54

I know that in JS, objects are passed by reference, for example:

function test(obj) {
    obj.name = 'new name';
}

var my_obj = { name: 'foo' };
test(my_obj);
alert(my_obj.name); // new name

But why doesn't the below work:

function test(obj) {
    obj = {};
}

var my_obj = { name: 'foo' };
test(my_obj);
alert(my_obj.name); // foo

I have set the object to {} (empty) but it still says foo.

Can any one explain the logic behind this?

4
  • 7
    That's because objects are not passed by reference ;)
    – user395760
    Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 21:11
  • @delnan But there are. See how currentObject changes $scope.countries -> jsfiddle.net/ay1wpr5L/2 Commented Dec 24, 2014 at 11:16
  • @Imray That's not pass by reference, as explained by multiple answers below.
    – user395760
    Commented Dec 24, 2014 at 11:25
  • Freaking javascript. I love it and hate it all at the same time... Commented Mar 31, 2016 at 17:32

4 Answers 4

67

If you are familiar with pointers, that's an analogy you can take. You're actually passing a pointer, so obj.someProperty would dereference to that property and actually override that, while merely overriding obj would kill off the pointer and not overwrite the object.

5
  • 2
    +1 - nicely done, and clearer than my answer (assuming OP knows about pointers) Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 21:13
  • @AdamRackis I +1'd your answer because it uses the JS terminology and brought above analogy to mind ; ) Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 21:14
  • Thanks this one clarified it :)
    – Sarfraz
    Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 21:17
  • 1
    Why didn't I find this answer when I searched for this last week!? This finally answered my question as well, many thanks!
    – Campbeln
    Commented May 1, 2014 at 5:12
  • Good to remember at this point is that when one declares a function with some param (like obj here) that obj is kind of new thing. It's like saying: var obj; // undefined inside that function. So if we are doing some assignments, we're actually altering local variable inside the function and we are breaking the "reference" (pointer). Commented Oct 4, 2015 at 22:46
30

Because JavaScript actually passes objects by pass-by-copy-reference.

When you pass my_obj into your test function, a copy of a reference to that object is passed in. As a result, when you re-assign the object in test, you're really only re-assigning a copy of a reference to the original object; your original my_obj remains un-changed.

3
  • 2
    If it is copy, then it why does it work in first example i have posted ? In my first example also then it should remain un-touched ?
    – Sarfraz
    Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 21:08
  • 2
    @Dev555 - it's a copy of a reference to the object - I edited to be more clear. In your first case, obj is a copy of a reference that points to your real object. Adding a property will work fine. If I were there in person I could draw some pictures of boxes with arrows that I think would help a lot :) Commented Feb 24, 2012 at 21:10
  • So how to initialize objects? Initially i had this instance.initGrid($(instance.mainEntityContainer), instance.mainEntityList); instance.initGrid($(instance.dependantEntityContainer), instance.dependantEntityList);, I had to transform this to the following: instance.mainEntityList = instance.initGrid($(instance.mainEntityContainer)); instance.dependantEntityList = instance.initGrid($(instance.dependantEntityContainer)); Still I wonder how to "free memory" from previous initializations. Whether I just have to make instance.dependantEntityList = null somewhere? I have "= new ..." inside.
    – Alexander
    Commented Dec 1, 2015 at 16:55
26

Because you are overwriting the reference, not the object.

// Create a new object and assign a reference to it
// to the variable my_obj
var my_obj = { name: 'foo' };

// Pass the reference to the test function
test(my_obj);

// Assign the reference to a variable called obj
// (since that is the first argument)
function test(obj) {
// Create a new (empty) object and assign a reference to it to obj
// This replaces the existing REFERENCE
    obj = {};
}
// my_obj still has a reference to the original object, 
// because my_obj wasn't overwritten
alert(my_obj.name); // foo
3
  • You are overwriting the copy of the reference, not the reference. If you would overwrite the reference itself, everything would be fine.
    – Alex
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 14:32
  • 3
    So how would you overwrite my_obj if you wanted to? Commented Dec 24, 2014 at 11:18
  • @CodyBugstein Wrap it in another object. Another answer on this question, stackoverflow.com/a/13452001/841830, shows this, along with some other possible approaches. Or, if you don't like any of those approaches, I think the answer is basically: you can't overwrite my_obj. Commented Mar 7, 2017 at 16:12
5

Javascript lacks support for passing by reference (although objects are passed by reference and the reference is maintained as long as it is not overwrited with assignment eg. using =), but you can imitate ref keyword of C# using the following technique:

function test(obj) {
  obj.Value = {};
  //obj.Value = {name:"changed"};
}

var my_obj = { name: 'foo' };

(function ()
{
  my_obj = {Value: my_obj};
  var $return = test(my_obj);
  my_obj = my_obj.Value;
  return $return;
}).call(this);

alert(my_obj.name); // undefined, as expected
                    // In the question this returns "foo" because
                    // assignment causes dereference

Of course you can use globals and call function without arguments, in which case the references are not missed like this:

var obj = { name: 'foo' };
function test() {
    obj = {};
}
test();
alert(obj.name); // undefined

If you have all your code in closure, then things are simpler and above like globals doesn't pollute global namespace:

(function(){
    var obj = { name: 'foo' };
    function test() {
        obj = {};
    }
    test();
    alert(obj.name); // undefined
}).call(this);

The above "globals inside closure" -technique is nice if you have to port to Javascript some C# code which has ref arguments. Eg. The following C# code:

void MainLoop()
{
   // ...
   MyStruct pt1 = CreateMyStruct(1);
   MyStruct pt2 = CreateMyStruct(2);
   SwapPoints(ref pt1, ref pt2);
   // ...
}
void SwapPoints(ref MyStruct pt1, ref MyStruct pt2)
{
    MyStruct tmp = pt1;
    pt1 = pt2;
    pt2 = tmp;
}

could be ported to Javascript using something like:

(function(){
    var pt1, pt2;
    function CreateMyStruct(myvar)
    {
      return {"myvar":myvar}  
    }
    function MainLoop()
    {
       // ...
       pt1 = CreateMyStruct(1);
       pt2 = CreateMyStruct(2);
       console.log("ORIG:",pt1,pt2); 
       SwapPoints(); 
       console.log("SWAPPED:",pt1,pt2);
       // ...
    }
    function SwapPoints()
    {
        var tmp = pt1;
        pt1 = pt2;
        pt2 = tmp;
    }
    MainLoop();

}).call(this);

or if it's essential to use local variables and function arguments, then solution can be based on the first example of my answer like this:

(function(){
    function CreateMyStruct(myvar)
    {
      return {"myvar":myvar}  
    }
    function MainLoop()
    {
      // ...
      var pt1 = CreateMyStruct(1);
      var pt2 = CreateMyStruct(2);
      console.log("ORIG:",pt1,pt2); 

      (function ()
      {
        pt1 = {Value: pt1};
        pt2 = {Value: pt2};
        var $return = SwapPoints(pt1, pt2);
        pt1 = pt1.Value;
        pt2 = pt2.Value;
        return $return;
      }).call(this);

      console.log("SWAPPED:",pt1,pt2);
      // ...
    }
    function SwapPoints(pt1, pt2)
    {
      var tmp = pt1.Value;
      pt1.Value = pt2.Value;
      pt2.Value = tmp;
    }
    MainLoop();
}).call(this);

Really have to say that Javascript lacks much when it has not native ref! The code would be much simpler.

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