1111

How can I convert a character to its ASCII code using JavaScript?

For example:

get 10 from "\n".

3
  • 20
    Please note that the String.prototype.charCodeAt() method suggested in most answers will return the UTF-16 code unit (not even the full proper UTF-16 encoding due to historical reasons). Only the first 128 Unicode code points are a direct match of the ASCII character encoding. Jan 16 '18 at 13:15
  • @ÁlvaroGonzález This is an importan caveat. How do I get the ASCII code instead, e.g. 128 for ?
    – simlev
    Oct 15 '21 at 8:17
  • 3
    @simlev ASCII does not have any symbol, it was created decades before the currency. 128 is its encoding in Windows-1252. Converting between random encodings is a problem of its own. Oct 15 '21 at 8:31

15 Answers 15

1674
"\n".charCodeAt(0);
14
  • 744
    The opposite of this is String.fromCharCode(10).
    – viam0Zah
    May 1 '11 at 9:38
  • 215
    Fun fact: you don’t really need the 0 (first argument value) — just "\n".charCodeAt() will do. Oct 17 '11 at 9:40
  • 53
    @MathiasBynens: and fortunately this is documented: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/…. "if it is not a number, it defaults to 0"
    – tokland
    Nov 15 '11 at 19:46
  • 14
    You should point out that unlike String.fromCharCode( asciiNumVal ), stringInstance.charCodeAt( index ) is not a static method of class String
    – bobobobo
    Sep 12 '12 at 19:09
  • 29
    @Mathias Bynens, It certainly does default to zero but I just ran a just out of interest test on performance and it performs **relatively badly compared using 0. jsperf.com/default-to-0-vs-0/4 ** Its a relative difference only, either way its very very quick. May 9 '13 at 12:35
445

String.prototype.charCodeAt() can convert string characters to ASCII numbers. For example:

"ABC".charCodeAt(0) // returns 65

For opposite use String.fromCharCode(10) that convert numbers to equal ASCII character. This function can accept multiple numbers and join all the characters then return the string. Example:

String.fromCharCode(65,66,67); // returns 'ABC'

Here is a quick ASCII characters reference:

{
"31": "",      "32": " ",     "33": "!",     "34": "\"",    "35": "#",    
"36": "$",     "37": "%",     "38": "&",     "39": "'",     "40": "(",    
"41": ")",     "42": "*",     "43": "+",     "44": ",",     "45": "-",    
"46": ".",     "47": "/",     "48": "0",     "49": "1",     "50": "2",    
"51": "3",     "52": "4",     "53": "5",     "54": "6",     "55": "7",    
"56": "8",     "57": "9",     "58": ":",     "59": ";",     "60": "<",    
"61": "=",     "62": ">",     "63": "?",     "64": "@",     "65": "A",    
"66": "B",     "67": "C",     "68": "D",     "69": "E",     "70": "F",    
"71": "G",     "72": "H",     "73": "I",     "74": "J",     "75": "K",    
"76": "L",     "77": "M",     "78": "N",     "79": "O",     "80": "P",    
"81": "Q",     "82": "R",     "83": "S",     "84": "T",     "85": "U",    
"86": "V",     "87": "W",     "88": "X",     "89": "Y",     "90": "Z",    
"91": "[",     "92": "\\",    "93": "]",     "94": "^",     "95": "_",    
"96": "`",     "97": "a",     "98": "b",     "99": "c",     "100": "d",    
"101": "e",    "102": "f",    "103": "g",    "104": "h",    "105": "i",    
"106": "j",    "107": "k",    "108": "l",    "109": "m",    "110": "n",    
"111": "o",    "112": "p",    "113": "q",    "114": "r",    "115": "s",    
"116": "t",    "117": "u",    "118": "v",    "119": "w",    "120": "x",    
"121": "y",    "122": "z",    "123": "{",    "124": "|",    "125": "}",    
"126": "~",    "127": ""
}
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  • 38
    Better ascii reference: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII - I'm pretty proud the coloring I did for the tables on that page remains there after almost 10 years : )
    – B T
    Apr 25 '14 at 19:00
  • 9
    @theGrayFox C:\> man ascii gives Bad command or file name
    – Déjà vu
    Jun 12 '15 at 6:53
  • Note that these methods are UTF-16 compatible, meaning depending on the input string, charCodeAt can extend far past 1 byte ASCII values 0-127. Don't assume it is in that range if arbitrary string input is being accepted and handled by javascript. Aug 20 '19 at 21:11
  • @e2-e4 dear Developer your on the wrong OS. man is a linux command. Not sure of the windows equivalent. Probably safer using a search engine on a browser to search for 'man ascii' on windows, one result -> man7.org/linux/man-pages/man7/ascii.7.html
    – tgkprog
    Mar 24 '21 at 15:46
51

If you have only one char and not a string, you can use:

'\n'.charCodeAt();

omitting the 0...

