8

So here's the issue, my mvc3 project uses Dependency Injection and has a base Generic IRepository class from which other repositories derive.

So I can co ahead and do this in a controller:

public class SomethingController
{
    IOrderRepository repository;

    public SomethingController(IOrderRepository repo)
    {
        this.repository = repo;
    }

    public ActionResult SaveOrder(Order order)
    {
        repository.add(order)
        unitOfWork.CommitChanges();  // THIS works!
    }
}

But now i need to use one of those repositories in a custom static non-controller like this:

static class OrderParser
{
    private IOrderRepository repo;

    public static DoWork()
    {
        repo = DependencyResolver.Current.GetService<IOrderRepository>();

        var ordersInDB = repo.GetAllOrders(); //THIS works!

        //But!
        var ordersForInsertion = new List<Order>();


        //do some backgroundworker magic                     
        //fetch txt files from an ftp server
        var ordersForInsertion = ParseTextFilesIntoOrders();

        foreach order in ordersForInsertion 
             repo.add(order)
        unitOfWork.CommitChanges();
        // THIS doesnt commit anything into the database
        // It also doesnt throw any exceptions
        // and repo isnt null or any of that
    }
}

So, as a test, i tried doing:

repo = DependencyResolver.Current.GetService<IOrderRepository>();

inside a controller class like in the first example to see if it also didnt commit stuff, and it doesn't. (Doing it the right way [injecting repositories and the unitOfWork trough the constructors] works!)

So it has to be something to do with the DependencyResolver, right?

Note: if there is any more code you need me to post, ask away and I'll edit it in here in a flash!

Note2: Thanx!

EDIT1:

Regarding w0lf's super fast answer Here's some more info:

My OrderParser class implments a backgroundWorker which is supposed to:

  • Sleep for an hour
  • List all the files (plain txt files) in an FTP server.
  • Discard the ones that are already parsed into the db.
  • Parse the new files into Order objects.
  • Commit the objects into db.
  • Start all over and over till the power goes out or something :)

All that has to happen without any user action, meaning, the action is not originated from a controller, hence all I do is:

in my bootstrapper class

Initialise()
{
    //Unrelated stuff
    OrderParser.DoWork()
}

And that's also why I implemented it as a static class ( easily changable to a non-static )

EDIT2:

It would be something like:

class OrderParser
{
    private IOrderRepository repo;

    public OrderParser(IOrderRepository foo)
    {
        this.repo = foo;
    }
    public static DoWork()
    {
        //use repo var!
    }
}

But then when i instance it in the bootstrapper Initialize() method, how would i do that, e.g.:

class bootstrapper
{
    Initialize()
    {
        var parser = new OrderParser(/*how do i pass the dependency here?*/)
        parser.DoWork();
    }
}

EDIT3:

Here's some more testing, please bear with me!

Here's my OrderParser again:

class OrderParser
{
    public OrderParser(IOrderRepository foo, IContext unitOfWork)
    {
        foo.getall(); 

        foo.add(some_order);
        unitOfWork.commit(); 

    }
}

Test1:

public class SomeController
{
    IOrderRepository repository;

    public SomeController(IOrderRepository repo)
    {
        this.repository = repo;
    }

    public ActionResult SomeMethod(Order order)
    {
        repository.GetAll();    //WORKS

        repository.add(order)
        unitOfWork.CommitChanges();  // WORKS
    }
}

TEST2:

class bootstrapper
{
    Initialize()
    {
        //Build unity container..
        //set resolver..

        var parser = new OrderParser(container.Resolve<IOrderRepository>, container.Resolve<IContext>)
        //can getAll, cant commit.
    }
}

TEST3:

public class SomeController
{
    IOrderRepository controllers_repository;

    public SomeController(IOrderRepository repo)
    {
        this.controllers_repository = repo;
    }

    public ActionResult SomeMethod(Order order)
    {
        var parser = new OrderParser(DependencyResolver.Current.GetService<IOrderRepository>,
        DependencyResolver.Current.GetService<IContext>)   
        //can do getall, no commits


        var parser = new OrderParser(controllers_repository, controllers_icontext)
        // obviously works (can getall and commit)
    }
}

By the way, when i say "can't commit" it's not that i get an exception or the repositories are null, nope. the code runs as if it were okay, only the DB won't change.

