What command or short key can I use to exit the PostgreSQL command line utility psql?

  • 2
    @a_horse_with_no_name: I'm not shocked by the question, but the number of upvotes :) Compare e.g. to How do you quit the Vi editor with single keypress? – user272735 Jul 25 '12 at 16:04
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    Sometimes we need quick and straight forward answer than searching it in the manual to focus on the real problem.In such cases these short questions are really helpful. – App Work Nov 16 '12 at 11:35
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    The real question is not "are people capable of reading a manual", but "should enterprise software respond to standard exit sequences" like, I don't know, "exit"? Having to read the manual to quit seems seriously counter-intuitive. – Kheldar Feb 20 '14 at 14:39
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    @Kheldar Indeed, it's just bad user interface design (coupled with arrogance). People are insecure about weird things. – Iain Collins Mar 10 '14 at 20:46
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    more importantly, this post is now the first hit when i google "exit psql" – Angel S. Moreno Sep 2 '14 at 4:42
up vote 2246 down vote accepted

Type \q and then press ENTER to quit psql.

  • 19
    This won't work if you are in single user backend mode (--single). Instead use Kaarel's answer (Ctrl-D). In addition to always working in pgsql it'll work in most your other unix shells (python, mysql, etc). If you always do things the "standard" way in 'nix your brain will be less cluttered with trivia. – hobs Nov 7 '13 at 22:10
  • I actually typed that .. but it seems that on my machine it started to give me some output only after actually connecting to a database. – mkorpela Dec 30 '17 at 10:48
  • 1
    Type \? for help if just "help" doesn't help. This is a gleaming example of how not to create human computer interaction. Who thought of this great idea of \? for help and \q to quit? – Jaywalker Feb 1 at 11:37
  • Ctrl-d also help – YOung Jul 26 at 2:55

My usual key sequence is:

quit()
quit
exit()
exit
q
q()
!q
^C
help
Alt + Tab
google.com
Quit PSQL
\q

I think veterans of the psql command line usually shorten that to just:

\q
  • 2
    I tried ctrl-z, myself. It got the job done, more or less, but I wasn't entirely satisfied. :( – mjwach Jul 26 '15 at 19:03
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    cntrl+D to exit from any where – vidur punj Jan 22 at 14:41
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    This should be the accepted answer :) – coolboyjules May 7 at 21:35
  • @mjwach ctrl+z just suspends the process to the background, almost certainly not what you want. – LucidObscurity Jul 6 at 5:31

Ctrl+D is what I usually use to exit psql console.

  • 46
    This works on almost all prompts, people! – dbkaplun Jun 28 '13 at 17:27
  • Yep. This also works in bash, sh, ssh, zsh, irb, pry, python, sudo su, node, and more. It is the standard way to exit a shell of any kind. – Ajedi32 Jul 10 '15 at 19:46
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    Not just a shell. Any reasonably sane program which reads from stdin and interprets the empty string as EOF will accept ^D. – Kevin Aug 20 '15 at 20:37
  • This does not work for me, probably because I use the Dvorak keyboard layout on OSX. Neither cmd-D nor cmd-E (where D is on Qwerty) works. – NessBird Aug 7 '17 at 15:43
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    @NessBird Ctrl is not the same as Cmd. Try Control-D instead of Command-D. – Tilman Schmidt Oct 31 '17 at 14:06

For Linux command line \q + enter.

Quiting with Ctrl + D also is works

Try:

  • Ctrl+Z - this sends the TSTP signal (TSTP is short for “terminal stop”)
  • Ctrl+\ - this sends the QUIT signal

For curiosity:

  • Ctrl+D - this sends the EOF character. EOF stands for "end of file". In this concrete case it exits from the psql subprogram, as the shell is waiting for user input. This should not be 'the way to go' as it is not working if:
    • any other character is entered before - try entering some white spaces and then press Ctrl+D, it's not going to exit psql.
    • if the user input is not required at all
  • 3
    There is no need to "try" anything. The proper command to cleanly exit psql is well documented and is \q – a_horse_with_no_name Nov 7 '16 at 20:52
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    As @hobs clearly states about \q: "This won't work if you are in single user backend mode (--single). Instead use Kaarel's answer (CtrlD)". IMHO using CtrlD is not the way to go either, and I explained why above and offered an alternative. – iusting Nov 8 '16 at 7:29
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    Thank you! Ctrl+Z was the only command that worked for me - I was connected to a database via tunnel which lost the connection - neither \q nor Ctrl+D worked, but I could Ctrl+Z and then kill the suspended process – Sergey Apr 5 at 23:02

Based on PostgreSQL 11 Beta 1 Released!:

User Experience Enhancements

Another feature that fell into this category was the inability to intuitively quit from the PostgreSQL command-line (psql). There has been numerous recorded complaints of users trying to quit with the quit and exit commands, only to learn that the command to do so was \q.

We have heard your frustrations and have now added the ability to quit the command-line using the keywords quit and exit and hope that quitting a PostgreSQL session is now as enjoyable as using PostgreSQL.

  • 1
    bad habits, bad habits everywhere – w17t May 29 at 17:47
  • @randomware Could you elaborate? – Lukasz Szozda May 29 at 18:00
  • yes, i mean backslash was satisfactory and consistent with the other internal semicolonless pgsql commands, and one would do \? or \h to continue learning 'everything else' imho – w17t May 29 at 19:27
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    "There has been numerous recorded complaints" -> "backslash was satisfactory"? Heh. – Steve Bennett Jun 20 at 3:16

I learned that I could include \q in a batch .sql file, so I could have psql quit earlier from an \i operation.

For Psql console window:

Try simply Ctrl + C

It will execute the \q that quits the console mode.

protected by Erwin Brandstetter Sep 18 '14 at 22:48

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