183

I have two arrays. The first array contains some values while the second array contains indices of the values which should be removed from the first array. For example:

var valuesArr = new Array("v1","v2","v3","v4","v5");   
var removeValFromIndex = new Array(0,2,4);

I want to remove the values present at indices 0,2,4 from valuesArr. I thought the native splice method might help so I came up with:

$.each(removeValFromIndex,function(index,value){
    valuesArr.splice(value,1);
});

But it didn't work because after each splice, the indices of the values in valuesArr were different. I could solve this problem by using a temporary array and copying all values to the second array, but I was wondering if there are any native methods to which we can pass multiple indices at which to remove values from an array.

I would prefer a jQuery solution. (Not sure if I can use grep here)

27 Answers 27

344

There's always the plain old for loop:

var valuesArr = ["v1","v2","v3","v4","v5"],
    removeValFromIndex = [0,2,4];    

for (var i = removeValFromIndex.length -1; i >= 0; i--)
   valuesArr.splice(removeValFromIndex[i],1);

Go through removeValFromIndex in reverse order and you can .splice() without messing up the indexes of the yet-to-be-removed items.

Note in the above I've used the array-literal syntax with square brackets to declare the two arrays. This is the recommended syntax because new Array() use is potentially confusing given that it responds differently depending on how many parameters you pass in.

EDIT: Just saw your comment on another answer about the array of indexes not necessarily being in any particular order. If that's the case just sort it into descending order before you start:

removeValFromIndex.sort(function(a,b){ return b - a; });

And follow that with whatever looping / $.each() / etc. method you like.

12
  • 4
    wont slicing mess up the index Commented Aug 29, 2013 at 15:42
  • 9
    @MuhammadUmer - No, not if you do it correctly, which is what my answer explains.
    – nnnnnn
    Commented Aug 29, 2013 at 19:09
  • 5
    +1, I didn't realized I had to do the splice in reverse order, although instead of using forEach, my approach is using $.each(rvm.reverse(), function(e, i ) {}) Commented Nov 3, 2016 at 15:57
  • 4
    this will only work if removeValFromIndex is in sorted in ascending order Commented Aug 21, 2019 at 5:06
  • 1
    @KunalBurangi - the answer explicitly covers sorting.
    – nnnnnn
    Commented Aug 21, 2019 at 8:14
58

I suggest you use Array.prototype.filter

var valuesArr = ["v1","v2","v3","v4","v5"];
var removeValFrom = [0, 2, 4];
valuesArr = valuesArr.filter(function(value, index) {
     return removeValFrom.indexOf(index) == -1;
})
3
  • 1
    indexOf inside of filter... not optimum Commented Jan 14, 2018 at 0:10
  • 4
    upvote. faster than the splice method according to jsperf.com/remove-multiple/1
    – lionbigcat
    Commented Nov 6, 2019 at 8:07
  • 1
    Yes it's faster than splice but will create a new array, not delete items in place.
    – doc_id
    Commented Jul 14, 2022 at 0:38
37

Here is one that I use when not going with lodash/underscore:

while(IndexesToBeRemoved.length) {
    elements.splice(IndexesToBeRemoved.pop(), 1);
}
6
  • Elegant solution! At first I thought this wouldn't work because I thought that every time you call slice you would have to recalculate the indexes to be removed (-1 on IndexestoBeRemoved), but it actually works! Commented May 27, 2016 at 16:02
  • 3
    Too much clever Commented Nov 1, 2016 at 17:28
  • 23
    This solution is worked if only IndexesToBeRemoved array is sorted by ascending.
    – xfg
    Commented Jan 30, 2017 at 3:55
  • 2
    Those indices will be invalidated after the first splice.
    – shinzou
    Commented Jan 3, 2018 at 18:42
  • @shinzou - Not if IndexesToBeRemoved is sorted (ascending).
    – nnnnnn
    Commented Nov 18, 2018 at 1:06
18

Not in-place but can be done using grep and inArray functions of jQuery.

var arr = $.grep(valuesArr, function(n, i) {
    return $.inArray(i, removeValFromIndex) ==-1;
});

alert(arr);//arr contains V2, V4

check this fiddle.