10
  • what has the life cycle of the component been set to in the DI container? i.e. in Windsor there is per web request/thread/singleton/transient. also what is the life cycle like for the unit of work? I suspect that when you get the repo from the dependency resolver it may not be sharing in the same life cycle as your unit of work.
    – Juan Ayala
    Commented Feb 22, 2012 at 19:56
  • Yeah that may be what's happening, how do i check the lifecycle of the component? i see nothing like that in my DI container, sorry for the noobness :/
    – seed_87
    Commented Feb 22, 2012 at 20:17
  • 1
    You have MVC code that sleeps for an hour? why not just make this a service, or scheduled application? What happens if the worker process shuts down? Commented Feb 22, 2012 at 21:16
  • What DI you using? In windsor the default lifecycle for any component is singleton.
    – Juan Ayala
    Commented Feb 22, 2012 at 22:29
  • 1
    yes, it can still shut down. It's just a thread in your worker process and IIS can kill your worker process. This would be best in a service or if you need this to run only every hour, then you can also just schedule as task in windows and create a console app to do it. A simple service is fairly easy though: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zt39148a(v=vs.100).aspx Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 17:26

3 Answers 3

6

One possible solution is to make the OrderParser class non-static and inject an instance of it in the constructor of the Controller that triggers the action (DoWork).

Then make OrderParser's constructor take an IOrderRepository parameter and the IoC container will gladly take care of it.

Also, beware of things like:

DependencyResolver.Current.GetService<ISomeInterface>();

This is called Service Locator and it's considered to be an anti-pattern. Avoid it if possible.

Basically, the only place where you should reference DependencyResolver.Current.GetService is your implementation of IControllerFactory that enables DI in the first place.

Update:

It would be best if you did this in another application than your MVC website. Two alternatives would be:

  • a Windows Service that performs that action based on a timer
  • a Console application that is run using Windows Task Scheduler every hour

These, being separate applications would have their own Composition roots that would deal with the object instantiation / dependency injection issue.

If, however, you are constrained to do this from your web app (for example - you have a hosting that only allows web apps), then you may find it acceptable to make an exception to the "Don't use the Dependencey Resolver directly" rule and do somehing like this on the application startup:

var runner = DependencyResolver.Current.GetService<OrderParsingRunner>();
runner.StartWorking();

Of course, the OrderParsingRunner class would look something like this:

public class OrderParsingRunner
{
    private readonly OrderParser orderParser;

    public OrderParsingRunner(OrderParser orderParser)
    {
        this.orderParser = orderParser;
    }

    public StartWorking()
    {
        TaskFactory.StartNew(() => 
            { 
                DoWorkHourly();
            });
    }

    private DoWorkHourly()
    {
        while(true)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromHours(1));

            orderParser.DoWork();
        }
    }
}

Disclaimer: I haven't actually compiled/run this code, I just wrote it to illustrate the concept.

Please note that this is a workaround rather than an actual solution. It's recommended that you use another application for the background tasks if possible.

7
  • @seed Even with your edit this answer is fully valid. You should do the service location in your Initialise method, and not in OrderParser. Commented Feb 22, 2012 at 20:17
  • @CodeInChaos i'm sorry, i didn't quite understand your answer :/
    – seed_87
    Commented Feb 22, 2012 at 20:29
  • @seed_87 what @CodeInChaos meant is that you should avoid instantiating dependencies directly in the OrderParser class; these should be injected from the component that enables DI. Commented Feb 22, 2012 at 21:14
  • @w0lf thats exactly my problem, i'm constrained to do this from the web app, please see my EDIT3 above with some testing i did which illustrates how DependencyResolver.Current.GetService<>(); wont let me commit to the db!
    – seed_87
    Commented Feb 23, 2012 at 13:47
  • @w0lf ill give your code try and let you know how it turned out, thanx!
    – seed_87
    Commented Feb 23, 2012 at 13:49
2

You shouldn't need static helper classes when using DI. You can treat everything as a "service" and declare your dependencies in your constructor. That's how I think about it. Then everything just gets created for you as you need it.

So I would change your static class to a non-static and inject it where needed via the constructor.

Answer for Edit 2

Pass your container in to the bootstrap class.

class bootstrapper
{
    Initialize(DependencyResolver container)
    {
        var parser = new OrderParser(container.Resolve<IOrderRepository>());
        parser.DoWork();
    }
}

Edit

I would actually do this ...

var parser = container.Resolve<OrderParser>();

and let the dependency resolver figure everything out!

3
  • Okay, the code runs and works, but even if i do a unitOfWork.CommitChanges(), nothing gets commited :/
    – seed_87
    Commented Feb 22, 2012 at 21:01
  • could be lifetimes coming in to play. perhaps your context/repo has expired by the time you come to commit the changes and the DI has spun up a new one for you. Sounds like you've got some debugging to do :) Commented Feb 22, 2012 at 21:04
  • Ill look into dependency lifetimes. Thank you! ill report back in a bit!
    – seed_87
    Commented Feb 22, 2012 at 21:24
1

Since this is a background task, don't run this in a web application. Instead use a service or scheduled application in windows. Youc an then resolve your reference during application initialization or using a [Dependency] attribute

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zt39148a(v=vs.100).aspx http://stackoverflow.com/questions/888479/using-unity-framework-inject-into-system-windows-forms-form-page

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