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Here i am using two different functions for calculating CRC16 for any type of file (.txt,.tar,.tar.gz,.bin,.scr,.sh etc) and different size also varies from 1 KB to 5 GB.

I want to achieve this

   `cross platform 

   less time consuming

   Have to work proper for any type of file and any size`

i got same value of CRC in both functions. but any one can tell me which one is more better to calculate CRC16 for any type of file with any size on different different platform.

Here we have to consider 0 to 255 all type characters.

Can any body please suggest me which one is good in my requirements.

Code of both functions :

First one which has int datatype in readChar here i am using int readChar

int CRC16_int(const char* filePath) {

    //Declare variable to store CRC result.
    unsigned short result;
    //Declare loop variables.
    int intInnerLoopIndex;
    result = 0xffff; //initialize result variable to perform CRC checksum calculation.

    //Store message which read from file.
    //char content[2000000];

    //Create file pointer to open and read file.
    FILE *readFile;

    //Use to read character from file.
    int readChar;

    //open a file for Reading
    readFile = fopen(filePath, "rb");

    //Checking file is able to open or exists.
    if (!readFile) {
        fputs("Unable to open file %s", stderr);
    }
    /*
     Here reading file and store into variable.
     */
    int chCnt = 0;
    while ((readChar = getc(readFile)) != EOF) {

        //printf("charcater is %c\n",readChar);
        //printf("charcater is %c and int is %d \n",readChar,readChar);
        result ^= (short) (readChar);
        for (intInnerLoopIndex = 0; intInnerLoopIndex < 8; intInnerLoopIndex++) {
            if ((result & 0x0001) == 0x0001) {
                result = result >> 1; //Perform bit shifting.
                result = result ^ 0xa001; //Perform XOR operation on result.
            } else {
                result = result >> 1; //Perform bit shifting.
            }
        }

        //content[chCnt] = readChar;
        chCnt++;
    }
    printf("\nCRC data length in file: %d", chCnt);
    //This is final CRC value for provided message.
    return (result);
}

Second one is unsigned char datatype of readChar Here i am using unsigned char readChar

int CRC16_unchar(const char* filePath) {

    unsigned int filesize;
    //Declare variable to store CRC result.
    unsigned short result;
    //Declare loop variables.
    unsigned int intOuterLoopIndex, intInnerLoopIndex;
    result = 0xffff; //initialize result variable to perform CRC checksum calculation.
    FILE *readFile;
    //Use to read character from file.
    //The problem is if you read a byte from a file with the hex value (for example) 0xfe, 
    //then the char value will be -2 while the unsigned char value will be 254. 
    //This will significantly affect your CRC 
    unsigned char readChar;
    //open a file for Reading
    readFile = fopen(filePath, "rb");
    //Checking file is able to open or exists.
    if (!readFile) {
        fputs("Unable to open file %s", stderr);
    }
    fseek(readFile, 0, SEEK_END); // seek to end of file
    filesize = ftell(readFile); // get current file pointer
    fseek(readFile, 0, SEEK_SET); // seek back to beginning of file
    /*
     Here reading file and store into variable.
     */
    int chCnt = 0;

    for (intOuterLoopIndex = 0; intOuterLoopIndex < filesize; intOuterLoopIndex++) {
        readChar = getc(readFile);
        printf("charcater is %c and int is %d\n",readChar,readChar);

                result ^= (short) (readChar);
                for (intInnerLoopIndex = 0; intInnerLoopIndex < 8; intInnerLoopIndex++) {
                    if ((result & 0x0001) == 0x0001) {
                        result = result >> 1; //Perform bit shifting.
                        result = result ^ 0xa001; //Perform XOR operation on 
                    } else {
                        result = result >> 1; //Perform bit shifting.
                    }
                }
                chCnt++;
    }
    printf("\nCRC data length in file: %d", chCnt);
    return (result);
}

Please Help me to figure out this problem

Thanks

  • A 16-bit CRC is not very adequate for covering files from 1K to 5GB. For such large data chunks, there is high probability of CRC matching even with data errors. – TJD Feb 24 '12 at 17:37
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First things first. Don't do file reading (or whatever the source is) and CRC calculating in the same function. This is bad design. File reading is typically not completely platform independent (although POSIX is your best friend), but CRC calculation can be done very platform independently. Also you might want to reuse your CRC algorithm for other kind of data sources which aren't accessed with fopen().

To give you a hint, the CRC function I always drop in to my projects has this prototype:

uint16_t Crc16(const uint8_t* buffer, size_t size, 
                            uint16_t polynomial, uint16_t crc);

You don't have to call the function once and feed it the complete contents of the file. Instead you can loop through the file in blocks and call the function for each block. The polynomial argument in your case is 0xA001 (which is BTW a polynomial in 'reversed' form), and the crc argument is set to 0xFFFF the first time. Each subsequent time you call the function you pass the previous return value of the function to the crc argument.