4
  • It would be (close enough to) in-place if you just said valuesArr = $.grep(...);
    – nnnnnn
    Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 4:13
  • 1
    @nnnnnn ha ha ha I was leaving for a meeting (you know they make you so productive) so did not experiment much. Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 7:43
  • 1
    @cept0 Why the downvote? OP asked for a jQuery solution.
    – Ste77
    Commented Jun 29, 2014 at 15:14
  • jsfiddler - Error 404. We're truly sorry, but there is no such page.
    – Ash
    Commented Jun 9, 2017 at 14:07
18

A simple and efficient (linear complexity) solution using filter and Set:

const valuesArr = ['v1', 'v2', 'v3', 'v4', 'v5'];   
const removeValFromIndex = [0, 2, 4];

const indexSet = new Set(removeValFromIndex);

const arrayWithValuesRemoved = valuesArr.filter((value, i) => !indexSet.has(i));

console.log(arrayWithValuesRemoved);

The great advantage of that implementation is that the Set lookup operation (has function) takes a constant time, being faster than nevace's answer, for example.

1
  • yes has was not working with arrays earlier I tried [...new Set(xyz)]
    – Om Fuke
    Commented Mar 4, 2021 at 23:44
12

I find this the most elegant solution:

const oldArray = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
const removeItems = [1, 3, 5]

const newArray = oldArray.filter((value) => {
    return !removeItems.includes(value)
})

console.log(newArray)

output:

[2, 4]

or even shorter:

const newArray = oldArray.filter(v => !removeItems.includes(v))
1
  • 2
    Thanks clean and simple!
    – cNgamba
    Commented Aug 30, 2022 at 14:48
11

This works well for me and work when deleting from an array of objects too:

var array = [ 
    { id: 1, name: 'bob', faveColor: 'blue' }, 
    { id: 2, name: 'jane', faveColor: 'red' }, 
    { id: 3, name: 'sam', faveColor: 'blue' }
];

// remove people that like blue

array.filter(x => x.faveColor === 'blue').forEach(x => array.splice(array.indexOf(x), 1));

There might be a shorter more effecient way to write this but this does work.

10

It feels necessary to post an answer with O(n) time :). The problem with the splice solution is that due to the underlying implementation of array being literally an array, each splice call will take O(n) time. This is most pronounced when we setup an example to exploit this behavior:

var n = 100
var xs = []
for(var i=0; i<n;i++)
  xs.push(i)
var is = []
for(var i=n/2-1; i>=0;i--)
  is.push(i)

This removes elements starting from the middle to the start, hence each remove forces the js engine to copy n/2 elements, we have (n/2)^2 copy operations in total which is quadratic.

The splice solution (assuming is is already sorted in decreasing order to get rid of overheads) goes like this:

for(var i=0; i<is.length; i++)
  xs.splice(is[i], 1)

However, it is not hard to implement a linear time solution, by re-constructing the array from scratch, using a mask to see if we copy elements or not (sort will push this to O(n)log(n)). The following is such an implementation (not that mask is boolean inverted for speed):

var mask = new Array(xs.length)
for(var i=is.length - 1; i>=0; i--)
  mask[is[i]] = true
var offset = 0
for(var i=0; i<xs.length; i++){
  if(mask[i] === undefined){
    xs[offset] = xs[i]
    offset++
  }
}
xs.length = offset

I ran this on jsperf.com and for even n=100 the splice method is a full 90% slower. For larger n this difference will be much greater.

7
function filtermethod(element, index, array) {  
    return removeValFromIndex.find(index)
}  
var result = valuesArr.filter(filtermethod);

MDN reference is here

3
  • @riship89 The fiddle is down
    – mate64
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 12:31
  • @Karna: fiddle is down Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 17:54
  • 1
    Please note that at the time of writing (june 2014), Array.prototype.find is part of the current ES6 draft and only implemented in current firefox
    – Olli K
    Commented Jun 14, 2014 at 15:48
6

In pure JS you can loop through the array backwards, so splice() will not mess up indices of the elements next in the loop:

for (var i = arr.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    if ( yuck(arr[i]) ) {
        arr.splice(i, 1);
    }
}
1
  • Does not work yuck is not a function, so assumed it is the index of unwanted element indexes, & used yuck[arr[i]]
    – DavChana
    Commented Oct 26, 2016 at 14:00
5

A simple solution using ES5. This seems more appropriate for most applications nowadays, since many do no longer want to rely on jQuery etc.

