301

Is it possible to split a python string every nth character?

For example, suppose I have a string containing the following:

'1234567890'

How can I get it to look like this:

['12','34','56','78','90']

21 Answers 21

447
>>> line = '1234567890'
>>> n = 2
>>> [line[i:i+n] for i in range(0, len(line), n)]
['12', '34', '56', '78', '90']
  • 25
    I think this one is more pythonic. – PJ.Hades Feb 28 '12 at 2:06
  • 22
    This is a really great answer because its not convoluted in any way and that fact allows you to remember the method easily due to its simplicity – Trevor Rudolph Feb 26 '14 at 0:22
  • 15
    Woah, you broke my sarcasm detector, Trevor – George Griffin Aug 19 '14 at 22:07
  • 4
    Ironically, trying to use words in a way that will not have hidden meaning, will often result in convoluted sentences. – deed02392 Nov 3 '15 at 17:32
  • 2
    @MikeIssa [string[sum(n_list[:i]):sum(n_list[:i+1])] for i in range(len(n_list))] or calculate cumsum of n_list for indeces beforehand... Or, ask a new question! – satomacoto Feb 4 '16 at 7:26
173

Just to be complete, you can do this with a regex:

>>> import re
>>> re.findall('..','1234567890')
['12', '34', '56', '78', '90']

As pointed out in the comment, you can do this:

>>> import re
>>> re.findall('..?', '123456789')
['12', '34', '56', '78', '9']

You can also do the following, to simplify the regex for longer chunks:

>>> import re
>>> re.findall('.{1,2}', '123456789')
['12', '34', '56', '78', '9']

And you can use re.finditer if the string is long to generate chunk by chunk.

  • 19
    >>> re.findall('..?','123456789') for odd number of chars support. – Tuttle Feb 7 '13 at 19:09
  • I for one consider this answer to be most "pythonic". Given that re.findall is clearly documented as "return a list of all non-overlapping matches in the string", this code is least cryptic and leaves practically no ambiguity. – Red Jun 7 '18 at 6:21
  • 1
    This is by far the best answer here and deserves to be on top. One could even write '.'*n to make it more clear. No joining, no zipping, no loops, no list comprehension; just find the next two characters next to each other, which is exactly how a human brain thinks about it. If Monty Python were still alive, he'd love this method! – jdk1.0 Dec 12 '18 at 1:27
73

Another common way of grouping elements into n-length groups:

>>> s = '1234567890'
>>> map(''.join, zip(*[iter(s)]*2))
['12', '34', '56', '78', '90']

This method comes straight from the docs for zip().

  • 4
    +1 yup, very pythonic – the wolf Feb 28 '12 at 6:32
  • 2
    In [19]: a = "hello world"; list( map( "".join, zip(*[iter(a)]*4) ) ) get the result ['hell', 'o wo']. – truease.com Apr 18 '13 at 15:54
  • 12
    If someone finds zip(*[iter(s)]*2) tricky to understand, read How does zip(*[iter(s)]*n) work in Python?. – Grijesh Chauhan Jan 11 '14 at 14:49
  • 12
    This does not account for an odd number of chars, it'll simply drop those chars: >>> map(''.join, zip(*[iter('01234567')]*5)) -> ['01234'] – Bjorn Sep 15 '14 at 19:39
  • 3
    To also handle odd number of chars just replace zip() with itertools.zip_longest(): map(''.join, zip_longest(*[iter(s)]*2, fillvalue='')) – Paulo Freitas Jun 8 '17 at 7:44
54

There is already an inbuilt function in python for this.

>>> from textwrap import wrap
>>> s = '1234567890'
>>> wrap(s, 2)
['12', '34', '56', '78', '90']

This is what the docstring for wrap says:

>>> help(wrap)
'''
Help on function wrap in module textwrap:

wrap(text, width=70, **kwargs)
    Wrap a single paragraph of text, returning a list of wrapped lines.

