I have a csv file, and I would like to sort it by column priority, like "order by". For example:

3;1;2
1;3;2
1;2;3
2;3;1
2;1;3
3;2;1

If this situation was the result of a "select", the "order by" would be as follows: order by column2, column1, column3 - the result would be:

2;1;3
3;1;2
1;2;3
3;2;1
1;3;2
2;3;1

I'd like to know how to get this same result using "sort" command on Unix.

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    By the way, that's an ssv file (semicolon separated values) :P – John Strood May 31 '16 at 10:38
up vote 110 down vote accepted
sort --field-separator=';' --key=2,1,3
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    Great @CharlieMartin, works fine! Thank you very much! – Rafael Orágio Feb 27 '12 at 19:51
  • 5
    If the values are numeric, then you probably want consider using the -n option which will "compare according to string numerical value" or the -g option which will "compare according to general numerical value". A string comparison of numeric values will get the numbers ordered like 1,10,2,20. At least those are options available on my version of sort on CentOS. You should verify with the man page what the correct options are on your version of sort. – Adam Porad Jun 14 '13 at 15:22
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    I get sort: stray character in field spec: invalid field specification ‘2,1,3’ – Martin Thoma Aug 19 '14 at 16:13
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    However, sort --field-separator=',' -r -k3 -k1 -k2 source.csv > target.csv worked for me. – Martin Thoma Aug 19 '14 at 16:28
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    this would never work for a real csv files that contain field separator within the column – user121196 Sep 14 '14 at 8:18

Charlie's answer above didn't work for me on Cygwin (sort version 2.0, GNU textutils), the following did:

sort -t"," -k2 -k1 -k1
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    Cygwin has an older version of sort. As always, the man page is your friend. – Charlie Martin Feb 20 '13 at 20:44
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    I agree with @CharlieMartin, you should check the man page on your system. On CentOS I used sort --field-separator=';' -k2 -k1 -k3 test.csv – Adam Porad Jun 14 '13 at 15:20

Suppose you have another row 3;10;3 in your unsorted.csv file. Then I guess you expect a numerically sorted result:

2;1;3
3;1;2
1;2;3
3;2;1
1;3;2
2;3;1
3;10;3

and not an alphabetically sorted one:

2;1;3
3;1;2
3;10;3
1;2;3
3;2;1
1;3;2
2;3;1

To get that, you have to use -n:

sort --field-separator=';' -n -k 2,2 -k 1,1 -k 3,3 unsorted.csv

It is worth mentioning that 2,2 has to be used. If only 2 is used, then sort takes the string from beginning of field 2 to the end. 2,2 makes sure that only field 2 is used.

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    The pointer as to the difference between -k 2, and -k 2,2 is significant! I had overlooked this on my first reading of the man page. Thanks. – usonianhorizon Jul 8 '16 at 18:55

..and if anyone followed the 'sort' solution but now wants to get more than the single unique entry per line (i.e. the top X number of unique entries), once you've sorted the file using 'sort', you can use a little app I created here:

https://github.com/danieliversen/MiscStuff/blob/master/scripts/findTopUniques.java

  • 1
    Good for you! But in your case, you could have just use cat unsorted-file | sort | uniq | head -X - when X is the number of first rows you wish to output. – Slavik Meltser May 31 '16 at 14:58
  • @SlavikMe Thanks a lot for the comment! However, your suggestion gives a different result.. Your suggestion gets the first X lines in the totally sorted file, whereas we wanted to get the first X lines per "key" (i.e. if you have a CSV with names, then if you sort by column 2 "last name" then your commands would perhaps only get 3 lines with "Allen" as the last name whereas ours would get "Allen", "Brittain", "Charles" etc). Thanks though! – Daniel Iversen Jun 2 '16 at 15:27
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    you are wrong. I would've suggest to try out the command I wrote before commenting. Note, that there is a command uniq in pipes order, between the sort and the head, which gives a uniqueness to all sorted rows just before the extraction of top rows. – Slavik Meltser Jun 5 '16 at 4:29

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