45

I am using a scoped enum to enumerate states in some state machine that I'm implementing. For example, let's say something like:

enum class CatState
{
    sleeping,
    napping,
    resting
};

In my cpp file where I define a state transition table, I would like to use something equivalent to using namespace X so that I don't need to prefix all my state names with CatState::. In other words, I'd like to use sleeping instead of CatState::sleeping. My transition table has quite a few columns, so avoiding the CatState:: prefix would keep things more compact and readable.

So, is there a way to avoid having to type CatState:: all the time?


Yeah, yeah, I'm already aware of the pitfalls of using namespace. If there's an equivalent for strongly-typed enums, I promise to only use it inside a limited scope in my cpp implementation file, and not for evil.

27

So, is there a way to avoid having to type CatState:: all the time?

Not before C++20. Just as there's no equivalent for having to type ClassName:: for static class members. You can't say using typename ClassName and then get at the internals. The same goes for strongly typed enums.

C++20 will add using enum X syntax, which does what it looks like.

You can of course not use enum class syntax, just using regular enums. But then you lose strong typing.

It should be noted that one of the reasons for using ALL_CAPS for weakly typed enums was to avoid name conflicts. Once we have full scoping and strong typing, the name of an enum is uniquely identified and cannot conflict with other names. Being able to bring those names into namespace scope would reintroduce this problem. So you would likely want to use ALL_CAPS again to help disambiguate the names.

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  • 1
    +1 Thanks. I was imagining the strong enum to be something like a namespace, but thinking about it as a (somewhat) class makes more sense now. – Emile Cormier Feb 26 '12 at 4:02
  • 7
    As of C++20 via paper p1099r4 this will no longer be the case, thankfully. – hak8or Jul 20 '19 at 15:32
  • 2
    To each their own, but I personally don't like the ALL_CAPS convention for enumerators due to the possibility of clashing with macros. NULL in particular is one that annoys me when doing JSON stuff in C++. – Emile Cormier Jan 5 at 5:35
17

So the short answer is no, but fortunately this is going to change in a recently finalized feature set of C++20. According to this accepted proposal you will be able to do the following:

enum class CatState
{
    sleeping,
    napping,
    resting
};

std::string getPurr(CatState state)
{
    switch (state)
    {
        using enum CatState;
        // our states are accessible without the scope operator from now on

        case sleeping:      return {};      // instead of "case CatState::sleeping:"
        case napping:       return "purr";
        case resting:       return "purrrrrr";
    }
}
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  • So glad this is in C++20! This makes scoped enums much more useful. PS: Put the using as low as possible, in this case inside the switch (see edit) – Flamefire Nov 6 '19 at 7:33
11

You might consider using a typedef to shorten the qualified names:

typedef CatState C;

Or, if the columns are repetitive in a way that they can be generated easily, you might consider using a macro to generate each row in the table, which can lead to very concise (and easier to read) code.

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  • So you're saying that there's no equivalent of using namespace for enums? If that's the case, then a short typedef seems like the best solution for me. – Emile Cormier Feb 26 '12 at 3:49
  • Not that I know of, no. You may be able to use a using declaration for each enumerator (e.g., using CatState::sleeping;, etc.), but I'm not 100% sure. If the code is highly repetitive, though, I'd strongly recommend a macro. – James McNellis Feb 26 '12 at 3:51
  • +1 I ended up using your typedef suggestion, but Nicol gave the direct answer to my question. I wish I could accept both answers. – Emile Cormier Feb 26 '12 at 4:04
  • @James it is forbidden to use a using-declaration on scoped enumerators. – Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 26 '12 at 12:12
  • 4
    the typedef can also be spelled: using C = CatState; – Arvid Feb 7 '19 at 0:41
3

Nicol's answer is correct: the language is designed to make you always qualify scoped enumerators (except in the enum { } scope itself).

However, here is a technique I came up with for "scoped" enumerators that are unscoped within chosen classes. Technically, the enumerators are unscoped, so they will still convert implicitly to int. (Not "strongly-typed" as you put it.) Nevertheless, in the idiom they are accessed using the scope operator after a true enum name, so syntactically there isn't a difference — and therefore it requires C++11.

#define IMPORTABLE_ENUM( TYPENAME, ... ) \
\
struct import_ ## TYPENAME { \
    enum TYPENAME { \
        __VA_ARGS__ \
    }; \
}; \
\
typedef import_ ## TYPENAME :: TYPENAME TYPENAME;

// usage:
IMPORTABLE_ENUM ( duck, huey, dewey, louie )

duck d = duck::dewey; // can't use unscoped enumerators here

struct duck_madness : private import_duck { // but inside a derived class
    duck who_did_it() { return huey; } // qualification is unnecessary
};
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2

I would also love to have this possibility and I find the limitation quite annoying. It's usually best to have the programmer decide which features he wants to use. Either explicit scoping or the more convenient way. If you restrict the programmer he will either drop the whole feature for the sake of convenience or invent ugly workarounds, like the following template based type safe enum. It will have a some overhead when compiled without optimization.

template<class _Enum>
class type_safe_enum
{
private:
    _Enum m_EnumValue;
    operator int();
public:
    inline operator _Enum() const { return m_EnumValue; }
    inline void operator =(_Enum x) { m_EnumValue = x; }
};

enum _MY_ENUM
{
    Value1,
    Value2
};

enum _MY_ENUM2
{
    Value3,
    Value4
};

typedef type_safe_enum<_MY_ENUM> MY_ENUM;

void TestMyEnum()
{
    MY_ENUM myEnum;
    int x;

    myEnum = Value1; // ok
    // myEnum = Value3; // compilation error
    // myEnum = 0; // compilation error
    // x = myEnum; // compilation error

}
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  • 3
    Your _Enum and other _[A-Z]+ identifiers lead to undefined behavior, see rules about underscores. Namely, All identifiers that begin with an underscore and either an uppercase letter or another underscore are always reserved for any use.; If the program declares or defines an identifier in a context in which it is reserved<...>, the behavior is undefined.. – Ruslan Jan 4 '16 at 19:57

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