278

I need to round for example 6.688689 to 6.7, but it always shows me 7.

My method:

Math.round(6.688689);
//or
Math.round(6.688689, 1);
//or 
Math.round(6.688689, 2);

But result always is the same 7... What am I doing wrong?

13 Answers 13

488
Number((6.688689).toFixed(1)); // 6.7
  • 19
    Convert a number to a string and then back again? That can't be fast. – csl Nov 9 '12 at 14:07
  • 10
    JS benchmark: jsperf.com/decimal-rounding-tofixed-vs-math-round – user2019515 May 31 '14 at 4:05
  • 2
    as JS benchmark show, it is slower than @fivedigit method – fadomire Mar 2 '15 at 13:42
  • 10
    Number((456.1235).toFixed(3)) -> 456.123, Number((1.235).toFixed(2)) -> 1.24... Stupid JavaSript... – NoOne Jun 21 '15 at 9:31
  • 6
    This might NOT DO what you expect! The result can even depend on the browser, see this question: stackoverflow.com/q/566564/2224996 – maja Jul 18 '15 at 13:09
195
var number = 6.688689;
var roundedNumber = Math.round(number * 10) / 10;
  • 27
    +1 Fastest method and mathematical – mate64 Jun 2 '14 at 15:10
  • 7
    +100! Great performance improvement – Philip George Oct 16 '14 at 12:52
  • 11
    This doesn't always work. Take Math.round(1.005*100)/100 for example from MDN – tybro0103 May 3 '16 at 17:54
  • 7
    @tybro0103 Floating point evil: 1.005 * 100 = 100.49999999999999 (at least in the JS engine I tried). That's why it doesn't work and why you should never rely on floats being perfectly accurate. – sudo Jan 22 '18 at 6:10
  • 3
77

Use toFixed() function.

(6.688689).toFixed(); // equal to 7
(6.688689).toFixed(1); // equal to 6.7
(6.688689).toFixed(2); // equal to 6.69
  • 3
    This might NOT DO what you expect! The result can even depend on the browser, see this question: stackoverflow.com/q/566564/2224996 – maja Jul 18 '15 at 13:09
  • 5
    (6.688689).toFixed(); is equal to "7" not 7. Same for other examples. – Vado Nov 30 '15 at 5:38
31

Upd (2019-10). Thanks to Reece Daniels code below now available as a set of functions packed in npm-package expected-round (take a look).


You can use helper function from MDN example. Than you'll have more flexibility:

Math.round10(5.25, 0);  // 5
Math.round10(5.25, -1); // 5.3
Math.round10(5.25, -2); // 5.25
Math.round10(5, 0);     // 5
Math.round10(5, -1);    // 5
Math.round10(5, -2);    // 5

Upd (2019-01-15). Seems like MDN docs no longer have this helper funcs. Here's a backup with examples:

// Closure
(function() {
  /**
   * Decimal adjustment of a number.
   *
   * @param {String}  type  The type of adjustment.
   * @param {Number}  value The number.
   * @param {Integer} exp   The exponent (the 10 logarithm of the adjustment base).
   * @returns {Number} The adjusted value.
   */
  function decimalAdjust(type, value, exp) {
    // If the exp is undefined or zero...
    if (typeof exp === 'undefined' || +exp === 0) {
      return Math[type](value);
    }
    value = +value;
    exp = +exp;
    // If the value is not a number or the exp is not an integer...
    if (isNaN(value) || !(typeof exp === 'number' && exp % 1 === 0)) {
      return NaN;
    }
    // If the value is negative...
    if (value < 0) {
      return -decimalAdjust(type, -value, exp);
    }
    // Shift
    value = value.toString().split('e');
    value = Math[type](+(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] - exp) : -exp)));
    // Shift back
    value = value.toString().split('e');
    return +(value[0] + 'e' + (value[1] ? (+value[1] + exp) : exp));
  }

  // Decimal round
  if (!Math.round10) {
    Math.round10 = function(value, exp) {
      return decimalAdjust('round', value, exp);
    };
  }
  // Decimal floor
  if (!Math.floor10) {
    Math.floor10 = function(value, exp) {
      return decimalAdjust('floor', value, exp);
    };
  }
  // Decimal ceil
  if (!Math.ceil10) {
    Math.ceil10 = function(value, exp) {
      return decimalAdjust('ceil', value, exp);
    };
  }
})();

Usage examples:

