106

I need to show a currency value in the format of 1K of equal to one thousand, or 1.1K, 1.2K, 1.9K etc, if its not an even thousands, otherwise if under a thousand, display normal 500, 100, 250 etc, using javascript to format the number?

16 Answers 16

157

Sounds like this should work for you:

function kFormatter(num) {
    return Math.abs(num) > 999 ? Math.sign(num)*((Math.abs(num)/1000).toFixed(1)) + 'k' : Math.sign(num)*Math.abs(num)
}
    
console.log(kFormatter(1200)); // 1.2k
console.log(kFormatter(-1200)); // -1.2k
console.log(kFormatter(900)); // 900
console.log(kFormatter(-900)); // -900

  • Love the ternary operator, short clean and concise. – Carl Weis Feb 27 '12 at 8:04
  • 1
    Minor fix suggested... Should be lowercase k for thousands. Upper is for Kilos. Tried to edit, but requires at least 6 characters changed before it will take. – Adam Youngers Dec 19 '14 at 18:47
  • @AdamYoungers changed – Jake Feasel Dec 19 '14 at 18:51
  • How do I inset a php variable inside here and use it? i.e. if my number variable is $mynumber_output where do I insert this to use it? For example, say $mynumber_output = 12846, I would like 12846 converted to 12.8k – user7537274 Feb 8 '17 at 23:13
  • Note that one kilobyte is 1024 bytes in some cases: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilobyte – Olle Härstedt May 1 '17 at 0:01
161

A more generalized version:

function nFormatter(num, digits) {
  var si = [
    { value: 1, symbol: "" },
    { value: 1E3, symbol: "k" },
    { value: 1E6, symbol: "M" },
    { value: 1E9, symbol: "G" },
    { value: 1E12, symbol: "T" },
    { value: 1E15, symbol: "P" },
    { value: 1E18, symbol: "E" }
  ];
  var rx = /\.0+$|(\.[0-9]*[1-9])0+$/;
  var i;
  for (i = si.length - 1; i > 0; i--) {
    if (num >= si[i].value) {
      break;
    }
  }
  return (num / si[i].value).toFixed(digits).replace(rx, "$1") + si[i].symbol;
}

/*
 * Tests
 */
var tests = [
  { num: 1234, digits: 1 },
  { num: 100000000, digits: 1 },
  { num: 299792458, digits: 1 },
  { num: 759878, digits: 1 },
  { num: 759878, digits: 0 },
  { num: 123, digits: 1 },
  { num: 123.456, digits: 1 },
  { num: 123.456, digits: 2 },
  { num: 123.456, digits: 4 }
];
var i;
for (i = 0; i < tests.length; i++) {
  console.log("nFormatter(" + tests[i].num + ", " + tests[i].digits + ") = " + nFormatter(tests[i].num, tests[i].digits));
}

  • 1
    Something is wrong.. nFormatter(759878, 1) //759.9k nFormatter(759878, 0) //76k – Switch Jan 25 '16 at 21:05
  • @switch there was a flaw in my regex, fixed. – Salman A Jan 26 '16 at 10:36
  • 1
    Small fix for numbers less < 1000, add {value: 1E0, symbol: ""} to var si = – Dimmduh Aug 11 '16 at 10:09
  • 1
    @GiovanniAzua just replace if (num >= si[i].value) with if (Math.abs(num) >= si[i].value) – Salman A May 22 '17 at 7:27
  • 1
    @M.Octavio the regex is used to trim trailing zeros e.g. 1.0 becomes 1 and 1.10 becomes 1.1 – Salman A Aug 27 '18 at 20:17
60