It used to be significantly slower than 'n'.charCodeAt(0), but I've tested it now and I do not see any difference anymore (executed 10 billions times with and without the 0). Tested for performance only in Chrome and Firefox.

1
  • 11
    This actually takes longer. It's faster to just use the zero. (On my computer, it took ~twice as long—0.055s vs. 0.126s through a few ten thousand iterations)
    – royhowie
    Nov 27 '14 at 0:09
31

While the other answers are right, I prefer this way:

function ascii (a) { return a.charCodeAt(0); }

Then, to use it, simply:

var lineBreak = ascii("\n");

I am using this for a small shortcut system:

$(window).keypress(function(event) {
  if (event.ctrlKey && event.which == ascii("s")) {
    savecontent();
    }
  // ...
  });

And you can even use it inside map() or other methods:

var ints = 'ergtrer'.split('').map(ascii);
1
  • 1
    Just for the beauty a new ES6 way to write it: const ascii = a => a.charCodeAt(0);
    – axkibe
    Nov 29 '17 at 9:10
25

For those that want to get a sum of all the ASCII codes for a string:

'Foobar'
  .split('')
  .map(x=>x.charCodeAt(0))
  .reduce((a,b)=>a+b);

Or, ES6:

[...'Foobar']
  .map(char => char.charCodeAt(0))
  .reduce((current, previous) => previous + current)
3
  • 1
    Double-check your last line.
    – Ypnypn
    Oct 14 '15 at 21:43
  • Elegant! as a function: function ascii(str) { return str .split('') .map(function (char) { return char + ": " + String(char.charCodeAt(0)) + "\n"; }) .reduce(function (current, previous) { return current + previous; }); } Dec 1 '16 at 19:47
  • 3
    [...'Foobar'].reduce((i,s)=>s.charCodeAt(0)+i,0)
    – Nick
    Dec 5 '16 at 14:48
10

JavaScript stores strings as UTF-16 (double byte) so if you want to ignore the second byte just strip it out with a bitwise & operator on 0000000011111111 (ie 255):

'a'.charCodeAt(0) & 255 === 97; // because 'a' = 97 0 
'b'.charCodeAt(0) & 255 === 98; // because 'b' = 98 0 
'✓'.charCodeAt(0) & 255 === 19; // because '✓' = 19 39
4
  • why would you want to ignore the second byte?
    – Roberg
    Mar 13 '17 at 10:19
  • 3
    Question is asking about producing ASCII from a UTF-16 string (double byte). Sooner or later you will get non-ascii codes if you fail to ignore the second byte. Mar 13 '17 at 11:24
  • 2
    @Steven de Salas - Your 'solution' to getting non-ASCII codes for non-ASCII characters is to return the wrong ASCII code??
    – Carl Smith
    Sep 12 '19 at 9:21
  • @CarlSmith, not the wrong one. Just to strip out the non-ascii component of the character. If you are working with single bytes this is useful. Your project might need a different solution though. Sep 14 '19 at 6:22
10

To ensure full Unicode support and reversibility, consider using:

'\n'.codePointAt(0);

This will ensure that when testing characters over the UTF-16 limit, you will get their true code point value.

e.g.

