1060

How can I convert a character to its ASCII code using JavaScript?

For example:

get 10 from "\n".

1
  • 17
    Please note that the String.prototype.charCodeAt() method suggested in most answers will return the UTF-16 code unit (not even the full proper UTF-16 encoding due to historical reasons). Only the first 128 Unicode code points are a direct match of the ASCII character encoding. – Álvaro González Jan 16 '18 at 13:15

11 Answers 11

1608
"\n".charCodeAt(0);
14
  • 720
    The opposite of this is String.fromCharCode(10). – viam0Zah May 1 '11 at 9:38
  • 201
    Fun fact: you don’t really need the 0 (first argument value) — just "\n".charCodeAt() will do. – Mathias Bynens Oct 17 '11 at 9:40
  • 50
    @MathiasBynens: and fortunately this is documented: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/…. "if it is not a number, it defaults to 0" – tokland Nov 15 '11 at 19:46
  • 12
    You should point out that unlike String.fromCharCode( asciiNumVal ), stringInstance.charCodeAt( index ) is not a static method of class String – bobobobo Sep 12 '12 at 19:09
  • 27
    @Mathias Bynens, It certainly does default to zero but I just ran a just out of interest test on performance and it performs **relatively badly compared using 0. jsperf.com/default-to-0-vs-0/4 ** Its a relative difference only, either way its very very quick. – wade montague May 9 '13 at 12:35
427

String.prototype.charCodeAt() can convert string characters to ASCII numbers. For example:

"ABC".charCodeAt(0) // returns 65

For opposite use String.fromCharCode(10) that convert numbers to equal ASCII character. This function can accept multiple numbers and join all the characters then return the string. Example:

String.fromCharCode(65,66,67); // returns 'ABC'

Here is a quick ASCII characters reference:

{
"31": "",      "32": " ",     "33": "!",     "34": "\"",    "35": "#",    
"36": "$",     "37": "%",     "38": "&",     "39": "'",     "40": "(",    
"41": ")",     "42": "*",     "43": "+",     "44": ",",     "45": "-",    
"46": ".",     "47": "/",     "48": "0",     "49": "1",     "50": "2",    
"51": "3",     "52": "4",     "53": "5",     "54": "6",     "55": "7",    
"56": "8",     "57": "9",     "58": ":",     "59": ";",     "60": "<",    
"61": "=",     "62": ">",     "63": "?",     "64": "@",     "65": "A",    
"66": "B",     "67": "C",     "68": "D",     "69": "E",     "70": "F",    
"71": "G",     "72": "H",     "73": "I",     "74": "J",     "75": "K",    
"76": "L",     "77": "M",     "78": "N",     "79": "O",     "80": "P",    
"81": "Q",     "82": "R",     "83": "S",     "84": "T",     "85": "U",    
"86": "V",     "87": "W",     "88": "X",     "89": "Y",     "90": "Z",    
"91": "[",     "92": "\\",    "93": "]",     "94": "^",     "95": "_",    
"96": "`",     "97": "a",     "98": "b",     "99": "c",     "100": "d",    
"101": "e",    "102": "f",    "103": "g",    "104": "h",    "105": "i",    
"106": "j",    "107": "k",    "108": "l",    "109": "m",    "110": "n",    
"111": "o",    "112": "p",    "113": "q",    "114": "r",    "115": "s",    
"116": "t",    "117": "u",    "118": "v",    "119": "w",    "120": "x",    
"121": "y",    "122": "z",    "123": "{",    "124": "|",    "125": "}",    
"126": "~",    "127": ""
}
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  • 35
    Better ascii reference: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII - I'm pretty proud the coloring I did for the tables on that page remains there after almost 10 years : ) – B T Apr 25 '14 at 19:00
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    @theGrayFox C:\> man ascii gives Bad command or file name – Breaking not so bad Jun 12 '15 at 6:53
  • Note that these methods are UTF-16 compatible, meaning depending on the input string, charCodeAt can extend far past 1 byte ASCII values 0-127. Don't assume it is in that range if arbitrary string input is being accepted and handled by javascript. – theferrit32 Aug 20 '19 at 21:11
  • @e2-e4 dear Developer your on the wrong OS. man is a linux command. Not sure of the windows equivalent. Probably safer using a search engine on a browser to search for 'man ascii' on windows, one result -> man7.org/linux/man-pages/man7/ascii.7.html – tgkprog Mar 24 at 15:46
41

If you have only one char and not a string, you can use:

'\n'.charCodeAt();

omitting the 0...

It used to be significantly slower than 'n'.charCodeAt(0), but I've tested it now and I do not see any difference anymore (executed 10 billions times with and without the 0). Tested for performance only in Chrome and Firefox.

