128

I have a MySQL dump of one of my databases. In it, there are DEFINER clauses which look like,

"DEFINER=`root`@`localhost`" 

Namely, these DEFINER clauses are on my CREATE VIEW and CREATE PROCEDURE statements. Is there a way to remove these DEFINER clauses from my dump file?

1

26 Answers 26

118

I don't think there is a way to ignore adding DEFINERs to the dump. But there are ways to remove them after the dump file is created.

  1. Open the dump file in a text editor and replace all occurrences of DEFINER=root@localhost with an empty string ""

  2. Edit the dump (or pipe the output) using perl:

    perl -p -i.bak -e "s/DEFINER=\`\w.*\`@\`\d[0-3].*[0-3]\`//g" mydatabase.sql
    
  3. Pipe the output through sed:

    mysqldump ... | sed -e 's/DEFINER[ ]*=[ ]*[^*]*\*/\*/' > triggers_backup.sql
    
17
  • 1
    @FastTrack, please remove the entire string. – Abhay Feb 26 '12 at 7:53
  • 3
    I suggest to mention that instead of removing the DEFINER it can be set to CURRENT_USER like that: sed -E 's/DEFINER=[^]+@[^]+/DEFINER=CURRENT_USER/g' dump.sql > new_dump.sql It has the advantage of keeping restrictions / access control. – 4thfloorstudios Oct 5 '16 at 9:18
  • 30
    The sed command does not remove DEFINER clause from procedures and functions. Here is the enhanced version that handles views, triggers, procedures and functions: sed -e 's/DEFINER[ ]*=[ ]*[^*]*\*/\*/' | sed -e 's/DEFINER[ ]*=[ ]*[^*]*PROCEDURE/PROCEDURE/' | sed -e 's/DEFINER[ ]*=[ ]*[^*]*FUNCTION/FUNCTION/' – Vladimir Strugatsky Mar 3 '17 at 1:36
  • 5
    FYI --- although it was not the case at the time of this answer, MySQL > 5.6 now ships with a mysqldump(1) that supports "--skip-definer" as an option: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/… – Kevin_Kinsey Aug 14 '18 at 20:53
  • 7
    No, it's not mysqldump, but mysqlpump who has --skip-definer. – Xdg Jan 5 '19 at 18:39
77

You can remove using SED

sed -i 's/DEFINER=[^*]*\*/\*/g' mydump.sql

In MacOS:

sed -i '' 's/DEFINER=[^*]*\*/\*/g' mydump.sql
4
  • What is going on here in MacOS to be different? – Alex Jan 8 '19 at 13:01
  • 1
    The manpage for sed on mac says this: -i extension "Edit files in-place, saving backups with the specified extension. If a zero-length extension is given, no backup will be saved. It is not recommended to give a zero-length extension when in-place editing files, as you risk corruption or partial content in situations where disk space is exhausted, etc." – Chad Jan 13 '20 at 22:13
  • Nice to know that, @Chad. I'm using sed like this in mac for 5+ years now. I never had problems with space or corrupted files. But of course, is something to consider. Thanks for clarifying. – Ricardo Martins Jan 15 '20 at 3:08
  • I've never run into those issues on Mac either. Just thought I would clarify since @Alex asked :) – Chad Jan 15 '20 at 19:46
62

Since mysql version 5.7.8 you can use the --skip-definer option with mysqlpump, e.g.:

mysqlpump --skip-definer -h localhost -u user -p yourdatabase

See updated mysql manual at http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/mysqlpump.html#option_mysqlpump_skip-definer

3
  • 12
    For whoever wonders what's the difference between mysqldump and mysqlpump - here is related question: dba.stackexchange.com/questions/118846/mysqldump-vs-mysqlpump – Scadge Dec 8 '17 at 14:09
  • I have phpMyAdmin and MySQL Workbench installed. How do I execute this command on Windows? – posfan12 Jun 28 '18 at 5:29
  • (after some tests: -1) It uses information_schema.user, and this isn't always readable for all users – bato3 Dec 7 '18 at 1:28
19

I used these ideas to strip the DEFINER clause from my own mysqldump output, but I took a simpler approach:

Just remove the ! before the code and DEFINER, and the rest of the comment becomes a regular comment.

