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I'm trying to create an instance of a class to be used throughout the application.

I have two forms: form1 and form2 and I have a class called Singleton1.

I created an instance of Singleton1 in form1 called obTest:

 Singeton1 obTest = Singleton1.Instance;

From here I need to access the variable "obTest" from form2. Is it possible to do this? How I can access that variable without creating a new Singleton1 variable?

Thanks in advance.

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  • Thanks a lot for the answers. This is my first question here and I received answers after less than one minute!!
    – Fabian
    Commented Feb 27, 2012 at 17:22

8 Answers 8

2

Why are you worried about creating a new reference to the Singleton1 object? That's the point of a Singleton, that you only have one!

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  • Ok, I understand then that the correct is create a new variable called obTest2 in the form2 as instance of Singleton1. Is this correct?
    – Fabian
    Commented Feb 27, 2012 at 17:02
  • You've already accepted an answer, but yes, that's correct. Both will point to the same instance of Singleton1, assuming Singleton1 is implemented correctly. Commented Feb 27, 2012 at 18:00
2

Like so... you just need to make sure you import the namespace on both forms for your singleton class.

NOTE: There are 3 classes in this example - two of which are there to represent your forms.

    /// <summary>
    /// Singleton class
    /// </summary>
    public class Test
    {
        private static Test _instance;

        public static Test Instance
        {
            get
            {
                if (_instance == null)
                {
                    _instance = new Test();
                }

                return _instance;
            }
        }

        public string Data {get;set;}
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Form A
    /// </summary>
    public class FormA()
    {
        public FormA()
        {
            //Put some data in the 'Data' property of the singleton
            Test.Instance.Data = "value";
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Form B
    /// </summary>
    public class FormB()
    {
        public FormB()
        {
            //Get the data form the 'Data' property of the singleton
            string value = Test.Instance.Data;
        }
    }
2

Assuming that Singleton1.Instance looks like this in your implementation:

private static Singleton1 _instance;
public static Singleton1 Instance {
    get {
        if(_instance == null)
            _instance = new Singleton1();

        return _instance;
    }
}

you can safely call Singleton1.Instance from both your form1 and form2 classes as they will both be calling the same instance of the Singleton1 object.

If I create a variable in form1 like so: var oBTest = Singleton1.Instance it will give me a reference that will be pointing to the static instance of the Singleton1 object created in the above implementation. If I then create another variable in form2 like this: var oBTestForm2 = Singleton1.Instance it will also be pointing to the same static reference as the variable created in form1.

Hope that helps,

James

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  • Yes I have the correct implementation of singleton1.Instance. So, I understand that my mind must be focus in the Singleton1.Instance instead of a global variable.
    – Fabian
    Commented Feb 27, 2012 at 17:17
  • Excellent! Then you can create local variables in your two forms that point to Singleton1.Instance and be sure that you are referencing the same instance from each. Make sense? Commented Feb 27, 2012 at 17:19
  • @Fabian - not sure I quite understand your last comment. What do you mean by global variable? Commented Feb 27, 2012 at 17:20
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You would create a new variable, but it's still just a reference to the singleton object (if you created the singleton correctly that is).

Calling Singleton1.Instance multiple times will all result in the same reference, infact, that's the whole purpose of a singleton.

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1

Forget the obTest variable. Use Singleton1.Instance. If you are worried about producing invalid results, then your singleton is implemented incorrectly.

1

Yes, assuming this is what's in your form1

private Singeton1 obTest = Singleton1.Instance;

public Singeton1 GetSingletonInstance()
{
    return obTest;
}

then from form2 you can do this to get the singleton object without creating a new one

Singeton1 theObject = form1.GetSingletonInstance();
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If your Instance method is written correctly, then you should be able to call it again in Form2 and get a reference to the exact same object that was created in Form1.

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  • When you say "the exact same object" you refer to obTest or a new variable from Singleton1?
    – Fabian
    Commented Feb 27, 2012 at 17:00
  • 1
    "obTest" isn't actually an object, it's just a reference to an object. (Specifically, to an instance of Singleton1) If you call Instance again, you SHOULD get a new reference to that same object.
    – ean5533
    Commented Feb 27, 2012 at 17:11
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I'm not 100% sure what you are getting at, a new Singleton1 variable (in the sense that it creates another singleton) is not really possible, by definition of what a Singleton is supposed to enforce for your system. A new variable which points to a singleton is certainly possible, you can make as many as you want to point to the instance.

Typically Singleton1.Instance just returns a references to the one and only singleton instance, and obTest is simply a variable which references that object. The overhead of doing var x = Singleton1.Instance to get a quicker handle on the instance any time you need it is minimal, and avoids polluting the global namespace.

I would avoid making static var TheInstance = Singleton1.Instance, since Singleton1.Instance is already presumably in static scope.

If you need a good Singleton implementation, here's mine:

https://stackoverflow.com/a/1010662/18255

public class SingletonBase<T> where T : class
{
    static SingletonBase()
    {
    }

    public static readonly T Instance = 
        typeof(T).InvokeMember(typeof(T).Name, 
                                BindingFlags.CreateInstance | 
                                BindingFlags.Instance |
                                BindingFlags.Public |
                                BindingFlags.NonPublic, 
                                null, null, null) as T;
}

Declare your Singleton1 as this and you are done:

public class Singleton1 : SingletonBase<Singleton1> {
}

This is threadsafe (unlike most, including the one given here) and lazily instantiated.

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