How can I convert a character to its ASCII code using JavaScript?

For example:

get 10 from "\n".

  • Please note that the String.prototype.charCodeAt() method suggested in most answers will return the UTF-16 code unit (not even the full proper UTF-16 encoding due to historical reasons). Only the first 128 Unicode code points are a direct match of the ASCII character encoding. – Álvaro González Jan 16 at 13:15
up vote 1186 down vote accepted
"\n".charCodeAt(0);
  • 535
    The opposite of this is String.fromCharCode(10). – Török Gábor May 1 '11 at 9:38
  • 150
    Fun fact: you don’t really need the 0 (first argument value) — just "\n".charCodeAt() will do. – Mathias Bynens Oct 17 '11 at 9:40
  • 37
    @MathiasBynens: and fortunately this is documented: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/…. "if it is not a number, it defaults to 0" – tokland Nov 15 '11 at 19:46
  • 7
    You should point out that unlike String.fromCharCode( asciiNumVal ), stringInstance.charCodeAt( index ) is not a static method of class String – bobobobo Sep 12 '12 at 19:09
  • 24
    @Mathias Bynens, It certainly does default to zero but I just ran a just out of interest test on performance and it performs **relatively badly compared using 0. jsperf.com/default-to-0-vs-0/4 ** Its a relative difference only, either way its very very quick. – wade montague May 9 '13 at 12:35

String.prototype.charCodeAt() can convert string characters to ASCII numbers. For example:

"ABC".charCodeAt(0) // returns 65

For opposite use String.fromCharCode(10) that convert numbers to equal ASCII character. This function can accept multiple numbers and join all the characters then return the string. Example:

String.fromCharCode(65,66,67); // returns 'ABC'

Here is a quick ASCII characters reference:

{
"31": "",      "32": " ",     "33": "!",     "34": "\"",    "35": "#",    
"36": "$",     "37": "%",     "38": "&",     "39": "'",     "40": "(",    
"41": ")",     "42": "*",     "43": "+",     "44": ",",     "45": "-",    
"46": ".",     "47": "/",     "48": "0",     "49": "1",     "50": "2",    
"51": "3",     "52": "4",     "53": "5",     "54": "6",     "55": "7",    
"56": "8",     "57": "9",     "58": ":",     "59": ";",     "60": "<",    
"61": "=",     "62": ">",     "63": "?",     "64": "@",     "65": "A",    
"66": "B",     "67": "C",     "68": "D",     "69": "E",     "70": "F",    
"71": "G",     "72": "H",     "73": "I",     "74": "J",     "75": "K",    
"76": "L",     "77": "M",     "78": "N",     "79": "O",     "80": "P",    
"81": "Q",     "82": "R",     "83": "S",     "84": "T",     "85": "U",    
"86": "V",     "87": "W",     "88": "X",     "89": "Y",     "90": "Z",    
"91": "[",     "92": "\\",    "93": "]",     "94": "^",     "95": "_",    
"96": "`",     "97": "a",     "98": "b",     "99": "c",     "100": "d",    
"101": "e",    "102": "f",    "103": "g",    "104": "h",    "105": "i",    
"106": "j",    "107": "k",    "108": "l",    "109": "m",    "110": "n",    
"111": "o",    "112": "p",    "113": "q",    "114": "r",    "115": "s",    
"116": "t",    "117": "u",    "118": "v",    "119": "w",    "120": "x",    
"121": "y",    "122": "z",    "123": "{",    "124": "|",    "125": "}",    
"126": "~",    "127": ""
}
  • 26
    Better ascii reference: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII - I'm pretty proud the coloring I did for the tables on that page remains there after almost 10 years : ) – B T Apr 25 '14 at 19:00
  • 10
    Better yet, man ascii – theGrayFox Jul 27 '14 at 7:12
  • 6
    @theGrayFox C:\> man ascii gives Bad command or file name – Ring Ø Jun 12 '15 at 6:53
  • 4
    @ring0 I'm pretty sure Windows don't have manpages? – Daniel Cheung Sep 5 '15 at 14:01

If you have only one char and not a string, you can use:

'\n'.charCodeAt();

omitting the 0...