Example:

/*!50017 DEFINER=`user`@`111.22.33.44`*/

is rendered helpless, as little as doing this ..

/* 50017 DEFINER=`user`@`111.22.33.44`*/

The easiest regexp, though, is to remove the ! and the numbers

mysqldump | /usr/bin/perl -pe 's/\!\d+ DEFINER/DEFINER/' > dumpfile.sql

That removes !#### DEFINER and replaces with DEFINER ... you could remove DEFINER too, it doesn't really matter - once the "!" is gone

18

As per the other's recommendations, here is an example of how to remove the DEFINER from the dump, after the dump has finished:

mysqldump -u user --password='password' -h localhost database | grep -v "50013 DEFINER" > dump.sql
1
  • 5
    For triggers, the lines look like /*!50003 CREATE*/ /*!50017 DEFINER=user@localhost*/ /*!50003 trigger my_triggername BEFORE INSERT ON my_table FOR EACH ROW .... */;; and grep -v will drop those lines entirely. (although 50017 != 50013) – Kenney Aug 19 '14 at 12:55
14

As others mentioned stripping the definer with any kind of regular expression is not too complex. But the other examples stripped the view definitions for me.

This is the regular expression which worked for me:

sed -e 's/DEFINER=[^ ]* / /'
1
  • 1
    Doesn't work with triggers - removes also the */. MySQL 5.6.31. – Franc Drobnič Oct 26 '16 at 11:50
12

For an automated solution, you could look at mysqlmigrate. It's a Bash wrapper around mysqldump which allows you to migrate databases and ignore the DEFINER statements. Example:

$ mysqlmigrate -u root -p pass --ignore-definer from_db to_db

http://thesimplesynthesis.com/post/mysqlmigrate (or GitHub)

Otherwise, yes, a command like Abhay points out is needed:

$ mysqldump -u root -ppass the_db | sed -e 's/DEFINER[ ]*=[ ]*[^*]*\*/\*/' > the_db.sql
0
7

You should look the answer here: https://dba.stackexchange.com/questions/9249/how-do-i-change-the-definer-of-a-view-in-mysql/29079#29079

The best way in my opinion to address this problem, is not adding an extra parse of string with sed or grep or any other, instead mysqldump is able to generate a good dump by adding --single-transaction

3
  • Why downvoted? Why this answer is not considered useful? – Jose Nobile Apr 10 '17 at 21:54
  • 1
    Your response still needs about 90 upvotes to get the position it deserves. You have mine :) – Patrick van Bergen Dec 14 '18 at 9:44
  • I just spent the past 4 hours trying to dump a database. Cant believe it was something so simple! Thanks – A. Fletcher Oct 20 '20 at 16:05
6

Another option on OSX to remove definers in-file:

sed -i '' 's/DEFINER=`[^`][^`]*`@`[^`][^`]*`//g' file.sql
5

A quick way to do this is to pipe the output of mysqldump through sed to remove the DEFINER statements wrapped in conditional comments. I use this to remove DEFINER from CREATE TRIGGER statements, but you can tweak the condition comment version number in the regex to suit your purposes.

mysqldump -u user --password='password' -h localhost database | \
  sed 's/\/\*!50017 DEFINER=`.*`@`.*`\*\///' 
1
  • 1
    A slightly more readable sed statement: sed "s/DEFINER(.*?)FUNCTION/FUNCTION/" – reustmd Sep 11 '13 at 20:05
4

Not sure if it helps but I use SQLyog Community Edition, available at: -

https://code.google.com/p/sqlyog/wiki/Downloads

When dumping sql or copying to another database it allows you to 'Ignore DEFINER'

It is free and provides the basic functionality that a lot of people require

There is also a paid version available from: -

https://www.webyog.com/product/sqlyog

Cheers

1
  • Rather than just flag as 'not useful' perhaps it would be more useful if you reply with why you feel it is not useful? – itfidds Jul 23 '14 at 8:22
3

For me, this works: perl -p -i.bak -e "s/DEFINER=[^ |\s]*//g" yourdump.dmp. This removed DEFINER=root@localhost from my dump, on each create procedure statment

0
2

Here is a complete working solution to remove DEFINER information for MySQL 5.6.x and Linux.(Tested on CentOS 6.5).

