38

Yes, I have googled this question and even referred to my textbook (PHP by Don Gosselin) but I seriously can't seem to understand the explanation.

From my understanding:

echo = shows the final result of a function

return = returns the value from a function

I applied both echo and return in the following functions I can't see the difference or the 'effectiveness' of using return instead of echo.

<?php
echo "<h1 style='font-family:Helvetica; color:red'>Using <em>echo</em></h1>";
function add1($x, $y){
    $total = $x + $y;
    echo $total;
}
echo "<p>2 + 2 = ", add1(2, 2), "</p>";

echo "<h1 style='font-family:Helvetica; color:red'>Using <em>return</em></h1>";
function add2($x, $y){
    $total = $x + $y;
    return $total;
}
echo "<p>2 + 2 = ", add2(2, 2), "</p>";

?>

Both display the result! What am I not understanding?

  • i think the definition of echo is Output one or more strings, that definition itself is clear enough source: php.net/manual/en/function.echo.php – ianace Feb 22 '12 at 2:21
  • I always think of the "return" statement as a way to export data so that it can be reused. Returned data is delivered in its "raw" format. As for "echo", the data is always a string (even numbers) because it is targeting the computer monitor (or screen) which only accepts string values. – tony Sep 26 '17 at 11:56

13 Answers 13

105

I'm going to give a completely non-technical answer on this one.

Let's say that there is a girl named Sally Function. You want to know if she likes you or not. So since you're in grade school you decide to pass Sally a note (call the function with parameters) asking her if she likes you or not. Now what you plan on doing is asking her this and then telling everyone what she tells you. Instead, you ask her and then she tells everyone. This is equivalent to returning (you getting the information and doing something with it) vs her echoing (telling everyone without you having any control).

In your case what is happening is that when Sally echos she is taking the control from you and saying "I'm going to tell people this right now" instead of you being able to take her response and do what you wanted to do with it. The end result is, however, that you were telling people at the same time since you were echoing what she had already echoed but didn't return (she cut you off in the middle of you telling your class if she liked you or not)

  • 1
    You couldn't have explained it simpler! Although I still have a bit of difficulty trying to understand why I can't just echo within the function and then echo the function I do understand what goes behind the scenes between echo and return thanks to your analogy :D – Joe Morales Feb 22 '12 at 15:18
  • 20
    Consider if you were wanting to save the results in variable so you could use it later. If your function echos instead of returning, you aren't actually getting anything to save in the variable. – jprofitt Feb 22 '12 at 15:43
  • Oh I see!!!! I think I'm finally getting it :-D … Now I just need to know why the results from an echo and return could be different lol (see @Aron Cederholm's post below) Thank you very much jprofitt — I appreciate your help! – Joe Morales Feb 22 '12 at 16:10
  • what is a better programming practise to use echo or return in php functions? What is more secure ? – csandreas1 Mar 13 '18 at 14:10
43

Consider the following:

<?php
function sayHelloLater(){
    return "Hello";
}

function sayGoodbyeNow(){
    echo "Goodbye";
}

$hello = sayHelloLater(); // "Hello" returned and stored in $hello 
$goodbye = sayGoodbyeNow(); // "Goodbye" is echo'ed and nothing is returned

echo $hello; // "Hello" is echo'ed
echo $goodbye; // nothing is echo'ed
?>

You might expect the output to be:

HelloGoodbye

The actual output is:

GoodbyeHello

The reason is that "Goodbye" is echo'ed (written) as output, as soon as the function is called. "Hello", on the other hand, is returned to the $hello variable. the $goodbye is actually empty, since the goodbye function does not return anything.

23

I see you are posting comments still which suggest you are confused because you don't understand the flow of the code. Perhaps this will help you (particularly with Mathias R. Jessen's answer).

So take these two functions again:

function sayHelloLater() {
    return 'Hello';
}

function sayGoodbyeNow() {
    echo 'Goodbye';
}

Now if you do this:

$hello = sayHelloLater();
$goodbye = sayGoodbyeNow();

echo $hello;
echo $goodbye;

You will be left with 'GoodbyeHello' on your screen.