It is slower though. With the current version of chrome, it is 5 times slower.

  • 9
    This actually takes longer. It's faster to just use the zero. (On my computer, it took ~twice as long—0.055s vs. 0.126s through a few ten thousand iterations) – royhowie Nov 27 '14 at 0:09

While the other answers are right, I prefer this way:

function ascii (a) { return a.charCodeAt(0); }

Then, to use it, simply:

var lineBreak = ascii("\n");

I am using this for a small shortcut system:

$(window).keypress(function(event) {
  if (event.ctrlKey && event.which == ascii("s")) {
    savecontent();
    }
  // ...
  });

And you can even use it inside map() or other methods:

var ints = 'ergtrer'.split('').map(ascii);
  • Just for the beauty a new ES6 way to write it: const ascii = a => a.charCodeAt(0); – axkibe Nov 29 '17 at 9:10

For those that want to get a sum of all the ASCII codes for a string:

'Foobar'
  .split('')
  .map(function (char) {
    return char.charCodeAt(0);
  })
  .reduce(function (current, previous) {
    return previous + current;
  });

Or, ES6:

[...'Foobar']
  .map(char => char.charCodeAt(0))
  .reduce((current, previous) => previous + current)
  • Double-check your last line. – Ypnypn Oct 14 '15 at 21:43
  • 5
    [...'Foobar'] for extra ES6 ninja points :) – Emissary Jan 30 '16 at 18:59
  • 1
    @Emissary when three people call you drunk, you lie down and start rolling. Extra ES6 points for me! Thank you :) – Filip Dupanović Mar 8 '16 at 18:01
  • Elegant! as a function: function ascii(str) { return str .split('') .map(function (char) { return char + ": " + String(char.charCodeAt(0)) + "\n"; }) .reduce(function (current, previous) { return current + previous; }); } – D-Money Dec 1 '16 at 19:47
  • [...'Foobar'].reduce((i,s)=>s.charCodeAt(0)+i,0) – Nick Dec 5 '16 at 14:48

JavaScript stores strings as UTF-16 (double byte) so if you want to ignore the second byte just strip it out with a bitwise & operator on 0000000011111111 (ie 255):

'a'.charCodeAt(0) & 255 === 97; // because 'a' = 97 0 
'b'.charCodeAt(0) & 255 === 98; // because 'b' = 98 0 
'✓'.charCodeAt(0) & 255 === 19; // because '✓' = 19 39
  • why would you want to ignore the second byte? – Roberg Mar 13 '17 at 10:19
  • 1
    Question is asking about producing ASCII from a UTF-16 string (double byte). Sooner or later you will get non-ascii codes if you fail to ignore the second byte. – Steven de Salas Mar 13 '17 at 11:24

For supporting all UTF-16 (also non-BMP/supplementary characters) from ES6 the string.codePointAt() method is available;

This method is an improved version of charCodeAt which could support only unicode codepoints < 65536 ( 216 - a single 16bit ) .

**Runtime you van enter a Character any get Ascii Code Using this Code** 
**Its Working**

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>

<p >Check ASCII code </p>

<button onclick="myFunction()">Click me</button>
<p>
  Enter any value:  
  <input type="text" id="id1" name="text1"> </br>
</p>

<p id="demo" style="color:red;"></p>

<script>
function myFunction(){
    var str=document.getElementById("id1");
    var a="ASCII Code is == >  ";
document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML =a+str.value.charCodeAt(0);
}
</script>



</body>
</html>

For Example Enter a Character Like A You Get Ascii Code 65

protected by Pankaj Parkar Sep 23 '15 at 19:08

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