1
  • 11
    This actually takes longer. It's faster to just use the zero. (On my computer, it took ~twice as long—0.055s vs. 0.126s through a few ten thousand iterations) – royhowie Nov 27 '14 at 0:09
31

While the other answers are right, I prefer this way:

function ascii (a) { return a.charCodeAt(0); }

Then, to use it, simply:

var lineBreak = ascii("\n");

I am using this for a small shortcut system:

$(window).keypress(function(event) {
  if (event.ctrlKey && event.which == ascii("s")) {
    savecontent();
    }
  // ...
  });

And you can even use it inside map() or other methods:

var ints = 'ergtrer'.split('').map(ascii);
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  • 1
    Just for the beauty a new ES6 way to write it: const ascii = a => a.charCodeAt(0); – axkibe Nov 29 '17 at 9:10
23

For those that want to get a sum of all the ASCII codes for a string:

'Foobar'
  .split('')
  .map(x=>x.charCodeAt(0))
  .reduce((a,b)=>a+b);

Or, ES6:

[...'Foobar']
  .map(char => char.charCodeAt(0))
  .reduce((current, previous) => previous + current)
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  • 1
    Double-check your last line. – Ypnypn Oct 14 '15 at 21:43
  • Elegant! as a function: function ascii(str) { return str .split('') .map(function (char) { return char + ": " + String(char.charCodeAt(0)) + "\n"; }) .reduce(function (current, previous) { return current + previous; }); } – Darren Griffith Dec 1 '16 at 19:47
  • 2
    [...'Foobar'].reduce((i,s)=>s.charCodeAt(0)+i,0) – Nick Dec 5 '16 at 14:48
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    Nobody asked for the sum of all ASCII codes in a string, and are unlikely to ever do so. – Carl Smith Sep 12 '19 at 9:25
  • and for those who want a moccacino, there is Starbucks – Marco Altieri May 17 at 10:51
10

To ensure full Unicode support and reversibility, consider using:

'\n'.codePointAt(0);

This will ensure that when testing characters over the UTF-16 limit, you will get their true code point value.

e.g.

'𐩕'.codePointAt(0); // 68181
String.fromCodePoint(68181); // '𐩕'

'𐩕'.charCodeAt(0);  // 55298
String.fromCharCode(55298);  // '�'
1
  • It might also be useful to convert the special character to hex notation, since some text editors might not work properly having to deal directly with such characters. EG: alert(str.hexEncode().hexDecode()); – Jose Tepedino Nov 11 '19 at 2:55
9

JavaScript stores strings as UTF-16 (double byte) so if you want to ignore the second byte just strip it out with a bitwise & operator on 0000000011111111 (ie 255):

'a'.charCodeAt(0) & 255 === 97; // because 'a' = 97 0 
'b'.charCodeAt(0) & 255 === 98; // because 'b' = 98 0 
'✓'.charCodeAt(0) & 255 === 19; // because '✓' = 19 39
4
  • why would you want to ignore the second byte? – Roberg Mar 13 '17 at 10:19
  • 3
    Question is asking about producing ASCII from a UTF-16 string (double byte). Sooner or later you will get non-ascii codes if you fail to ignore the second byte. – Steven de Salas Mar 13 '17 at 11:24
  • 2
    @Steven de Salas - Your 'solution' to getting non-ASCII codes for non-ASCII characters is to return the wrong ASCII code?? – Carl Smith Sep 12 '19 at 9:21
  • @CarlSmith, not the wrong one. Just to strip out the non-ascii component of the character. If you are working with single bytes this is useful. Your project might need a different solution though. – Steven de Salas Sep 14 '19 at 6:22
3

You can enter a character and get Ascii Code Using this Code

For Example Enter a Character Like A You Get Ascii Code 65

function myFunction(){
    var str=document.getElementById("id1");
    if (str.value=="") {
       str.focus();
       return;
    }
    var a="ASCII Code is == >  ";
document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML =a+str.value.charCodeAt(0);
}
<p>Check ASCII code</p>

<p>
  Enter any character:  
  <input type="text" id="id1" name="text1" maxLength="1">	</br>
</p>

<button onclick="myFunction()">Get ASCII code</button>

<p id="demo" style="color:red;"></p>

3

To convert a String to a cumulative number:

const stringToSum = str => [...str||"A"].reduce((a, x) => a += x.codePointAt(0), 0);

console.log(stringToSum("A"));              // 65
console.log(stringToSum("Roko"));           // 411
console.log(stringToSum("Stack Overflow")); // 1386

Use case:

Say you want to generate different background colors depending on a username:

const stringToSum = str => [...str||"A"].reduce((a, x) => a += x.codePointAt(0), 0);

const UI_userIcon = user => {
  const hue = (stringToSum(user.name) - 65) % 360; // "A" = hue: 0
  console.log(`Hue: ${hue}`);
  return `<div class="UserIcon" style="background:hsl(${hue}, 80%, 60%)" title="${user.name}">
    <span class="UserIcon-letter">${user.name[0].toUpperCase()}</span>
  </div>`;
};

[
  {name:"A"},
  {name:"Amanda"},
  {name:"amanda"},
  {name:"Anna"},
].forEach(user => {
  document.body.insertAdjacentHTML("beforeend", UI_userIcon(user));
});
.UserIcon {
  width: 4em;
  height: 4em;
  border-radius: 4em;
  display: inline-flex;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
}

.UserIcon-letter {
  font: 700 2em/0 sans-serif;
  color: #fff;
}

2
  • Why the number "65"? What does that represent? – Reality Feb 19 at 16:58
  • -65 is totally optional. Since ASCII "A" character numeric = 65. - 65 is optional, serves to get the first ("A") character as int 0. – Roko C. Buljan Feb 19 at 18:17
2

For supporting all UTF-16 (also non-BMP/supplementary characters) from ES6 the string.codePointAt() method is available;

This method is an improved version of charCodeAt which could support only unicode codepoints < 65536 ( 216 - a single 16bit ) .

1
1
str.charCodeAt(index)

Using charCodeAt() The following example returns 65, the Unicode value for A.

'ABC'.charCodeAt(0) // returns 65

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