Further improving Salman's Answer because it returns nFormatter(33000) as 33.0K

function nFormatter(num) {
     if (num >= 1000000000) {
        return (num / 1000000000).toFixed(1).replace(/\.0$/, '') + 'G';
     }
     if (num >= 1000000) {
        return (num / 1000000).toFixed(1).replace(/\.0$/, '') + 'M';
     }
     if (num >= 1000) {
        return (num / 1000).toFixed(1).replace(/\.0$/, '') + 'K';
     }
     return num;
}

now nFormatter(33000) = 33K

  • 2
    Anyway to do this without rounding the number? 1,590,000 will return 1.6M. – Brett Hardin Sep 30 '14 at 17:48
  • @BrettHardin You could do toFixed(2) or toFixed(3)... – Tony Barnes Oct 6 '15 at 15:59
  • 3
    Sometimes its hard to know when to post a new answer of edit an existing one, something I use to decide is if I steal the code from another users answer, I usually edit their answer so that they can get the recognition instead of me stealing their code. – M H Feb 19 '16 at 17:09
50

Here's a simple solution that avoids all the if statements (with the power of Math).

var SI_SYMBOL = ["", "k", "M", "G", "T", "P", "E"];

function abbreviateNumber(number){

    // what tier? (determines SI symbol)
    var tier = Math.log10(number) / 3 | 0;

    // if zero, we don't need a suffix
    if(tier == 0) return number;

    // get suffix and determine scale
    var suffix = SI_SYMBOL[tier];
    var scale = Math.pow(10, tier * 3);

    // scale the number
    var scaled = number / scale;

    // format number and add suffix
    return scaled.toFixed(1) + suffix;
}

Bonus Meme

What does SI stand for?

  • 1
    This is a more elegant approach and I need to start utilizing math more in programming for sure. – Jason Sebring Feb 1 '17 at 16:31
  • @JasonSebring thanks! – Waylon Flinn Feb 1 '17 at 18:44
  • I really like your solution. To be able to shorten negative values as well, I multiply the number by -1 before and after determining the tier, since Math.log10(negativeValue) would return NaN. – ksa Jun 14 '17 at 10:26
  • 3
    Interesting how a prefix becomes a suffix... – trincot Jul 8 '17 at 14:13
  • @trincot finally fixed that – Waylon Flinn Jun 29 '18 at 18:41
19
/**
 * Shorten number to thousands, millions, billions, etc.
 * http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metric_prefix
 *
 * @param {number} num Number to shorten.
 * @param {number} [digits=0] The number of digits to appear after the decimal point.
 * @returns {string|number}
 *
 * @example
 * // returns '12.5k'
 * shortenLargeNumber(12543, 1)
 *
 * @example
 * // returns '-13k'
 * shortenLargeNumber(-12567)
 *
 * @example
 * // returns '51M'
 * shortenLargeNumber(51000000)
 *
 * @example
 * // returns 651
 * shortenLargeNumber(651)
 *
 * @example
 * // returns 0.12345
 * shortenLargeNumber(0.12345)
 */
function shortenLargeNumber(num, digits) {
    var units = ['k', 'M', 'G', 'T', 'P', 'E', 'Z', 'Y'],
        decimal;

    for(var i=units.length-1; i>=0; i--) {
        decimal = Math.pow(1000, i+1);

        if(num <= -decimal || num >= decimal) {
            return +(num / decimal).toFixed(digits) + units[i];
        }
    }

    return num;
}

Thx @Cos for comment, I removed Math.round10 dependency.

  • 1
    I find your solution to be the most elegant, however that round10 ruins it for me. – Cos Mar 18 '15 at 16:35
  • You can change the if to Math.abs(num) >= decimal. – Conor Pender Jul 19 '17 at 16:33
9

Give Credit to Waylon Flinn if you like this

This was improved from his more elegant approach to handle negative numbers and ".0" case.

The fewer loops and "if" cases you have, the better IMO.

function abbreviateNumber(number) {
    var SI_POSTFIXES = ["", "k", "M", "G", "T", "P", "E"];
    var tier = Math.log10(Math.abs(number)) / 3 | 0;
    if(tier == 0) return number;
    var postfix = SI_POSTFIXES[tier];
    var scale = Math.pow(10, tier * 3);
    var scaled = number / scale;
    var formatted = scaled.toFixed(1) + '';
    if (/\.0$/.test(formatted))
      formatted = formatted.substr(0, formatted.length - 2);
    return formatted + postfix;
}

