2

I have a sequence of double (with no duplicates) and I need to sort them. Is filling a vector and then sorting it faster than inserting the values in a set?

Is this question answerable without a knowledge of the implementation of the standard library (and without a knowledge of the hardware on which the program will run) but just with the information provided by the C++ standard?

#include <vector>
#include <set>
#include <algorithm>
#include <random>
#include <iostream>

std::uniform_real_distribution<double> unif(0,10000);
std::default_random_engine re;

int main()
{
    std::vector< double > v;
    std::set< double > s;
    std::vector< double > r;
    size_t sz = 10;
    for(size_t i = 0; i < sz; i++) {
        r.push_back( unif(re) );
    }

    for(size_t i = 0; i < sz; i++) {
        v.push_back(r[i]);
    }
    std::sort(v.begin(),v.end());

    for(size_t i = 0; i < sz; i++) {
        s.insert(r[i]);
    }

    return 0;
}
5

From the C++ standard, all we can say is that they both have the same asymptotic complexity (O(n*log(n))).

The set may be faster for large objects that can't be efficiently moved or swapped, since the objects don't need to be moved more than once. The vector may be faster for small objects, since sorting it involves no pointer updates and less indirection.

Which is faster in any given situation can only be determined by measuring (or a thorough knowledge of both the implementation and the target platform).

2

The use of vector may be faster because of data cache factors as the data operated upon will be in a more coherent memory region (probably).

The vector will also have less memory overhead per-value.

If you can, reserve the vector size before inserting data to minimize effort during filling the vector with values.

  • reserving space for the vector would be a bit "unfair" for the set, or no? – Alessandro Jacopson Feb 22 '12 at 18:52
  • 1
    @uvts_cvs: not at all, use what you got. – Mooing Duck Feb 22 '12 at 19:02
  • 4
    How is that unfair? It's a distinct advantage of the vector. – edA-qa mort-ora-y Feb 22 '12 at 19:02
  • @uvts_cvs Uhm no, as that's one of the advantages vector offers over set. You don't want to bias the outcome towards set, don't you? – Christian Rau Feb 22 '12 at 19:08
  • @ChristianRau No, I do not want to bias the outcome :-) – Alessandro Jacopson Feb 22 '12 at 19:12
0

In terms of complexity both should be the same i.e, nlog(n).

0

The answer is not trivial. If you have 2 main sections in your software: 1st setup, 2nd lookup and lookup is used more than setup: the sorted vector could be faster, because of 2 reasons:

  1. lower_bound <algorithm> function is faster than the usual tree implementation of <set>,
  2. std::vector memory is allocated less heap page, so there will be less page faults while you are looking for an element.

If the usage is mixed, or lookup is not more then setup, than <set> will be faster. More info: Scott Meyers: Effective STL, Item 23.

  • Not sure what you mean by "heap page". Even if you even happen to be on an architecture where the concept of a memory page makes sense, nothing says the vector must be smaller than a page... – Billy ONeal Feb 22 '12 at 21:12
  • @BillyONeal: true. I modify my anser. – Naszta Feb 22 '12 at 21:14
0

Since you said sorting in a range, you could use partial_sort instead of sorting the entire collection.
If we don't want to disturb the existing collection and want to have a new collection with sorted data and no duplicates, then std::set gives us a straight forward solution.

#include <vector>
#include <set>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;


int main()
{
    int arr[] = { 1, 3, 4, 1, 6, 7, 9, 6 , 3, 4, 9 };
    vector<int> ints ( arr, end(arr));
    const int ulimit = 5;
    auto last = ints.begin();
    advance(last, ulimit);
    set<int> sortedset;
    sortedset.insert(ints.begin() , last);

    for_each(sortedset.begin(), sortedset.end(), [](int x) { cout << x << "\n"; });
}

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