Here's why. The code will run like this:

$hello = sayHelloLater();  ---->-------->-------->------->------>--
                                                                  ¦
  ¦           ^                                                   ¦
  ¦           ¦                                           Call the function
  v           ¦                                                   ¦
  ¦           ^                                                   ¦
  ¦           ¦                                                   v
  ¦
  v         "return" simply sends back                 function sayHelloLater() {
  ¦          'Hello' to wherever the     <----<----        return 'Hello';
  ¦             function was called.                   }
  v           Nothing was printed out
  ¦          (echoed) to the screen yet.
  ¦
  v

$hello variable now has whatever value
the sayHelloLater() function returned,
so $hello = 'Hello', and is stored for
whenever you want to use it.

  ¦
  ¦
  v
  ¦
  ¦
  v

$goodbye = sayGoodbyeNow();  ---->-------->-------->------->------
                                                                 ¦
  ¦              ^                                               ¦
  ¦              ¦                                       Call the function
  v              ¦                                               ¦
  ¦              ^                                               ¦
  ¦              ¦                                               v
  ¦              ¦
  v              ¦                                    function sayGoodbyeNow() {
  ¦                                                       echo 'Goodbye';
  ¦        The function didn't return                 }
  ¦        anything, but it already
  v         printed out 'Goodbye'                                ¦
  ¦                                                              v
  ¦           ^
  ¦           ¦                                    "echo" actually prints out
  v           <-----------<-----------<---------     the word 'Goodbye' to
  ¦                                                 the page immediately at
  ¦                                                       this point.
  ¦
  v

Because the function sayGoodbyeNow() didn't
return anything, the $goodbye variable has
a value of nothing (null) as well.

  ¦
  ¦
  ¦
  v
  ¦
  ¦
  ¦
  v

echo $hello;  -------->------->   Prints 'Hello' to the screen at
                                  this point. So now your screen says
  ¦                               'GoodbyeHello' because 'Goodbye' was
  ¦                               already echoed earlier when you called
  ¦                               the sayGoodbyeNow() function.
  v

echo $goodbye;  ------>------->   This variable is null, remember? So it
                                  echoes nothing.
  ¦
  ¦
  ¦
  v

And now your code is finished and you're left with
'GoodbyeHello' on your screen, even though you echoed
$hello first, then $goodbye.
  • Nicely explained. – Bugfixer Oct 6 '15 at 3:00
  • Thanks explained it well – Matt Nov 29 '15 at 14:32
6

with return the function itself can be treated somewhat like a variable.

So

return add1(2, 3) + add1(10, 10);

will output:

25

while

echo add2(2, 3) + add2(10, 10);

will output:

5
20
0

As there is no result of add2. What it does is only echo'ing out stuff. Never actually returning a value back to the code that called it.

Btw, you are not dumb. You are just a beginner. We are all beginners in the beginning, and there is a certain threshold you'll need to get over in the beginning. You will probably have a lot of "dumb" questions in the beginning, but just keep on trying and above all experiment, and you will learn.

  • I see what is going on over here but don't know 'why' ! I mean, why in the first instance it IS adding the results but the second one doesn't :-S – Joe Morales Feb 22 '12 at 16:11
  • A function is much lika a magic box. You put something in it (parameters) and pull a lever, and something either happens or something is returned. E.g. you put an apple in a black box, and press start. After a lot of sounds and noises the box suddenly plants an apple tree in the ground which instantly grows to full size. This is what the black box/function performs. But when you open box there is not an apple left but only an apple crot. This is what the function returns. – Aron Cederholm Feb 22 '12 at 20:25
  • Now, consider add1 and add2. Add1 is a black box with two input trays on the front. In the first tray you put a huge cage of apples, too many for you to count. In the second tray you put another huge cage of apples, also too many to count. When you press start you hear some noice and from the back of the box comes a cage of all apples combined (91.218 apples in all). – Aron Cederholm Feb 22 '12 at 20:28
  • Then you put two other cages of apple in the incoming trays of the add2 black box. There is a lot of sound and then nothing comes out of the black box. Instead the black box produces an arm that writes "91.218" on a white board nearby. – Aron Cederholm Feb 22 '12 at 20:31
  • Now consider that you are really the computer. You are a blind robot that only does what you are told to do. In the first example you can simply take the resulting cage of apples and count them and you will instantly know (because you are so fast) that there are 91.218 apples in the cage. But in the other example, you didn't get a return cage and as you are blind you really have no clue what the black box wrote on the white board. – Aron Cederholm Feb 22 '12 at 20:33
5

So, basically you’ll want to use echo whenever you want to output something to the browser, and use return when you want to end the script or function and pass on data to another part of your script.