jsFiddle with test cases -> https://jsfiddle.net/xyug4nvz/7/

  • Thanks for fixing all my bugs. :D – Waylon Flinn Jun 16 '17 at 15:29
  • 1
    There's still an annoying bug: abbreviateNumber(999999) == '1000k' instead of '1M'. This is because toFixed() also rounds the numbers. Not sure how to fix it, though :/ – Vitor Baptista Sep 7 '17 at 11:24
  • @VitorBaptista If toFixed() rounds the number anyway, you might as well round the number before sending it to abbreviateNumber(), so it returns 1M instead of 1000k. Not a solution, but a workaround. – forsureitsme Mar 22 '18 at 19:47
  • 1
    If you don't want rounding you can do this after the scale step: const floored = Math.floor(scaled * 10) / 10; – tybro0103 Apr 13 at 2:24
7

this is is quite elegant.

function formatToUnits(number, precision) {
  const abbrev = ['', 'k', 'm', 'b', 't'];
  const unrangifiedOrder = Math.floor(Math.log10(Math.abs(number)) / 3)
  const order = Math.max(0, Math.min(unrangifiedOrder, abbrev.length -1 ))
  const suffix = abbrev[order];

  return (number / Math.pow(10, order * 3)).toFixed(precision) + suffix;
}

formatToUnits(12345, 2)
==> "12.35k"
formatToUnits(0, 3)
==> "0.000"
  • fail when number = 0 – Wayou May 30 '18 at 9:13
  • 1
    @Wayou fixed, hopefully – Novellizator May 30 '18 at 20:21
4

Further improving @Yash's answer with negative number support:

function nFormatter(num) {
    isNegative = false
    if (num < 0) {
        isNegative = true
    }
    num = Math.abs(num)
    if (num >= 1000000000) {
        formattedNumber = (num / 1000000000).toFixed(1).replace(/\.0$/, '') + 'G';
    } else if (num >= 1000000) {
        formattedNumber =  (num / 1000000).toFixed(1).replace(/\.0$/, '') + 'M';
    } else  if (num >= 1000) {
        formattedNumber =  (num / 1000).toFixed(1).replace(/\.0$/, '') + 'K';
    } else {
        formattedNumber = num;
    }   
    if(isNegative) { formattedNumber = '-' + formattedNumber }
    return formattedNumber;
}

nFormatter(-120000)
"-120K"
nFormatter(120000)
"120K"
  • 1
    Sometimes its hard to know when to post a new answer of edit an existing one, something I use to decide is if I steal the code from another users answer, I usually edit their answer so that they can get the recognition instead of me stealing their code. – M H Feb 19 '16 at 17:09
4

You can use the d3-format package modeled after Python Advanced String Formatting PEP3101 :

var f = require('d3-format')
console.log(f.format('.2s')(2500)) // displays "2.5k"
  • Very cool. That seems a lot cleaner than my original solution. Thank you. – Carl Weis Nov 17 '15 at 19:21
1

This post is quite old but I somehow reached to this post searching for something. SO to add my input Numeral js is the one stop solution now a days. It gives a large number of methods to help formatting the numbers

http://numeraljs.com/

  • 1
    numeraljs is not maintained anymore. The most active fork seems to be numbro. But neither of them support the SI/metric notation – Vincent de Lagabbe Nov 3 '15 at 10:36
1

Adding on the top answer, this will give 1k for 1000 instead of 1.0k

function kFormatter(num) {
    return num > 999 ? num % 1000 === 0 ? (num/1000).toFixed(0) + 'k' : (num/1000).toFixed(1) + 'k' : num
}
0
/*including negative values*/    
function nFormatter(num) {
      let neg = false;
       if(num < 0){
         num = num * -1;
         neg = true;
       }
       if (num >= 1000000000) {
         if(neg){
           return -1 * (num / 1000000000).toFixed(1).replace(/\.0$/, '') + 'G';  
         }
         return (num / 1000000000).toFixed(1).replace(/\.0$/, '') + 'G';
       }
       if (num >= 1000000) {
         if(neg){
           return -1 * (num / 1000000).toFixed(1).replace(/\.0$/, '') + 'M';  
         }
         return (num / 1000000).toFixed(1).replace(/\.0$/, '') + 'M';
       }
       if (num >= 1000) {
         if(neg){
           return -1 * (num / 1000).toFixed(1).replace(/\.0$/, '') + 'K';  
         }
         return (num / 1000).toFixed(1).replace(/\.0$/, '') + 'K';
       }
       return num;
    }
0
  • Support negative number
  • Checking for !Number.isFinite
  • Change ' K M G T P E Z Y' to ' K M' if you want the max unit is M