Usaually we have to replace following entries from Mysql dump(if taken along with data and triggers/routines/functions).

/*!50013 DEFINER=`MYSQLUSER`@`localhost` SQL SECURITY DEFINER */
/*!50013 DEFINER=`MYSQLUSER`@`%` SQL SECURITY DEFINER */
CREATE DEFINER=`MYSQLUSER`@`%` PROCEDURE `PROCEDURENAME`(
CREATE DEFINER=`MYSQLUSER`@`localhost` PROCEDURE `PROCEDURENAME`(
CREATE DEFINER=`MYSQLUSER`@`%` FUNCTION `FUNCTIONNAME`(
CREATE DEFINER=`MYSQLUSER`@`localhost` FUNCTION `FUNCTIONNAME`(
/*!50003 CREATE*/ /*!50017 DEFINER=`MYSQLUSER`@`%`*/ /*!50003 TRIGGER `TRIGGERNAME`
/*!50003 CREATE*/ /*!50017 DEFINER=`MYSQLUSER`@`localhost`*/ /*!50003 TRIGGER `TRIGGERNAME`

The dump was taken with below mysqldump command.

mysqldump -uMYSQLUSER -pPASSWORD DATABASENAME -R > dbdump.sql

The required dump file with no DEFINER information can be obtained with below three commands.

Command-1    
sed -i 's|DEFINER=[^*]*\*|\*|g' [PATH/]dbdump.sql

Command-2
find -name [PATH/]dbdump.sql | xargs perl -pi -e "s/ DEFINER=\`MYSQLUSER\`@\`localhost\`//"

Command-3
find -name [PATH/]dbdump.sql | xargs perl -pi -e "s/ DEFINER=\`MYSQLUSER\`@\`%\`//"

If the dump file is in your current folder then ignore [PATH/].

If data in tables is very huge then take the dump in two files, in one dump file take the dump with data and in other dump file on take the dump of the scripts only (Triggers/Functions/Procedures.) and run the above three commands on 2nd dump(scripts) file.

1

Replace all of your definer users with CURRENT_USER. In my gradle script that creates the backup, my replace script looks like:

ant.replaceregexp(file: "$buildDir/sql/setupDB.sql", match: "`${project.ext.prod_db_username}`@`%`", replace: "CURRENT_USER", byline: true);

which really is just calling ANT. Then you won't have to worry about it.

1

The only way I could get it working under Windows:

Install http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/ to have sed in the command line and add it to the Windows PATH: D:\programs\GetGnuWin32\bin;

sed -i "s|DEFINER=`mydbuser`@`%%` SQL SECURITY DEFINER||g" "D:/prod_structure.sql"

sed -i "s|DEFINER=`mydbuser`@`%%`||g" "D:/prod_structure.sql"

mysqldump -P{port} -h{host} -u{user} -p{password} --routines --no-data --lock-tables=false database_prod > D:\prod_structure.sql
1

Thank you all for the hints. Being lazy, I wrote a script named: "MYsqldump" :

DB=$1
HOST=$2
USER=$3
MYSQLDUMP='/usr/bin/mysqldump'
PARAMS="--complete-insert --disable-keys=0 --extended-insert=0 --routines=0 --skip-comments"
DAY=`date +%d`
MONTH=`date +%m`
YEAR=`date +%Y`
FILE=$DB.$DAY-$MONTH-$YEAR.sql

    if (( $# < 3 )) ; then
        echo ""
        echo "usage: MYsqldump <db> <host> <user>"
        echo ""
        exit 1
    fi

    $MYSQLDUMP -h $HOST -u $USER -p  $PARAMS $DB | grep -v '/*!50013 DEFINER' > $FILE
1

For something like:

DELIMITER ;;
CREATE DEFINER=`mydb`@`localhost` FUNCTION `myfunction`() RETURNS int(11)
begin
(...)
end ;;

Try this:

mysqldump --force --routines --opt --user=myuser --databases mydb | sed -e 's/DEFINER=`.*`@`.*`\ //g'
1
  1. open your database with any editor, I used with notepad++,

  2. find all test that DEFINER=root@localhost and replace it with nothing("") IE. delete it.