// Round
Math.round10(55.55, -1);   // 55.6
Math.round10(55.549, -1);  // 55.5
Math.round10(55, 1);       // 60
Math.round10(54.9, 1);     // 50
Math.round10(-55.55, -1);  // -55.5
Math.round10(-55.551, -1); // -55.6
Math.round10(-55, 1);      // -50
Math.round10(-55.1, 1);    // -60
Math.round10(1.005, -2);   // 1.01 -- compare this with Math.round(1.005*100)/100 above
Math.round10(-1.005, -2);  // -1.01
// Floor
Math.floor10(55.59, -1);   // 55.5
Math.floor10(59, 1);       // 50
Math.floor10(-55.51, -1);  // -55.6
Math.floor10(-51, 1);      // -60
// Ceil
Math.ceil10(55.51, -1);    // 55.6
Math.ceil10(51, 1);        // 60
Math.ceil10(-55.59, -1);   // -55.5
Math.ceil10(-59, 1);       // -50
  • 2
    ?? "Math.round10 is not a function" – Peter Krauss Dec 31 '18 at 3:37
  • 1
    I found this extremely useful so whacked it in a quick npm package for those looking to use it without bloating extra code. Credited @a.s.panchenko with the original answer also: npmjs.com/package/expected-round – Reece Daniels Oct 17 at 14:42
13
> +(6.688687).toPrecision(2)
6.7

A Number object in JavaScript has a method that does exactly what you need. That method is Number.toPrecision([precision]).

Just like with .toFixed(1) it converts the result into a string, and it needs to be converted back into a number. Done using the + prefix here.

simple benchmark on my laptop:

number = 25.645234 typeof number
50000000 x number.toFixed(1) = 25.6 typeof string / 17527ms
50000000 x +(number.toFixed(1)) = 25.6 typeof number / 23764ms
50000000 x number.toPrecision(3) = 25.6 typeof string / 10100ms
50000000 x +(number.toPrecision(3)) = 25.6 typeof number / 18492ms
50000000 x Math.round(number*10)/10 = 25.6 typeof number / 58ms
string = 25.645234 typeof string
50000000 x Math.round(string*10)/10 = 25.6 typeof number / 7109ms
  • In my opinion this is the best answer (best in term of best practice, most straightforward approach). – cezar Aug 22 at 10:58
8

If you not only want to use toFixed() but also ceil() and floor() on a float then you can use the following function:

function roundUsing(func, number, prec) {
    var tempnumber = number * Math.pow(10, prec);
    tempnumber = func(tempnumber);
    return tempnumber / Math.pow(10, prec);
}

Produces:

> roundUsing(Math.floor, 0.99999999, 3)
0.999
> roundUsing(Math.ceil, 0.1111111, 3)
0.112

UPD:

The other possible way is this:

Number.prototype.roundUsing = function(func, prec){
    var temp = this * Math.pow(10, prec)
    temp = func(temp);
    return temp / Math.pow(10, prec)
}

Produces:

> 6.688689.roundUsing(Math.ceil, 1)
6.7
> 6.688689.roundUsing(Math.round, 1)
6.7
> 6.688689.roundUsing(Math.floor, 1)
6.6
7

My extended round function:

function round(value, precision) {
  if (Number.isInteger(precision)) {
    var shift = Math.pow(10, precision);
    return Math.round(value * shift) / shift;
  } else {
    return Math.round(value);
  }
} 

Example Output:

round(123.688689)     // 123
round(123.688689, 0)  // 123
round(123.688689, 1)  // 123.7
round(123.688689, 2)  // 123.69
round(123.688689, -2) // 100
6

See below

var original = 28.59;

var result=Math.round(original*10)/10 will return you returns 28.6

Hope this is what you want..

  • 5
    "If I had a dime for every time I've seen someone use FLOAT to store currency, I'd have $999.997634" -- Bill Karwin. – emix Aug 9 '18 at 13:03
  • 1
    Wrong. Math.round(1.015 * 100) / 100 – Marco Marsala Sep 18 at 8:47
3
float(value,ndec);
function float(num,x){
this.num=num;
this.x=x;
var p=Math.pow(10,this.x);
return (Math.round((this.num).toFixed(this.x)*p))/p;
}
2

I think this function can help.

 function round(value, ndec){
    var n = 10;
    for(var i = 1; i < ndec; i++){
        n *=10;
    }

    if(!ndec || ndec <= 0)
        return Math.round(value);
    else
        return Math.round(value * n) / n;
}


round(2.245, 2) //2.25
round(2.245, 0) //2
1

I think below function can help

function roundOff(value,round) {
   return (parseInt(value * (10 ** (round + 1))) - parseInt(value * (10 ** round)) * 10) > 4 ? (((parseFloat(parseInt((value + parseFloat(1 / (10 ** round))) * (10 ** round))))) / (10 ** round)) : (parseFloat(parseInt(value * (10 ** round))) / ( 10 ** round));
}

usage : roundOff(600.23458,2); will return 600.23

  • Could you explain what this answer adds that hasn't already been covered by the previous answers? – stealththeninja Sep 8 '17 at 19:45
1

if you're under node.js context, you can try mathjs

const math = require('mathjs')
math.round(3.1415926, 2) 
// result: 3.14
  • Or browseify, of course – peterb Nov 2 '17 at 11:06
0

If you're using Browserify today, you're going to have to try: roundTo a very useful NPM lib

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