    Reformat the single paragraph in 'text' so it fits in lines of no
    more than 'width' columns, and return a list of wrapped lines.  By
    default, tabs in 'text' are expanded with string.expandtabs(), and
    all other whitespace characters (including newline) are converted to
    space.  See TextWrapper class for available keyword args to customize
    wrapping behaviour.
'''
  • 7
    Thanks @Diptangsu Goswami ! This is a built-in, and easy to use solution. – Mr.Zeus May 9 '18 at 17:55
  • 5
    I think this is the most Pythonic answer. It's in the stdlib and it's extremely readable compared to all other custom solutions provided here. – Sven R. Kunze Sep 6 '18 at 16:27
50

I think this is shorter and more readable than the itertools version:

def split_by_n(seq, n):
    '''A generator to divide a sequence into chunks of n units.'''
    while seq:
        yield seq[:n]
        seq = seq[n:]

print(list(split_by_n('1234567890', 2)))
  • 3
    but not really efficient: when applied to strings: too many copies – Eric Aug 27 '15 at 21:17
  • 1
    It also doesn't work if seq is a generator, which is what the itertools version is for. Not that OP asked for that, but it's not fair to criticize itertool's version not being as simple. – CryingCyclops Jun 28 '17 at 20:47
  • The return or function? – e-info128 Sep 10 '17 at 1:58
19

I like this solution:

s = '1234567890'
o = []
while s:
    o.append(s[:2])
    s = s[2:]
  • Hi @vlk, can you explain a bit more please? It seems that you don't need a counter... How come? Thanks – Andy K Apr 15 '16 at 14:21
  • @Andy In cycle it is until is something in s, just add into cycle print(s) – vlk Apr 16 '16 at 18:19
  • In cycle it is until is something in s = until the end of anything inside of s? – Andy K Apr 16 '16 at 18:22
  • I did the following. It gave me a better understanding names = ['John', 'Jerome', 'Paul', 'George', 'Andy', 'Michael'] while names: print(names) del names[-1] – Andy K Apr 19 '16 at 9:32
18

Using more-itertools from PyPI:

>>> from more_itertools import sliced
>>> list(sliced('1234567890', 2))
['12', '34', '56', '78', '90']
12

You could use the grouper() recipe from itertools:

Python 2.x:

from itertools import izip_longest    

def grouper(iterable, n, fillvalue=None):
    "Collect data into fixed-length chunks or blocks"
    # grouper('ABCDEFG', 3, 'x') --> ABC DEF Gxx
    args = [iter(iterable)] * n
    return izip_longest(fillvalue=fillvalue, *args)

Python 3.x:

from itertools import zip_longest

def grouper(iterable, n, fillvalue=None):
    "Collect data into fixed-length chunks or blocks"
    # grouper('ABCDEFG', 3, 'x') --> ABC DEF Gxx"
    args = [iter(iterable)] * n
    return zip_longest(*args, fillvalue=fillvalue)

These functions are memory-efficient and work with any iterables.

7

Try this:

s='1234567890'
print([s[idx:idx+2] for idx,val in enumerate(s) if idx%2 == 0])

Output:

['12', '34', '56', '78', '90']
  • 1
    Pretty nice one-liner! – Dakkaron Oct 31 '18 at 13:56
  • @Dakkaron Yeah!!!, thank you, happy it's good :-), 😄😄😄 – U9-Forward Nov 1 '18 at 8:10
5

Try the following code:

from itertools import islice

def split_every(n, iterable):
    i = iter(iterable)
    piece = list(islice(i, n))
    while piece:
        yield piece
        piece = list(islice(i, n))

s = '1234567890'
print list(split_every(2, list(s)))
  • Your answer doesn't meet OP's requirement, you have to use yield ''.join(piece) to make it work as expected: eval.in/813878 – Paulo Freitas Jun 8 '17 at 8:15
5
>>> from functools import reduce
>>> from operator import add
>>> from itertools import izip
>>> x = iter('1234567890')
>>> [reduce(add, tup) for tup in izip(x, x)]
['12', '34', '56', '78', '90']
>>> x = iter('1234567890')
>>> [reduce(add, tup) for tup in izip(x, x, x)]
['123', '456', '789']
  • GatorAlli's code is actually better, but I think this is neat, at least. – ben w Feb 28 '12 at 1:57
4

