61

I need to get the product version and file version for a DLL or EXE file using Win32 native APIs in C or C++. I'm not looking for the Windows version, but the version numbers that you see by right-clicking on a DLL file, selecting "Properties", then looking at the "Details" tab. This is usually a four-part dotted version number x.x.x.x.

  • Which language are you using? – overslacked Jun 2 '09 at 17:12
  • GetFileVersionInfo() – Matt Schmidt Jun 2 '09 at 17:13
  • 7
    Doesn't matter if he just wants Win32 API calls. Any language that supports calling system DLLs should be fine. – crashmstr Jun 2 '09 at 17:15
  • Edited to clarify that this is about C/C++. – JSBձոգչ Jun 2 '09 at 17:27
94

You would use the GetFileVersionInfo API.

See Using Version Information on the MSDN site.

Sample:

DWORD  verHandle = 0;
UINT   size      = 0;
LPBYTE lpBuffer  = NULL;
DWORD  verSize   = GetFileVersionInfoSize( szVersionFile, &verHandle);

if (verSize != NULL)
{
    LPSTR verData = new char[verSize];

    if (GetFileVersionInfo( szVersionFile, verHandle, verSize, verData))
    {
        if (VerQueryValue(verData,"\\",(VOID FAR* FAR*)&lpBuffer,&size))
        {
            if (size)
            {
                VS_FIXEDFILEINFO *verInfo = (VS_FIXEDFILEINFO *)lpBuffer;
                if (verInfo->dwSignature == 0xfeef04bd)
                {

                    // Doesn't matter if you are on 32 bit or 64 bit,
                    // DWORD is always 32 bits, so first two revision numbers
                    // come from dwFileVersionMS, last two come from dwFileVersionLS
                    TRACE( "File Version: %d.%d.%d.%d\n",
                    ( verInfo->dwFileVersionMS >> 16 ) & 0xffff,
                    ( verInfo->dwFileVersionMS >>  0 ) & 0xffff,
                    ( verInfo->dwFileVersionLS >> 16 ) & 0xffff,
                    ( verInfo->dwFileVersionLS >>  0 ) & 0xffff
                    );
                }
            }
        }
    }
    delete[] verData;
}
  • 1
    int revision = HIWORD(verInfo->dwProductVersionLS); int build = LOWORD(verInfo->dwProductVersionLS); – Igor Jerosimić Dec 2 '13 at 23:49
  • 6
    I know it has been a while, but for newbies like me this is how you get the .exe filename: TCHAR szVersionFile[MAX_PATH]; GetModuleFileName(NULL, szVersionFile, MAX_PATH ); – BurninatorDor Sep 5 '14 at 18:36
  • 1
    @BurninatorDor Don't call yourself a newbie. I've been programming in MFC for 6 years thus far, and this helped me. – Neil Sep 11 '14 at 9:33
  • 2
    edited this answer because it was calculating the version numbers wrong. From the MSDN docs for dwProductVersionMS: "The most significant 32 bits of the file's binary version number. This member is used with dwFileVersionLS to form a 64-bit value used for numeric comparisons." , so you use both of them to calculate the version number. First two (major / minor) are in versionMS and last two (revision / build) are in versionLS. It doesn't matter if you are in 32/64 bit, DWORD is always 32 bits. – mgrandi Nov 12 '14 at 0:28
  • Make sure to link to libversion.a for MingW. See here for copy-pastable example: pastebin.com/sYZCVpfw – Aralox Sep 26 '15 at 2:50
19

All these solutions did not work properly (with my system). I found out that each of the four parts of the version number are saved as a 16-bit value.

The first two numbers are saved in the 32-bit DWORD dwFileVersionMS, and the second two in dwFileVersionLS. So I edited your code at the output section like this:

    TRACE( "File Version: %d.%d.%d.%d\n",
        ( pFileInfo->dwFileVersionMS >> 16 ) & 0xffff,
        ( pFileInfo->dwFileVersionMS >>  0 ) & 0xffff,
        ( pFileInfo->dwFileVersionLS >> 16 ) & 0xffff,
        ( pFileInfo->dwFileVersionLS >>  0 ) & 0xffff
        );

And it works perfectly. The output is formatted like on my system:

major.minor.build.revision

18

You get this information using the version information APIs. Here is a sample:

void PrintFileVersion( TCHAR *pszFilePath )
{
    DWORD               dwSize              = 0;
    BYTE                *pbVersionInfo      = NULL;
    VS_FIXEDFILEINFO    *pFileInfo          = NULL;
    UINT                puLenFileInfo       = 0;

    // Get the version information for the file requested
    dwSize = GetFileVersionInfoSize( pszFilePath, NULL );
    if ( dwSize == 0 )
    {
        printf( "Error in GetFileVersionInfoSize: %d\n", GetLastError() );
        return;
    }

    pbVersionInfo = new BYTE[ dwSize ];

    if ( !GetFileVersionInfo( pszFilePath, 0, dwSize, pbVersionInfo ) )
    {
        printf( "Error in GetFileVersionInfo: %d\n", GetLastError() );
        delete[] pbVersionInfo;
        return;
    }

    if ( !VerQueryValue( pbVersionInfo, TEXT("\\"), (LPVOID*) &pFileInfo, &puLenFileInfo ) )
    {
        printf( "Error in VerQueryValue: %d\n", GetLastError() );
        delete[] pbVersionInfo;
        return;
    }

