In an HTML header, I've got this:

<head>
<title>Title</title>
<link href="styles.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
<link href="master.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>

styles.css is my page-specific sheet. master.css is a sheet I use on each of my projects to override browser defaults. Which of these stylesheets takes priority? Example: first sheet contains specific

body { margin:10px; }

And associated borders, but the second contains my resets of

html, body:not(input="button") {
    margin: 0px;
    padding: 0px;
    border: 0px;
}

In essence, does the cascading element of CSS work the same in terms of stylesheet references as it does in typical CSS functions? Meaning that the last line is the one displayed?

  • I just now realized this would be better suited for Webmasters. Would there be a better place to post this? – ian5v Feb 27 '12 at 1:42
  • 8
    Right here is good. – Blender Feb 27 '12 at 1:43
  • 4
    body:not(input="button") is not a valid selector by the way. You probably meant to split it into body, input:not([type="button"]). – BoltClock Feb 27 '12 at 2:12
  • That's interesting. I don't believe I've seen such syntax before. I'm still new, but those double brackets are foreign to me. – ian5v Mar 5 '12 at 1:53
  • those brackets are for attribute selectors: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/Attribute_selectors @topic: probably you want to switch the order of the stylesheets: Your general master.css should load first, then it's way easier to overrule the master-styles in your styles.css. – grilly Feb 22 '16 at 15:35
up vote 141 down vote accepted

The rules for CSS rule cascading are complex -- rather than trying to paraphrase them badly, I'll simply refer you to the spec:

http://www.w3.org/TR/2011/REC-CSS2-20110607/cascade.html#cascade

In short: more specific rules override more general ones. Specificity is defined based on how many IDs, classes, and element names are involved, as well as whether the !important declaration was used. When multiple rules of the same "specificity level" exist, whichever one appears last wins.

  • 1
    Then there's no specific rule as to in what order stylesheets load? I understand how CSS displays in terms of specificity, but then I'll assume my master sheet will load unless overridden. – ian5v Feb 27 '12 at 1:49
  • 10
    Actually, !important participates directly in the cascade, and has nothing to do with specificity. Specificity is related to selectors, whereas !important is used with property declarations. (So you're right in saying that the rules are complex! ;) – BoltClock Feb 27 '12 at 2:16
  • 2
    So do stylesheets load the same way as elements, the last taking precedence if they are of the same specificity? – ian5v Mar 5 '12 at 1:54
  • 3
    @iananananan: Basically, the browser never sees CSS in terms of individual stylesheets. If there are multiple stylesheets, they are all treated as if they were one giant stylesheet, and rules are evaluated accordingly. – BoltClock Sep 19 '14 at 7:38
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    @user34660 BoltClock's comment is from the perspective of CSS styling. You're correct that the stylesheets are kept separate in the DOM, but that separation doesn't affect how those styles get applied to anything. – duskwuff Apr 3 '16 at 2:14

The most specific style is applied:

div#foo {
  color: blue; /* This one is applied to <div id="foo"></div> */
}

div {
  color: red;
}

If all of the selectors have the same specificity, then the most recent decleration is used:

div {
  color: red;
}

div {
  color: blue; /* This one is applied to <div id="foo"></div> */
}

In your case, body:not([input="button"]) is more specific so its styles are used.

  • 1
    See my comment on the question regarding that last selector. – BoltClock Feb 27 '12 at 2:14
  • 1
    The specificity rule make things harder when we need to override un-editable stylesheet! – KeepMove Jul 2 '15 at 14:37

Order does matter. The last declared value of multiple occurrence will be taken. Please see the same one I worked out: http://jsfiddle.net/Wtk67/

<div class="test">Hello World!!</div>


<style>
    .test{
        color:blue;
    }

    .test{
        color:red;
    }
</style>

If you interchange the order of .test{}, then you can see the HTML takes value of the last one declared in CSS

  • 3
    So you should add the most specific CSS last. – live-love Oct 30 '14 at 16:37

The last loading CSS is THE MASTER, which will override all css with same css settings

Example:

<head>
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="css/reset.css">
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="css/master.css">
</head>

reset.css

h1 {
    font-size: 20px;
}

master.css

h1 {
    font-size: 30px;
}

The output for the h1 tag will be font-size: 30px;

  • 1
    Hi. In my case the first defined .css is loaded last. Are they applied in order they are loaded or in order they are defined? – Eugen Konkov Dec 13 '17 at 13:09

It depends on both load order and the specificity of the actual rules applied to each style. Given the context of your question you want to load your general reset first, then the page specific. Then if youre still not seeing the intended effect you need to look into the specificity of the selectors involved as others have already pointed out.

Lets try to simplify the cascading rule with an example. The rules goes more specific to general.

  1. Applies rule of the ID's one first (over class and/or elements regardless of the order)
  2. Applies classes over elements regardless of order
  3. If no class or id, applies the generic ones
  4. Applies the last style in the order (declaration order based on file load order) for the same group/level.

Here is the css and html code;

<style>
    h2{
        color:darkblue;
    }
    #important{
        color:darkgreen;
    }
    .headline {
        color:red;
    }
    article {
        color:black;
        font-style:italic;
    }
    aside h2 {
        font-style:italic;
        color:darkorange;
    }
    article h2 {
        font-style: normal;
        color: purple;
    }
</style>

Here is the css style

<body>
<section>
    <div>
        <h2>Houston Chronicle News</h2>
        <article>
            <h2 class="headline" id="important">Latest Developments in your city</h2>
            <aside>
                <h2>Houston Local Advertisement Section</h2>
            </aside>
        </article>
    </div>

    <p>Next section</p>
</section>

Here is the result. No matter the order of style files or the style declaration, id="important" applies at the end (note the class="deadline" declared last but does not take any effect).

The <article> element contains <aside> element, however last declared style will take effect, in this case article h2 { .. } on third h2 element.

Here is the result on IE11: (Not enough rights to post image)DarkBlue: Houston Chronicle News, DarkGreen: Latest Developments in your city, Purple: Houston Local Advertisement Section, Black: Next section

enter image description here

The best way is to use classes as much as possible. Avoid ID selectors (#) anyway. When you write selectors with just single classes, the CSS inheritance is way more easy follow.

Update: Read more about CSS specificity in this article: https://css-tricks.com/specifics-on-css-specificity/

I suspect from your question that you have duplicate selections, a master set, that goes for all pages, and a more specific set that you wish to override the master values for each individual page. If that is the case, then your order is correct. The Master is loaded first and the rules in subsequent file will take precedence (if they are identical or have the same weight). There is a highly recommended description of all rules at this website http://vanseodesign.com/css/css-specificity-inheritance-cascaade/ When I started with front end development, this page cleared up so many questions.

Yes, it works the same as if they were in one sheet, however:

Load Order Matters!

<link href="styles.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>
<link href="master.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"/>

In the above code, there is no guarantee that master.css will load after styles.css. Therefore, if master.css is loaded quickly, and styles.css takes a while, styles.css will become the second stylesheet, and any rules of the same specificity from master.css will be overwritten.

Best to put all your rules into one sheet (and minify) before deploying.

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