As always, for those who love one liners

n = 2  
line = "this is a line split into n characters"  
line = [line[i * n:i * n+n] for i,blah in enumerate(line[::n])]
  • When I run this in Python Fiddle with a print(line) I get this is a line split into n characters as the output. Might you be better putting: line = [line[i * n:i * n+n] for i,blah in enumerate(line[::n])]? Fix this and it's a good answer :). – Peter David Carter May 20 '16 at 20:24
  • Can you explain the ,blah and why it's necessary? I notice I can replace blah with any alpha character/s, but not numbers, and can't remove the blah or/and the comma. My editor suggests adding whitespace after , :s – toonarmycaptain Jul 17 '17 at 20:11
  • enumerate returns two iterables, so you need two places to put them. But you don't actually need the second iterable for anything in this case. – Daniel F Jul 27 '17 at 9:18
  • 1
    Rather than blah I prefer to use an underscore or double underscore, see: stackoverflow.com/questions/5893163/… – Andy Royal Aug 15 '17 at 10:39
3

I've got this code that I use whenever I need to do this:

def split_string(n, st):
    lst = [""]
    for i in str(st):
        l = len(lst) - 1
        if len(lst[l]) < n: 
            lst[l] += i
        else:
            lst += [i]
    return lst

print(split_string(3, "test_string."))

Where:

  • n is the length of each list item
  • st is the string to be split up
  • lst is the list version of st
  • i is the current character being used in st
  • l is the length of the last list item
  • 8
    Excellent C code – stark Oct 15 '16 at 13:42
1

Spooky one – tried to invent yet another answer:

def split(s, chunk_size):
    a = zip(*[s[i::chunk_size] for i in range(chunk_size)])
    return [''.join(t) for t in a]

print(split('1234567890', 1))
print(split('1234567890', 2))
print(split('1234567890', 3))

Out

['1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '0']
['12', '34', '56', '78', '90']
['123', '456', '789']
1
def split(s, n):
  """
  Split string every nth character

  Parameters
  ----------
  s: string
  n: value of nth
  """
  new_list = []
  for i in range(0, len(s), n):
    new_list.append(s[i:i+n])
  return new_list

print(split('1234567890', 2))
1

more_itertools.sliced has been mentioned before. Here are four more options from the more_itertools library:

s = "1234567890"

["".join(c) for c in mit.grouper(2, s)]

["".join(c) for c in mit.chunked(s, 2)]

["".join(c) for c in mit.windowed(s, 2, step=2)]

["".join(c) for c in  mit.split_after(s, lambda x: int(x) % 2 == 0)]

Each of the latter options produce the following output:

['12', '34', '56', '78', '90']

Documentation for discussed options: grouper, chunked, windowed, split_after

  • Downvoter, please offer your opinion. – pylang Feb 13 at 16:31
1

I know this question is old, but this is the shortest way to do it I'm aware of:

def split_every_n(S, n):
  return [S[i*n:(i+1)*n] for i in range(len(S) / n)]

This, however, assumes that the length of your string is a multiple of n. Otherwise, you'd have to pad it.

1

A simple recursive solution for short string:

def split(s, n):
    if len(s) < n:
        return []
    else:
        return [s[:n]] + split(s[n:], n)

print(split('1234567890', 2))

Or in such a form:

def split(s, n):
    if len(s) < n:
        return []
    elif len(s) == n:
        return [s]
    else:
        return split(s[:n], n) + split(s[n:], n)

, which illustrates the typical divide and conquer pattern in recursive approach more explicitly (though practically it is not necessary to do it this way)

0

Here is another solution for a more general case where the chunks are not of equal length. If the length is 0, all the remaining part is returned.

data is the sequence to be split; fieldsize is a tuple with the list of the field length.

def fieldsplit(data=None, fieldsize=()):
    tmpl=[];
    for pp in fieldsize:
        if(pp>0):
            tmpl.append(line[:pp]);
            line=line[pp:];
        else:
            tmpl.append(line);
            break;
    return tuple(tmpl);
0

One possibility is to use regular expressions:

import re
re.findall("\w{3}", your_string)
-1

I am using this:

list(''.join(s) for s in zip(my_str[::2], my_str[1::2]))

or you can use any other n number instead of 2.

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