  • 1
    This does not provide an answer to the question. – Egor Rogov Nov 22 '15 at 18:59
4

there is couple of difference i found after testing it

1) return just return the value of a function to get it used later after storing it in a variable but echo simply print the value as you call the function and returns nothing.

here is the short example for this

function myfunc() { echo "i am a born programmer"; }

$value = myfunc(); \\ it is going to print the 'i am a born programmer' as function would be called

if(empty($value)===true)  {
  echo "variable is empty because function returns nothing"; 

}

4

The difference between the response of a function is that " echo" send something to the browser (DOM ) , while " return" returns something to the caller.

function myFunction(
    return 5;
}

$myVar= myFunction(); //myVar equals 5
echo $myVar; // will show a "5 " on the screen


function myFunction() {
    echo 5;
}

$myVar= myFunction(); // myVar equals 0, but the screen gets a "5"
echo $myVar; // a zero on the screen next to "5" printed by function appears .
3

Using a slight modification of your example:

<?php

echo "<h1 style='font-family:Helvetica; color:red'>Using <em>echo</em></h1>";

function add1($x, $y){
    $total = $x + $y;
    echo $total;
}

$result = add1(2, 2);

echo "<p>2 + 2 = ", $result, "</p>";

echo "<h1 style='font-family:Helvetica; color:red'>Using <em>return</em></h1>";

function add2($x, $y){
    $total = $x + $y;
    return $total;
}

$result = add2(2, 2);

echo "<p>2 + 2 = ", $result, "</p>";

?>

Can you see the difference?

  • 1
    -1 for no actual explanation! – byronyasgur May 28 '12 at 23:50
3

echo renders the text etc into the document, return returns data from a function/method etc to whatever called it. If you echo a return, it'll render it (Assuming it's text/number etc - not an object etc).

2

Behind both functions you have a line, which toggles your output:

echo "<p>2 + 2 = ", add1(2, 2), "</p>";
echo "<p>2 + 2 = ", add2(2, 2), "</p>";

echo prints the value so you can read it. return returns the value to save in for example variables.

$result = add2(2, 2);
// do more with result ... ?
// output the result
echo $result;
1

Basically, to output PHP into HTML we should use echo. In other word, we need to echo it.

These two example below will give a clear understanding :

function myfunction() {
// script content here, and sample out maybe like this :

return $result; ---> sample 1
echo $result;   ---> sample 2

}

to show $result in html for each sample :

for sample 1 we should use <?php echo $result ?>

for sample 2 we should use <?php $result ?>

On sample 2 we do not need to echo it, because we have echo it inside the function.

0

One thing that I learned while doing changes in Buddypress is that it uses the return mainly on nested core functions and then with the use of sprintf it binds dynamic variables into the HTML and return that chunck of html back to the main function where it was called and only then it echo out once at the main function. By doing so the code becomes modular and easier to debug.

0

The most important difference between echo and return in my viewpoint is:
the data type of result for each one.
when we write some functions like below:

<?php
    $value = 150;

    function firstFunction($value) {
        return $value + 1;
    }
    echo firstFunction($value) . '<br />';

    function secondFunction($value) {
        echo $value + 1;
    }
    secondFunction($value);

and yes, both of them will give us 151 as an output value.
But, in the return case, we will print firstFunction($value) as an int data type.
Otherhand, in the echo case, we will print secondFunction($value) as a NULL data type.
You can try printing each one with var_dump() function to understand what I meant.

<?php
    var_dump(firstFunction($value)); ?>
    <br />
<?php
    var_dump(secondFunction($value));

That difference will benefit us when we treat some values that returns from databases, especially in the math operations like (post views count) or something like that.
That'll make sense over what has been written here.
hope I have explained it the easy way.

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