25

I like to have a typical "usage:" line in my cmd.exe scripts — if a parameter is missing, user is given simple reminder of how the script is to be used.

The problem is that I can't safely predict whether potential user would use GUI or CLI. If somebody using GUI double-clicks this script in Explorer window, they won't have chance to read anything, unless I pause the window. If they use CLI, pause will bother them.

So I'm looking for a way to detect it.

@echo off
if _%1_==__ (
    echo usage: %nx0: filename
    rem now pause or not to pause?
)

Is there a nice solution on this?

0

9 Answers 9

21

You can check the value of %CMDCMDLINE% variable. It contains the command that was used to launch cmd.exe.

I prepared a test .bat file:

@Echo Off
echo %CMDCMDLINE%
pause

When run from inside of open cmd.exe window, the script prints "C:\Windows\system32\cmd.exe". When run by double-clicking, it prints cmd /c ""C:\Users\mbu\Desktop\test.bat" "

So to check if your script was launched by double-clicking you need to check if %cmdcmdline% contains the path to your script. The final solution would look like this:

@echo off

set interactive=1
echo %cmdcmdline% | find /i "%~0" >nul
if not errorlevel 1 set interactive=0

rem now I can use %interactive% anywhere

if _%1_==__ (
    echo usage: %~nx0 filename
    if _%interactive%_==_0_ pause
)

Edit: implemented fixes for issues changes discussed in comments; edited example to demonstrate them

9
  • Strange enough: if you open new cmd.exe session and call this, the first time it pauses: it seems that find does not raise %errorlevel% in the first attempt. Next and other attempts are fine. Feb 24, 2012 at 15:34
  • The raising of %errorlevel% also fails if other commands (typical couple of sets and a cd in my case) are present before this construct. Feb 24, 2012 at 15:36
  • Plus, this won't work in a subroutine called using call :somesub. In that case %cmdcmdline% will contain only label of that subroutine: %cmdcmdline%. Feb 24, 2012 at 15:39
  • 1
    Try changing if %errorlevel%==0 to if not errorlevel 1. It seems it gives more reliable results, for me it does not pause in a fresh opened cmd.exe window. Another thing worth trying is executing this at the beginning of the script and storing result in a variable.
    – MBu
    Feb 24, 2012 at 16:58
  • 1
    yes, implementing both your tips seems to solve both issues: now after the find, I just if not errorlevel 1 set interactive=0 (no need to have it as first command) and then I can use %interactive% wherever I need to, including any number of routines. can I accept twice? .-) Feb 28, 2012 at 10:36
5
:: exit if not interactive
echo %CMDCMDLINE% | find /i "/c"
if not ERRORLEVEL 1 goto:eof
1
  • could you elaborate more on how this differs from the accepted answer? Jul 20, 2016 at 13:00
1

Here, I wrote something...

Usage.bat


@echo off
if arg%1==arg goto help
goto action

:action
echo do something...
goto end

:help
set help1=This is Help line 1.
set help2=This is Help line 2.
cmd.exe /k "echo %help1% &echo %help2%"
goto end

:end

It's not perfect, but it works! :D

-joedf

1

This is only using the internal command. so effectively....

EnableDelayedExpansion

if "!cmdcmdline!" neq "!cmdcmdline:%~f0=!" pause >nul

or

if not "!cmdcmdline!" == "!cmdcmdline:%~f0=!" pause >nul

DisableDelayedExpansion

if "%cmdcmdline%" neq "%cmdcmdline:%~f0=%" pause >nul

or

if not "%cmdcmdline%" == "%cmdcmdline:%~f0=%" pause >nul
1

Start your batch checking for %WINDIR% in %cmdcmdline% like this:

echo "%cmdcmdline%" | findstr /ic:"%windir%" >nul && (
  echo Interactive run of: %0 is not allowed
  pause
  exit /B 1
)
0

Please use findstr

echo %cmdcmdline% | findstr /ic:"%~f0" >nul && ( pause >nul )

or

setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
.
.
echo !cmdcmdline! | findstr /ic:"%~f0" >nul && ( pause >nul )
.
.
endlocal

This is always worked...

2
  • Well, findstr is an external program, so it's not really "from within", but yes, a viable option. Jan 28, 2015 at 18:32
  • find.exe findstr.exe - these are windows internal exe. that is similar with internal command.
    – kygg
    Jan 31, 2015 at 17:52
0

for internal command

setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
set "cmddiff=!cmdcmdline:~0,1!" & if !cmddiff! neq ^" ( pause >nul )
endlocal

or

setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
set "cmddiff=!cmdcmdline:~28,1!" & if !cmddiff! neq ^" ( pause >nul )
endlocal

You can compare the different thing, but this is only worked within EnableDelayedExpansion. and I don't think that this will be always worked, cause windows version, etc...

0

Similar approach...

setlocal

set startedFromExplorer=
echo %cmdcmdline% | find /i "cmd.exe /c """"%~0""" >nul
if not errorlevel 1 set startedFromExplorer=1

...

if defined startedFromExplorer pause
goto :EOF
0
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion

if "!cmdcmdline!" neq "!cmdcmdline:%comspec%=!" ( pause>nul )

Test is done in Windows 10. Using %windir%, it is a little dangerous or ambiguous. So %comspec% is super safe.

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