When the indexes to be removed are sorted in ascending order:

var valuesArr = ["v1", "v2", "v3", "v4", "v5"];   
var removeValFromIndex = [0, 2, 4]; // ascending

removeValFromIndex.reverse().forEach(function(index) {
  valuesArr.splice(index, 1);
});

When the indexes to be removed are not sorted:

var valuesArr = ["v1", "v2", "v3", "v4", "v5"];   
var removeValFromIndex = [2, 4, 0];  // unsorted

removeValFromIndex.sort(function(a, b) { return b - a; }).forEach(function(index) {
  valuesArr.splice(index, 1);
});
5

Quick ES6 one liner:

const valuesArr = new Array("v1","v2","v3","v4","v5");   
const removeValFromIndex = new Array(0,2,4);

const arrayWithValuesRemoved = valuesArr.filter((value, i) => removeValFromIndex.includes(i))
1
  • Your code should run faster if you make removeValFromIndex a Set() and use removeValFromIndex.has instead of includes.
    – user3064538
    Commented Apr 8, 2020 at 19:48
2

If you are using underscore.js, you can use _.filter() to solve your problem.

var valuesArr = new Array("v1","v2","v3","v4","v5");
var removeValFromIndex = new Array(0,2,4);
var filteredArr = _.filter(valuesArr, function(item, index){
                  return !_.contains(removeValFromIndex, index);
                });

Additionally, if you are trying to remove items using a list of items instead of indexes, you can simply use _.without(), like so:

var valuesArr = new Array("v1","v2","v3","v4","v5");
var filteredArr = _.without(valuesArr, "V1", "V3");

Now filteredArr should be ["V2", "V4", "V5"]

1
  • How contains is implemented in underscore... be careful if it's equivalent to indexOf inside of filter... not optimum at all... Commented Jan 14, 2018 at 0:11
1

You can correct your code by replacing removeValFromIndex with removeValFromIndex.reverse(). If that array is not guaranteed to use ascending order, you can instead use removeValFromIndex.sort(function(a, b) { return b - a }).

2
  • Looks good to me - jsfiddle.net/mrtsherman/gDcFu/2. Although this makes the supposition that the removal list is in order.
    – mrtsherman
    Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 3:42
  • @minopret: Thanks but it will only work if indexes in removeValFromIndex are in ascending order.
    – Ajinkya
    Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 3:53
1

Here's one possibility:

valuesArr = removeValFromIndex.reduceRight(function (arr, it) {
    arr.splice(it, 1);
    return arr;
}, valuesArr.sort(function (a, b) { return b - a }));

Example on jsFiddle

MDN on Array.prototype.reduceRight

1

filter + indexOf (IE9+):

function removeMany(array, indexes) {
  return array.filter(function(_, idx) {
    return indexes.indexOf(idx) === -1;
  });
}); 

Or with ES6 filter + find (Edge+):

function removeMany(array, indexes = []) {
  return array.filter((_, idx) => indexes.indexOf(idx) === -1)
}
1
  • indexOf inside of filter... not optimum Commented Jan 14, 2018 at 0:10
1

Here's a quickie.

function removeFromArray(arr, toRemove){
    return arr.filter(item => toRemove.indexOf(item) === -1)
}

const arr1 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
const arr2 = removeFromArray(arr1, [2, 4, 6]) // [1,3,5,7]
1
  • indexOf inside of filter... not optimum Commented Jan 14, 2018 at 0:09
1

Try this

var valuesArr = new Array("v1", "v2", "v3", "v4", "v5");
console.info("Before valuesArr = " + valuesArr);
var removeValFromIndex = new Array(0, 2, 4);
valuesArr = valuesArr.filter((val, index) => {
  return !removeValFromIndex.includes(index);
})
console.info("After valuesArr = " + valuesArr);

0

Sounds like Apply could be what you are looking for.
maybe something like this would work?

