21

I ran into what seemed a mysterious bug this morning that I feel very lucky to have stumbled upon a solution for quite quickly.

I was dividing by a counter to produce an average inside of a fragment shader, and of course when the counter is zero, the resulting color value became NaN.

During blending, NVidia gracefully treats a NaN as a 0 value, but Intel does not and appears to cascade the NaN, resulting in black fragments.

And so this bug persisted until I tested the code on an Intel machine.

I wonder if there is something I could do to "trap" invalid values. It seems that, just as in regular programming, the only surefire (and even then it doesn't feel bulletproof) way to deal with this is to carefully consider all possible cases when dividing numbers.

The standard way to detect a NaN is to see if a number is not equal to itself. Could I perhaps build a debug shader which checks each fragment to see if it is not equal to itself, and if that condition is met, set a flashing, conspicuous color? Does GLSL allow me to detect a NaN this way or am I stuck with undefined behavior whenever a value is invalid?

2
  • Why do you divide by 0 at all? Can't you catch the counter being 0 or change your algorithm?
    – djmj
    Commented Mar 7, 2012 at 3:50
  • 3
    It's reasonable for a programmer to always check if a potential denominator could be zero but checking might incur a performance cost. My question is related to the detection of bad values after the fact.
    – Steven Lu
    Commented Mar 7, 2012 at 8:26

2 Answers 2

29

I was dividing by a counter to produce an average inside of a fragment shader, and of course when the counter is zero, the resulting color value became NaN.

That's not how floats work. When you divide by zero, you get INF, not NaN. Unless the numerator is also zero, in which case you do get NaN.

In any case, GLSL offers the isinf and isnan functions, which do what they say.

1
  • 2
    Ah. That's very convenient. Turns out they were NaN since the numerator would always be zero if the denominator was.
    – Steven Lu
    Commented Feb 25, 2012 at 18:53
12

Lack of isnan is problem for WebGL and Opengl ES 2.0. Polyfill which works for all GPUs I had an opportunity to try:

bool isnan( float val )
{
  return ( val < 0.0 || 0.0 < val || val == 0.0 ) ? false : true;
  // important: some nVidias failed to cope with version below.
  // Probably wrong optimization.
  /*return ( val <= 0.0 || 0.0 <= val ) ? false : true;*/
}
3
  • 3
    OpenGL ES GLSL 3+ has isnan. Commented Dec 14, 2015 at 20:41
  • 1
    NVIDIA fails to cope with this because of its very aggressive optimizer.
    – Ruslan
    Commented Jul 15, 2016 at 13:31
  • 3
    FWIW Java defines it as boolean isNaN(float f) {return f != f;},
    – barneypitt
    Commented Apr 21, 2018 at 21:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.