'𐩕'.codePointAt(0); // 68181
String.fromCodePoint(68181); // '𐩕'

'𐩕'.charCodeAt(0);  // 55298
String.fromCharCode(55298);  // '�'
1
  • It might also be useful to convert the special character to hex notation, since some text editors might not work properly having to deal directly with such characters. EG: alert(str.hexEncode().hexDecode()); Nov 11 '19 at 2:55
3

To convert a String to a cumulative number:

const stringToSum = str => [...str||"A"].reduce((a, x) => a += x.codePointAt(0), 0);

console.log(stringToSum("A"));              // 65
console.log(stringToSum("Roko"));           // 411
console.log(stringToSum("Stack Overflow")); // 1386

Use case:

Say you want to generate different background colors depending on a username:

const stringToSum = str => [...str||"A"].reduce((a, x) => a += x.codePointAt(0), 0);

const UI_userIcon = user => {
  const hue = (stringToSum(user.name) - 65) % 360; // "A" = hue: 0
  console.log(`Hue: ${hue}`);
  return `<div class="UserIcon" style="background:hsl(${hue}, 80%, 60%)" title="${user.name}">
    <span class="UserIcon-letter">${user.name[0].toUpperCase()}</span>
  </div>`;
};

[
  {name:"A"},
  {name:"Amanda"},
  {name:"amanda"},
  {name:"Anna"},
].forEach(user => {
  document.body.insertAdjacentHTML("beforeend", UI_userIcon(user));
});
.UserIcon {
  width: 4em;
  height: 4em;
  border-radius: 4em;
  display: inline-flex;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
}

.UserIcon-letter {
  font: 700 2em/0 sans-serif;
  color: #fff;
}

2
  • Why the number "65"? What does that represent?
    – Reality
    Feb 19 '21 at 16:58
  • -65 is totally optional. Since ASCII "A" character numeric = 65. - 65 is optional, serves to get the first ("A") character as int 0. Feb 19 '21 at 18:17
3

Converting string into array(stream) of UTF-8:

const str_to_arr_of_UTF8 = new TextEncoder().encode("Adfgdfs");
// [65, 100, 102, 103, 100, 102, 115]

Note: ASCII is a subset of UTF-8, so this is a universal solution

2

For supporting all UTF-16 (also non-BMP/supplementary characters) from ES6 the string.codePointAt() method is available;

This method is an improved version of charCodeAt which could support only unicode codepoints < 65536 ( 216 - a single 16bit ) .

1
2

You can enter a character and get Ascii Code Using this Code

For Example Enter a Character Like A You Get Ascii Code 65

function myFunction(){
    var str=document.getElementById("id1");
    if (str.value=="") {
       str.focus();
       return;
    }
    var a="ASCII Code is == >  ";
document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML =a+str.value.charCodeAt(0);
}
<p>Check ASCII code</p>

<p>
  Enter any character:  
  <input type="text" id="id1" name="text1" maxLength="1">	</br>
</p>

<button onclick="myFunction()">Get ASCII code</button>

<p id="demo" style="color:red;"></p>

2
str.charCodeAt(index)

Using charCodeAt() The following example returns 65, the Unicode value for A.

'ABC'.charCodeAt(0) // returns 65

1

Expanding on the comments by Álvaro González and others, charCodeAt or codePointAt are mighty fine if you are working with the 128 original ASCII characters only (codes 0 to 127). Outside of this range, the code is dependent on the character set, and you need a charset conversion before calculating it if you want the result to make sense.

Let's take the Euro sign as an example: '€'.codePointAt(0) returns 8364, which is well outside the 0-127 range and is relative to the UTF-16 (or UTF-8) charset.

I was porting a Visual Basic program, and noticed that it made use of the Asc function to get the character code. Obviously from its point of view, it would return the character code in the Windows-1252 character set. To be sure to obtain the same number, I need to convert the string charset and then calculate the code.

Pretty straightforward e.g. in Python: ord('€'.encode('Windows-1252')).
To achieve the same in Javascript, however, I had to resort to buffers and a conversion library:

iconv = require('iconv-lite');
buf = iconv.encode("€", 'win1252');
buf.forEach(console.log);
1

charCodeAt(0);

Above code works in most cases, however there is a catch when working with words to find a ranking based on above code. For example, aa would give a ranking of 97+97 = 194 (actual would be 1+1 = 2) whereas w would give 119 (actual would be 23) which makes aa > w. To fix this subtract 96 from above result, to start he positioning from 1.

charCodeAt(0) - 96;

1
  • What about alphabetically first and later? I would recommend against using the sum of character codes for ranking and instead compare each character directly.
    – anderium
    Dec 30 '21 at 14:58
0

For those who want to get a sum of all the ASCII codes for a string with average value:

const ASCIIAverage = (str) =>Math.floor(str.split('').map(item => item.charCodeAt(0)).reduce((prev,next) => prev+next)/str.length)

console.log(ASCIIAverage('Hello World!'))

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