Array.prototype.splice.apply(valuesArray, removeValFromIndexes );
1
  • But the .splice() method is not expecting a list of elements to remove, it is expecting a single index of the element at which to start removing followed by the number of elements to remove...
    – nnnnnn
    Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 4:06
0
var valuesArr = new Array("v1","v2","v3","v4","v5");   
var removeValFromIndex = new Array(0,2,4);

console.log(valuesArr)
let arr2 = [];

for (let i = 0; i < valuesArr.length; i++){
  if (    //could also just imput this below instead of index value
    valuesArr[i] !== valuesArr[0] && // "v1" <--
    valuesArr[i] !== valuesArr[2] && // "v3" <--
    valuesArr[i] !== valuesArr[4]    // "v5" <--
  ){
    arr2.push(valuesArr[i]);
  }
}

console.log(arr2);

This works. However, you would make a new array in the process. Not sure if thats would you want or not, but technically it would be an array containing only the values you wanted.

0

You can try Lodash js library functions (_.forEach(), _.remove()). I was using this technique to remove multiple rows from the table.

let valuesArr = [
    {id: 1, name: "dog"}, 
    {id: 2, name: "cat"}, 
    {id: 3, name: "rat"}, 
    {id: 4, name: "bat"},
    {id: 5, name: "pig"},
]; 
let removeValFromIndex = [
    {id: 2, name: "cat"}, 
    {id: 5, name: "pig"},
]; 
_.forEach(removeValFromIndex, (indi) => {
    _.remove(valuesArr, (item) => {
        return item.id === indi.id;
    });
})
console.log(valuesArr)
/*[
    {id: 1, name: "dog"},  
    {id: 3, name: "rat"}, 
    {id: 4, name: "bat"},
];*/ 

Don't forget to clone (_.clone(valuesArr) or [...valuesArr]) before mutate your array

0

This is more of a tweak to the answer by @nnnnnn, but I would also remove potential duplicate indices as this will otherwise cause additional rows to be deleted:

function arrayUnique(arr) {
    return arr.filter((value, index, array) => array.indexOf(value) === index);
}

function arrayDeleteMulti(arr, idxSet) {

    idxSet = arrayUnique(idxSet).sort(function(a,b){ return a-b; });
    
    for (var i = idxSet.length -1; i >= 0; i--)
        arr.splice(idxSet[i],1);

    return arr
}

So in this test

var arr = [`v0`, `v1`, `v2`, `v3`, `v4`, `v5`];
console.log(arrayDeleteMulti(arr, [4,4,4,0,2]))

We do get

[ "v1", "v3", "v5" ]
0

An alternative is to create a reducer, validate it by the index that returns the non-selected values and then order it.

 var valuesArr = new Array("v1", "v2", "v3", "v4", "v5");
  var r = new Array(0, 2, 4);

  const data = valuesArr
    .reduce((p, c, i) => (!r.includes(i) ? [...p, c] : p), [])
    .sort((a, b) => b - a);

  console.log(data);

-1

You could try and use delete array[index] This won't completely remove the element but rather sets the value to undefined.

1
  • Thanks but I want to remove the elements.
    – Ajinkya
    Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 3:46
-1
removeValFromIndex.forEach(function(toRemoveIndex){
    valuesArr.splice(toRemoveIndex,1);
});
1
  • 1
    Please don't post only code as answer, but also provide an explanation what your code does and how it solves the problem of the question. Answers with an explanation are usually more helpful and of better quality, and are more likely to attract upvotes. Commented Nov 18, 2020 at 13:35
-2

For Multiple items or unique item:

I suggest you use Array.prototype.filter

Don't ever use indexOf if you already know the index!:

var valuesArr = ["v1","v2","v3","v4","v5"];
var removeValFrom = [0, 2, 4];

valuesArr = valuesArr.filter(function(value, index) {
     return removeValFrom.indexOf(index) == -1;
}); // BIG O(N*m) where N is length of valuesArr and m is length removeValFrom

Do:

with Hashes... using Array.prototype.map

  var valuesArr = ["v1","v2","v3","v4","v5"];
  var removeValFrom = {};
  ([0, 2, 4]).map(x=>removeValFrom[x]=1); //bild the hash.
  valuesArr = valuesArr.filter(function(value, index) {
      return removeValFrom[index] == 1;
  }); // BIG O(N) where N is valuesArr;
0
-2

You could construct a Set from the array and then create an array from the set.

const array = [1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 5, 1];
const uniqueArray = [...new Set(array)];
console.log(uniqueArray); // Result: [1, 2, 3, 5]

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