by count (3) => 10.66

Is this correct, or do I need a square root somewhere ;) ?

Note, that I had to correct the mean calculation. For 1, 5, 9, the mean is 5, not 1 - am I right? It now uses sort -n (numeric) and (len+1)/2.

  • Thanks a lot. but is there a way that I can process a whole profile? like I can use the command ./solution file.txt – Brian James Feb 22 '12 at 18:07
  • I added a function which calls the 3 calculations, and some codelines, to process a file, which is named 'data' in my example. Hope it helps. – user unknown Feb 23 '12 at 3:50
  • Thanks for your help~ – Brian James Feb 23 '12 at 17:04
  • is there a way to add bc to your code? Thanks – Brian James Mar 1 '12 at 21:13
  • @BrianJames: Well - if you allow to use bc, you gain the possibility to calculate floating point values, which might be very useful, but then you would solve the whole problem in bc - it would be a complete different thing. Give me some moments. – user unknown Mar 1 '12 at 21:19
0

There is a typo in the accepted answer that causes the variance to be miscalculated. In the print statement:

", var=" ((sum*sum) - sum2)/(NF-1)

should be:

", var=" (sum2 - ((sum*sum)/NF))/(NF-1)

Also, it is better to use something like Welford's algorithm to calculate variance; the algorithm in the accepted answer is unstable when the variance is small relative to the mean:

    foo="1 2 3 4 5 6 3 4 5 2 3";
    awk '{
      M = 0;
      S = 0;
      for (k=1; k <= NF; k++) { 
        x = $k;
        oldM = M;
        M = M + ((x - M)/k);
        S = S + (x - M)*(x - oldM);
      }
      var = S/(NF - 1);
      print " var=" var;
    }' <<< $foo

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