Number.prototype.prefix = function (precision = 2) {

    var units = ' K M G T P E Z Y'.split(' ');

    if (this < 0) {
        return '-' + Math.abs(this).prefix(precision);
    }

    if (this < 1) {
        return this + units[0];
    }

    var power = Math.min(
        Math.floor(Math.log(this) / Math.log(1024)),
        units.length - 1
    );

    return (this / Math.pow(1024, power)).toFixed(precision) + units[power];
}

(10240).prefix() // 10.00K
(1234000).prefix(1) // 1.2M
(-10000).prefix() // -9.77K
0

A modified version of Waylon Flinn's answer with support for negative exponents:

function metric(number) {

  const SI_SYMBOL = [
    ["", "k", "M", "G", "T", "P", "E"], // +
    ["", "m", "μ", "n", "p", "f", "a"] // -
  ];

  const tier = Math.floor(Math.log10(Math.abs(number)) / 3) | 0;

  const n = tier < 0 ? 1 : 0;

  const t = Math.abs(tier);

  const scale = Math.pow(10, tier * 3);

  return {
    number: number,
    symbol: SI_SYMBOL[n][t],
    scale: scale,
    scaled: number / scale
  }
}

function metric_suffix(number, precision) {
  const m = metric(number);
  return (typeof precision === 'number' ? m.scaled.toFixed(precision) : m.scaled) + m.symbol;
}

for (var i = 1e-6, s = 1; i < 1e7; i *= 10, s *= -1) {
  // toggles sign in each iteration
  console.log(metric_suffix(s * (i + i / 5), 1));
}

console.log(metric(0));

Expected output:

   1.2μ
 -12.0μ
 120.0μ
  -1.2m
  12.0m
-120.0m
   1.2
 -12.0
 120.0
  -1.2k
  12.0k
-120.0k
   1.2M
{ number: 0, symbol: '', scale: 1, scaled: 0 }
0

This function could transform huge numbers (both positive & negative) into a reader friendly format without losing its precision:

function abbrNum(n) {
    if (!n || (n && typeof n !== 'number')) {
      return '';
    }

    const ranges = [
      { divider: 1e12 , suffix: 't' },
      { divider: 1e9 , suffix: 'b' },
      { divider: 1e6 , suffix: 'm' },
      { divider: 1e3 , suffix: 'k' }
    ];
    const range = ranges.find(r => Math.abs(n) >= r.divider);
    if (range) {
      return (n / range.divider).toString() + range.suffix;
    }
    return n.toString();
}

/* test cases */
let testAry = [99, 1200, -150000, 9000000];
let resultAry = testAry.map(abbrNum);
console.log("result array: " + resultAry);

0

A lot of answers on this thread get rather complicated, using Math objects, map objects, for-loops, regex, etc. But these approaches don't really improve the readability of the code, or the performance. A straight forward approach seems to offer the best design.

Formatting Cash value with K

const formatCash = n => {
  if (n < 1e3) return n;
  if (n >= 1e3) return +(n / 1e3).toFixed(1) + "K";
};

console.log(formatCash(2500));

Formatting Cash value with K M B T

const formatCash = n => {
  if (n < 1e3) return n;
  if (n >= 1e3 && n < 1e6) return +(n / 1e3).toFixed(1) + "K";
  if (n >= 1e6 && n < 1e9) return +(n / 1e6).toFixed(1) + "M";
  if (n >= 1e9 && n < 1e12) return +(n / 1e9).toFixed(1) + "B";
  if (n >= 1e12) return +(n / 1e12).toFixed(1) + "T";
};

console.log(formatCash(1235000));

protected by Josh Crozier May 22 '18 at 15:38

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