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I've seen this in some demo code:

@property (readonly) SomeObject* someInstance;

What was lacking to my eye is any mention of either assign, copy or retain; if omitted, what type of pointer is it? Obviously it is a pointer of some kind, but I'd think in the absence of retain or copy all pointers would simply be assign since they simply point to and equal whatever someInstance is.

But I don't want to make such assumptions. Properties seem deceptively simple to understand, when actually the concept can be a bit difficult to wrap you head around, I find.

3

The other values (retain, copy, assign) only matter when you have a setter involved. Any getter generated with any of those attributes will be the same. The retain, copy, or assign only really apply when you are setting values because you are changing the behavior of what the setter will do with the object passed in. Since this property is readonly, it means you are only creating a getter to return the pointer of the object, it doesn't matter what anything else is because you can't set it anyway.

  • none of the @property declarations matter at all if you simply call someInstance without dot notation, right? Because then you could set it or do anything you want, right? Only if you use the dot notation will you be unable to set it, correct? – johnbakers Feb 23 '12 at 4:49
  • Correct, if you just call the instance variable directly in your code without invoking the setter/getter through dot syntax or square brackets, properties don't apply. – Lucas Derraugh Feb 23 '12 at 4:52
  • I should add unless you are using ARC, then strong and weak do matter, but that's a different story. – Lucas Derraugh Feb 23 '12 at 4:54
1
**readonly**
Indicates that the property is read-only.
If you specify readonly, only a getter method is required in the @implementation block. If you use the @synthesize directive in the implementation block, only the getter method is synthesized. Moreover, if you attempt to assign a value using the dot syntax, you get a compiler error.

**assign**
Specifies that the setter uses simple assignment. This attribute is the default.
You use this attribute for scalar types such as NSInteger and CGRect.

readonly is one of the Writability. There are 2, readwrite (default) and readonly.

assign is one of the Setter Semantics. like retain/copy etc.

Apple Documentation

1

If you are not using ARC, the assign, retain, and copy attributes only affect the compiler-generated setter method of the property. Since the compiler doesn't generate a setter method for a readonly property, you don't need to specify any of these attributes.

It can be useful to specify one of them anyway, if you provide some other method by which the user can set the property, to document your ownership (or not) of the property value.

If you are using ARC and @synthesize, the ownership of the property must match the ownership of the instance variable. If you let the compiler generate the instance variable, it will automatically apply the ownership attribute of the property to the instance variable.

  • none of the @property declarations matter at all if you simply call someInstance without dot notation, right? Because then you could set it or do anything you want, right? Only if you use the dot notation will you be unable to set it, correct? – johnbakers Feb 23 '12 at 4:50
  • If you're not using ARC, and you access the instance variable directly, none of them matter. If you're using ARC, the declared ownership must match the ownership of the instance variable. If you are using ARC and you let @synthesize create the instance variable, it will automatically copy the ownership qualification from the property declaration to the instance variable. – rob mayoff Feb 23 '12 at 4:53
  • I have modified my answer to discuss ARC vs. non-ARC. – rob mayoff Feb 23 '12 at 4:56
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should read this https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/ObjectiveC/Chapters/ocProperties.html

assign Specifies that the setter uses simple assignment. This attribute is the default.

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