    // pFileInfo->dwFileVersionMS is usually zero. However, you should check
    // this if your version numbers seem to be wrong

    printf( "File Version: %d.%d.%d.%d\n",
        ( pFileInfo->dwFileVersionLS >> 24 ) & 0xff,
        ( pFileInfo->dwFileVersionLS >> 16 ) & 0xff,
        ( pFileInfo->dwFileVersionLS >>  8 ) & 0xff,
        ( pFileInfo->dwFileVersionLS >>  0 ) & 0xff
        );

    // pFileInfo->dwProductVersionMS is usually zero. However, you should check
    // this if your version numbers seem to be wrong.

    printf( "Product Version: %d.%d.%d.%d\n",
        ( pFileInfo->dwProductVersionLS >> 24 ) & 0xff,
        ( pFileInfo->dwProductVersionLS >> 16 ) & 0xff,
        ( pFileInfo->dwProductVersionLS >>  8 ) & 0xff,
        ( pFileInfo->dwProductVersionLS >>  0 ) & 0xff
        );
}
  • 2
    I think this is wrong. for file version 1.0.0.1 this function gives me "0.0.0.1". I ended up @Vasya 's answer – liorda Mar 18 '13 at 10:20
9

This code shows the file version numbers correctly.

( pFileInfo->dwFileVersionMS >> 16 ) & 0xff,
( pFileInfo->dwFileVersionMS >> 0 ) & 0xff,
( pFileInfo->dwFileVersionLS >>  16 ) & 0xff,
( pFileInfo->dwFileVersionLS >>  0 ) & 0xff);
  • 4
    Can you provide some context to this answer? It seems to be incomplete. If it was a correction to another answer, please leave a comment on it, or edit that answer and it will be approved by a more experianced user. – Deanna Oct 16 '12 at 8:00
  • this will definitely not work correctly, if the version includes any component greater than 255, e.g. 6.1.3709.2 The four components are 16-bit numbers, not 8-bit. – Spike0xff Nov 23 '16 at 2:39
6

Found these articles...sorry, but I don't have direct experience with how to do this using native APIs, so I deferred to an Internet search:

Hope these help!

4

The easiest way is to use the GetFileVersionInfoEx or GetFileVersionInfo API functions.

You can also do it from within your application resources as explained here.

1

Since none of the answers mention it... I found out that you have to make different calculations depending on if you're running on 32- or 64-bit systems. That's why you find that certain answers in this question work for you, and others do not.

Here's a sample implementation I use:

if(IsWow64())
{
        // 64 bit build
        major =     (verInfo->dwProductVersionMS >> 16) & 0xffff;
        minor =     (verInfo->dwProductVersionMS >>  0) & 0xffff;
        revision =  (verInfo->dwProductVersionLS >> 16) & 0xffff;
        build =     (verInfo->dwProductVersionLS >>  0) & 0xffff;
} 
else
{
        // 32 bit build
        major =     HIWORD(verInfo->dwProductVersionMS);
        minor =     LOWORD(verInfo->dwProductVersionMS);
        revision =  HIWORD(verInfo->dwProductVersionLS);
        build =     LOWORD(verInfo->dwProductVersionLS);
}

And the implementation of IsWow64 (not mine):

typedef BOOL (WINAPI *LPFN_ISWOW64PROCESS) (HANDLE, PBOOL);
LPFN_ISWOW64PROCESS fnIsWow64Process;

BOOL IsWow64()
{
    BOOL bIsWow64 = FALSE;

    //IsWow64Process is not available on all supported versions of Windows.
    //Use GetModuleHandle to get a handle to the DLL that contains the function
    //and GetProcAddress to get a pointer to the function if available.

    fnIsWow64Process = (LPFN_ISWOW64PROCESS) GetProcAddress(
        GetModuleHandle(TEXT("kernel32")),"IsWow64Process");

    if(NULL != fnIsWow64Process)
    {
        if (!fnIsWow64Process(GetCurrentProcess(),&bIsWow64))
        {
            // Handle error...
        }
    }
    return bIsWow64;
}
  • Can you provide a case where those two conditions differ? All the values are fixed length DWORDs which can be split into two WORDs. Your 64-bit conditions also seems to truncate each value to 255 rather than 32767. – Deanna Mar 18 '13 at 14:13
  • Your code is wrong. Making an AND with 0xFF cripples the version number. Some applications have a version number of for example "2.32.1.1300". Your code would give wrong results. Correct is AND with 0xFFFF which would results in the same as using LOWORD / HIWORD. This posting should be downvoted, because it is definitely wrong. – Elmue Mar 7 '16 at 14:19
  • Or you could suggest the edit, @Elmue -- if you click edit on the post, you should have the ability to create proposed changes which moderators will then approve/deny. – kayleeFrye_onDeck Oct 25 '16 at 1:21
  • @Elmue it's updated now – kayleeFrye_onDeck Oct 25 '16 at 5:52
  • 2
    Why do you need different calculations for 32bit and 64bit? The version/product numbers are fixed 32bit DWORD values on both 32bit and 64bit builds. On a 64bit build, the HIWORD() and LOWORD() macros will zero-extend the DWORDs to 64bit DWORD_PTR before bit-shifting them, but the end result will be the same values. Besides, IsWow64() does not detect a 64bit build anyway. IsWow64Process() returns TRUE only for a 32bit build that is running inside of WOW64, so it is still a 32bit build. To differentiate between 32bit and 64bit builds, you need to use #if(n)def _WIN64 instead. – Remy Lebeau Nov 16 '16 at 2:46

protected by Roman R. Mar 12 '15 at 18:48

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