In your second code frament (CRC16_unchar) you first determine the filesize and then read that number of bytes. Don't do that, it unnecessary limits you to handle files of maximum 4GB (in the most cases). Just reading until EOF is cleaner IMHO.

Furthermore I see that you are struggling with signed/unsigned bytes. Do know that

  • printf doesn't know if you pass an signed or unsigned integer. You tell printf with '%d' or '%u' how to interpret the integer.
  • Even in C itself there is hardly a difference between a signed and unsigned integer. C won't magically change the value of 255 to -1 if you do int8_t x = 255.

See this anser for more details about when C uses the signedness of an integer: When does the signedness of an integer really matter?. Rule of thumb: Just always use uint8_t for handling raw bytes.

So both functions are fine regarding signedness/integer size.

EDIT: As other users indicated in their answers, read the file in block instead per-byte:

uint16_t CRC16_int(const char* filePath) {
    FILE *readFile;
    const uint8_t buf[1024];
    size_t len;
    uint16_t result = 0xffff;;

    /* Open a file for reading. */
    readFile = fopen(filePath, "rb");
    if (readFile == NULL) {
        exit(1); 
    }

    /* Read until EOF. */
    while ( (len = fread(buf, sizeof(buf), 1, readFile)) > 0 ) {
        result = Crc16(buf, len, 0xA001, result);
    }

    /* readFile could be in error state, check it with ferror() or feof() functions. */

    return result;
}

Also you should alter you function prototype to make it possible to return an error, e.g.:

// Return true when successful, false on error. CRC is stored in result.
bool CRC16_int(const char* filePath, uint16_t *result)
  • 1
    Isn't there a problem in the first function in result ^= (short) (readChar); because of readChar being an int? Characters may have values outside of the 0...127 range and result in sign-extension when converted to int or short. – Alexey Frunze Feb 24 '12 at 10:20
  • @Alex: Indeed, when casting the signedness is considered. I forgot about that (and looked over that line of code too). I'll edit my answer. – Bart Feb 24 '12 at 10:32
  • I just double checked with the standard, thanks to @user1089679, getc()/fgetc() does conversion to unsigned char internally, so, it shouldn't be a problem here. – Alexey Frunze Feb 24 '12 at 10:53
  • @Bart I cant understand your this line "Just reading until EOF is cleaner IMHO." EOF is -1 value so in .tar.gz file i getting some problem because 255 converted in to -1 and its EOF so i cant read whole file – user1089679 Feb 24 '12 at 11:24
  • @Bart stackoverflow.com/q/9413009/1089679 please refer my this question which creates problem in EOF – user1089679 Feb 24 '12 at 11:26
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You want to read and write 8-bit bytes using unsigned char instead of plain char because char can be either signed or unsigned and that's up to the compiler (allowed by the C standard). So, the value you get from getc() should be converted to unsigned char prior to being used in the CRC calculations. You could also fread() into an unsigned char. If you work with signed chars, sign extension of chars into ints will likely break your CRC calculations.

Also, per the C standard fseek(FilePtr, 0, SEEK_END) has undefined behavior for binary streams and binary streams need not meaningfully support SEEK_END in fseek(). In practice, though, this usually works as we want.

Another thing you should consider is checking for I/O errors. Your code is broken in this respect.

  • but here fgetc is always return unsinged char so it never gives signed char – user1089679 Feb 24 '12 at 10:35
  • @user1089679: Just double checked with the standard, you're right. – Alexey Frunze Feb 24 '12 at 10:49
  • Can u please tell me which one is better may be i think unsigned char one is better – user1089679 Feb 24 '12 at 10:55
  • I personally prefer to use signed ints only where they are needed even if it means I need to write an extra unsigned here or there. At the same time, for greater portability I'd rather rely on EOF than on fseek()+ftell(). So, I'd combine the two. – Alexey Frunze Feb 24 '12 at 10:59
  • :) :) combine of two...good. but May be EOF will be behaving different on other platform ? – user1089679 Feb 24 '12 at 11:02
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The datatype you do the calculation with should, in my opinion, not be the same that you read from the file. Doing one function call into the runtime library to read a single byte is simply not efficient. You should probably read on the order of 2-4 KB at a time, and then iterate over each returned "chunk" in whatever manner you choose.

There's also absolutely no point in reading in the size of the file in advance, you should simply read until reading returns less data than expected, in which case you can inspect feof() and ferror() to figure out what to do, typically just stop since you're done. See the fread() manual page.

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