Then you can import it to the any host that you want.

1

Best way of dumping and restoring without problems:

MYSQL DUMP

mysqldump -h HOST -u USER -pPASSWORD --single-transaction --quick --skip-lock-tables --triggers --routines --events DATABASE | gzip > "DATABASE.sql.gz" &

MYSQL RESTORE

gunzip DATABASE.sql.gz

sed -i 's/DEFINER=[^ ]* / /' DATABASE.sql
sed -i 's/SET @MYSQLDUMP_TEMP_LOG_BIN = @@SESSION.SQL_LOG_BIN;/ /' DATABASE.sql
sed -i 's/SET @@SESSION.SQL_LOG_BIN= 0;/ /' DATABASE.sql
sed -i 's/SET @@GLOBAL.GTID_PURGED='';/ /' DATABASE.sql
sed -i 's/SET @@SESSION.SQL_LOG_BIN = @MYSQLDUMP_TEMP_LOG_BIN;/ /' DATABASE.sql

mysql -h HOST -u USER -pPASSWORD < DATABASE.sql
1

On Linux machines you can use this one-liner:

mysql -uuser -ppwd -A --skip-column-names -e"SELECT CONCAT('SHOW CREATE VIEW ',table_schema,'.',table_name,';') FROM information_schema.tables WHERE engine IS NULL and table_schema like 'mydb%'" | mysql -uuser -ppwd -A --skip-column-names | sed -rn 's/.*?VIEW ([^\s]+?) (AS .*?)\s([^\s]+?)\s([^\s]+?)/DROP VIEW \1;\nCREATE VIEW \1 \2;/p' | mysql -uuser -ppwd -A --skip-column-names

You have only to replace strings in bold with your DB user credentials and database name / like pattern.

More info here: https://blog.novoj.net/posts/2014-05-16-recreate-mysql-views-without-definer-one-liner-solution-linux/

0

The simplest regex that works for me with all objects is:

sed 's/DEFINER=[^ ]*`//' ...

Note that quote-names has to be TRUE (which is by default).

Hope that in newer versions the switch --skip-definer introduced in mysqlpump in version 5.7 comes to mysqldump, too.

0

I have used PowerShell script to remove all the lines with DEFINER:

get-content $file_in_full_path | select-string -pattern $line_string_delete -notmatch | Out-File -width 1000000000 -Encoding Default $file_out_full_path

0

Nothing was working for me, so I needed to write my own regex.

  1. Try to dump your database into file, cat whole file and grep only your definer statements to see them.

    cat file.sql | grep -o -E '.{,60}DEFINER.{,60}'

  2. Write your regex

  3. Pipe your dump into sed with this regex. For example mine statement is:

    mysqldump | sed -E 's//*!500[0-9][0-9] DEFINER=.+?*///' | sed -E 's/DEFINER=?[^ ]+??@?[^ ]+? ?//'

  4. Profit!

0

remove_definers.bat:

@echo off
(for /f "tokens=1,2*" %%a in (dumpfile.sql) do (
 if "%%b"=="" (echo %%a) else (
  echo %%b | find "DEFINER" > null && echo %%a %%c || echo %%a %%b %%c
 )
)) > dumpfile_nodefiners.sql
0

Referring to https://stackoverflow.com/a/19707173/1488762, I suspect the following may perform better on very large databases - modify the definer at the end, rather than performing additional regex processing on every line:

mysqldump myDB > dump.sql
cat >> dump.sql << END
SELECT CONCAT("ALTER DEFINER=`youruser`@`host` VIEW ", 
table_name, " AS ", view_definition, ";") 
FROM information_schema.views 
WHERE table_schema='myDB';
END
0

Just for my future reference, sd version.

mysqldump ... | sd 'DEFINER=.*?\*' '*' > file.sql

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