I read in "Java Concurrency In Practice" that "publishing objects before they are fully constructed can compromise thread safety". Could someone explain this?

Consider this code:

public class World{
    public static Point _point;

    public static void main(String[] args){
        new PointMaker().start();
        System.out.println(_point);
    }
}

public class Point{
    private final int _x, _y;

    public Point(int x, int y){
        _x = x;
        World._point = this;//BAD: publish myself before I'm fully constructed
        //some long computation here
        _y = y;
    }

    public void toString(){
        return _x + "," + _y;
    }
}

public class PointMaker extends Thread{
    public void run(){
        new Point(1, 1);
    }
}

Because Point publishes itself before setting the value of _y, the call to println may yield "1,0" instead of the expected "1,1".

(Note that it may also yield "null" if PointMaker + Point.<init> don't get far enough to set the World._point field before the call to println executes.)

  • 1
    To be exact, it may even print "0,0". If we leak the this reference from the constructor, the JLS doesn't make any guarantees wrt finals. – Voo Feb 26 '12 at 15:21

new operator is allowed to return a value before the constructor of the class finishes. So a variable might not read null but contains an uninitialized class instance. This happens due to byte reordering.

Some clarification: From a single thread perspective the JVM is allowed to reorder some instruction. When creating an instance traditionally you would think it goes like this:

  • allocate memory
  • run initialization (constructor)
  • assign reference to var

While in fact the JVM might do something like:

  • allocate memory
  • assign reference to var
  • run initialization (constructor)

This has performance advantages since addresses don't need to be lookup up again. From a single thread perspective this doesn't change the order of the logic. You're program works fine. But this poses a problem in multithreaded code. This means the reference can be published before the constructor has run. Therefor you need to an 'happens-before' rule to make sure the instance is fully initialized. Declaring variables volatile dos enforce such happens-before rules.

More on reordering: http://www.cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/jsr-133-faq.html#reordering

  • Could you cite a source? – musiKk Feb 25 '12 at 21:35
  • @musiKk good question, searching for it. – M Platvoet Feb 25 '12 at 21:41
  • 2
    I would have thought that, instead of this, the reference is likely talking about publishing the object within the constructor (or something that it calls). I cannot think of a case where the new operator returns an object reference before the constructor that is called is complete. – arcy Feb 25 '12 at 22:54
  • 1
    @Travis Any source for this? For one, constructors may be inlined just as any other code and then there's no guarantee that one assignment happens before another. The only guarantees the JLS gives on this topic is that the reference isn't assigned before all final variables have been set - and that was added with the Java5 Memory Model. Now I also think the question is about publishing the this reference itself in which case we lose even the finals guarantee, but that doesn't change the fact that the answer here contains only facts. – Voo Feb 26 '12 at 15:25
  • 1
    Also we don't need a source for this - at least it'll be pretty hard to find this spelled out in the JLS, because it's just the usual "as-if" rule. As long as assigning the not fully constructed object to the reference does not change single-threaded behavior and does not violate any other rules specified by the JLS (in this case the whole finals stuff) the JVM is allowed to do it if it wants to.. – Voo Feb 26 '12 at 15:28

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